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Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

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Frequently Asked Questions

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  1. Can a UCED be the lead applicant if we apply as a consortium of IHEs?
  2. Are proprietary schools (IHEs) eligible to participate in the TPSID program?
  3. How many grants will be awarded to create a program vs. how many to enhance a program?
  4. Can the first year be used as a planning year?
  5. How many letters of support should one include in a TPSID application?
  6. Are there expectations on how different dollars (IDEA vs. grant vs. IHE) are spent?
  7. Does the definition of intellectual disability (ID) include individuals with autism spectrum disorder?
  8. Is there any additional guidance regarding the definition of "meaningful credential"?
  9. Can students who have been home schooled and/or who have gone to private school participate in the TPSID program?
  10. May non-traditional/older students with ID participate in the TPSID program?
  11. The ''program'' and its length will be different for each person. It may be challenging to determine how to award a certificate since each person may require certain things to feel completed. Can you clarify this situation?
  12. What type of commitment should applicants receive from vocational rehabilitation? Is a commitment letter or a letter of support needed?
  13. What can be used to meet the TPSID matching requirement?
  14. How can it be determined that a student has an intellectual disability if the student is not identified with ID in their educational records?
  15. Is there an age limit for students enrolled in TPSID projects? Must the students currently be eligible for a free appropriate education under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) in order to meet the definition of ID in the law?
  16. Are there specific requirements for students to be included in classes or work settings with individuals without disabilities?
  17. What Could A Potential TPSID Program LEA Partnership Be Comprised Of?
  18. Does the TPSID program legislation include providing supports and services to dually enroll students?
  19. Are TPSIDs required to address independent living?
  20. What Could TPSID Program Project Admission Requirements Be Comprised Of?
  21. What are allowable uses of TPSID Program funds?
  22. Is there additional information available regarding the TPSID Program?

1. Can a UCED be the lead applicant if we apply as a consortium of IHEs?

The program legislation does not prohibit an institution of higher education (IHE) that will not have the program at their IHE from serving as the lead applicant.

Experienced and inexperienced applicants must independently decide the role they would like their UCED (University Center for Excellence in Disability) to play with regards to their comprehensive transition programs. All eligible applicants will want to consider a role that is in the overall best interest of their program/project. Applicants that decide to allow an IHE other than the one who will have the comprehensive transition and postsecondary program at their IHE serve as the lead applicant may want to consider how the grant would benefit by having the IHE, who is not going to have the comprehensive transition program at their school, serve as the lead applicant.

Additionally, if you decide to make the UCED the lead entity (although it would not be the entity with the comprehensive transition program at your IHE), please be sure to consider whether or not this may (or may not) affect the evaluation of the comprehensive transition program (because all applicants who receive grants under this program will have specific reporting requirements they must meet as a result of accepting a grant under the TPSID program) and/or may (or may not) effect you as the lead entity's ability to ensure that the goals of the program are met.

Also please note that, for the duration of the project, the IHE to whom TPSID funds are obligated will remain the fiscal agent for the project.

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2. Are proprietary schools (IHEs) eligible to participate in the TPSID program?

No.

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3. How many grants will be awarded to create a program vs. how many to enhance a program?

The Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) will not consider the percentage of projects that will be funded based on where the project is in the development phase. It is expected that there will be a range of approved applications funded, representing the continuum of development. The learning that emanates from these models and the coordinating center will be important in future years to reach out to new programs and encourage their participation in the TPSID program.

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4. Can the first year be used as a planning year?

Effective October 1, 2010, those selected to receive awards under the TPSID program will have access to their grant awards. Additionally, each grantee has reporting requirements that must be met on an annual basis. The reporting period began October 1, 2010.

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5. How many letters of support should one include in a TPSID application?

There is no limitation on the number of letters of support one may submit with their TPSID application, but applicants are asked to be reasonable when making that determination.

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6. Are there expectations on how different dollars (IDEA vs. grant vs. IHE) are spent?

Individuals with Disablities Education Act (IDEA) dollars are guided by the needs of the students as determined in the students IEP (individualized education plan) as appropriate. The use of IDEA dollars must be according to the cost rules of IDEA funding, and always aligned with the needs of students based on the student's individualized education program. There is a 25 percent matching requirement in the TPSID program. This contribution can be in fiscal contributions, or other in-kind contributions that an institution can offer. The entire TPSID budget is not intended to supplant existing program resources that are being used if the institution already has a comprehensive transition and postsecondary program in place. Rather, the TPSID grant is used to extend the scope, breath, or depth of the existing comprehensive transition and postsecondary program. There is requirement for TPSID grants to build sustainable programs -- this can best be accomplished if institutions contribute and support the program early in its development.

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7. Does the definition of intellectual disability (ID) include individuals with autism spectrum disorder?

The comprehensive transition and postsecondary program is targeted at providing access to postsecondary education to those students with intellectual disabilities who traditionally have been unable to participate in higher education. If a student with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) also has a co-occurring documented intellectual disability (significant cognitive impairment with significant limitation in cognitive functioning, and limitations in adaptive behavior, and who was formerly or currently eligible for IDEA services), that student DOES meet the definition of an eligible student under the TPSID program. 

If a student with ASD does not have a co-occurring documented intellectual disability that does not present any significant intellectual or cognitive functioning or adaptive behavior, that student does NOT meet the definition of an eligible student under the TPSID program. The student may be admitted to the institution, and may be considered a student with a disability, and thus is entitled to disability support services and/or accommodations consistent with other federal policies such as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act or the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

In other words, in order for a student to receive supports and services via the TPSID program, that student must still meet the  TPSID program’s definition of a student with an intellectual disability even if the student has ASD with significant cognitive impairment and significant limitation in cognitive functioning or adaptive behavior.  

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8. Is there any additional guidance regarding the definition of "meaningful credential"?

It is important to note that TPSID program grantees are required to award a meaningful credential to your TPSID program participants who have earned them. Applicants will be required to annually report (via your annual performance report) on the status of awarding meaningful credentials to those TPSID program participants who have earned them.

Here is an example of what a potential meaningful credential could be comprised of:

*A two-year credential in which the ID student will need to earn between 9-18 credits via the IHE’s continuing education department;

*The credential would be based on the ID student’s person-centered planning course of study plan;

*As the ID student works to earn their credential, the TPSID project coordinator/academic advisors would work with the ID student to select courses that are based on each individual ID student’s career goals and interests;

*Peer mentors would provide class support;

*While the ID students are taking courses alongside their non-disabled peers, they will be participating in events and activities that allow them to experience increased social inclusion and build their self-advocacy and independent living skills (like time management, how to handle their personal finances, safety, etc.,).;

*Credit-based, experimental and/or community based integrated work experiences could occur on or off campus by vocational rehabilitation agencies or other TPSID project partners;

*Although the TPSID project does not prohibit this, please note that there is a chance that the IHE in question may not allow non-matriculated ID students to live on campus.

Although this is not a TPSID program requirement, it is important to note that, from the standpoint of the TPSID program student participants who have earned a meaningful credential, if the credential they earn is recognized by the issuing and/or other IHEs (and other pertinent entities), this credential translates into a tool that they can use to assist them in their quest for gainful employment.

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9. Can students who have been home schooled and/or who have gone to private school participate in the TPSID program?

Yes. However, these students must have been (or will in the future) participate in an IDEA eligibility determination process and determined to be eligible for IDEA services, regardless of whether they actually did receive or will receive services under IDEA.

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10. May non-traditional/older students with ID participate in the TPSID program?

The program regulations do not prohibit, non-traditional/older adult ID students from participating in the TPSID program.

Applicants who may be considering targeting adult ID students may also want to consider:

IHEs must have written, verifiable documentation that the adult ID students were deemed eligible for IDEA (the students are currently or were formerly, eligible for a free appropriate public education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1140 Section 760 (2));

TPSID grant funds cannot be used for direct financial aid and can only be used for TPSID program supports and services;

A gentle reminder regarding the definition of a student with an intellectual disability: Student with an intellectual disability means a student with a cognitive impairment, or a cognitive impairment that is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual and cognitive functioning; and adaptive behavior as expressed in conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills; and who is currently, or was formerly, eligible for a free appropriate public education (FAPE) under the IDEA. As a result, only those students with disabilities who meet the statutory definition of a student with an intellectual disability may be TPSID program participants (those who are or were formerly eligible for a Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) under the IDEA—the formal IDEA process and has received an IDEA eligibility determination).

Additionally, the U.S. Department of Education recognizes that other disabilities such as certain forms of autism and traumatic brain injury, may be considered intellectual disabilities Sec. 668.233 (c ), the student with an intellectual disability is eligible to receive Federal Pell, FSEOG, and FWS program assistance under subpart O of part 668 (Financial Assistance for Students with intellectual disabilities).  For TPSID program applicants to whom this situation may apply: The IHE that is offering the eligible CTP program must then obtain a record from an LEA that the student is or was eligible for special education and related services under the IDEA.

PLEASE NOTE: If the student’s record does not specifically identify the student as having an intellectual disability:

*The IHE must review all documentation obtained (such as the individualized psycho-educational evaluation and diagnosis of an intellectual disability by a psychologist or other qualified personnel);

*Other acceptable forms of documentation the IHE may review are: a record of the disability from an LEA, SEA or a government agency, such as the Social Security Administration, or a Vocational Rehabilitation agency that identifies the intellectual disability.

 

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11. The ''program'' and its length will be different for each person. It may be challenging to determine how to award a certificate since each person may require certain things to feel completed. Can you clarify this situation?

Each applicant will need to determine these factors on an individual basis. Applicants seeking more detailed information will likely uncover such information during the literature review process and/or they may want to consider conferring with other IHEs or similar entities that have existing comprehensive transition and postsecondary programs for students with intellectual disabilities.

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12. What type of commitment should applicants receive from vocational rehabilitation? Is a commitment letter or a letter of support needed?

The TPSID program legislation does not specifically address this. It is likely that applicants who are interested in a concrete commitment with those entities they plan to work in partnership with, will have some sort of written agreement outlining the terms of the commitment so that all pertinent parties will be clear about what is expected of each entity for the timeframe specified in the written agreement.

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13. What can be used to meet the TPSID matching requirement?

The TPSID program language that speaks to the TPSID program’s matching requirement is as follows:
“Matching requirement-An institution of higher education (or consortium) that receives a grant under this section shall provide
matching funds toward the cost of the model comprehensive transition and postsecondary program for students with intellectual
disabilities carried out under the grant. Such matching funds may be provided in cash or in-kind, and shall be in an amount of not less
than 25 percent of the amount of such costs.”

If needed, here is clarifying information as it relates to the TPSID program matching requirement: “Such Costs” in the above referenced language that addresses the matching requirement via 20 USC 1140g(e) refers to the total costs of the program – meaning the federal award + the match.” In other words, Each applicant is required to match the Federal funding they are applying to receive under the TPSID program, which means that match has to be calculated on the basis of both the Federal and non-Federal amount, in other words the total project costs.  
With this in mind, it is recommended that applicants carefully consider whether or not they will propose to a matching requirement amount that exceeds the minimum 25% requirement under the TPSID program.

The TPSID Program’s matching requirement may be met via cash, or in-kind contribution (such as space, equipment, personnel). Donated time may be used as cost share because the person(s) working on the TPSID grant are not being paid for the time that they are working. The TPSID Program matching requirement (which is comprised only of total direct funds) can not be met with federal funds. 

Please note that the TPSID program has an 8% indirect cost rate cap. Unrecovered indirect costs (IHEs that have negotiated indirect cost rates well above 8% that may be seeking to utilize the remaining indirect costs they were unable to utilize because of the 8% cap) MAY NOT be used to meet the match under the TPSID program.

SPECIAL NOTE: For TPSID Program applicants who voluntarily include a matching percentage that is above the 25% TPSID program matching requirement (for any/all of the project years within their five-year project period) must meet the matching requirement that they proposed and that was included in their funded TPSID program application).

If your project is funded, your IHE must meet the matching requirement that your project annually proposed and was included in your funded TPSID program application—regardless of any challenges that could affect your TPSID/IHE’s ability to do so.

In other words, while considering any percentage above the minimum 25% matching requirement, please factor in the possibility that regardless of unforeseen situations which could affect your project’s original plan for annually meeting your TPSID program matching requirement, your project will still be held accountable for meeting the annual matching requirement that you proposed in your funded application. Once your project is funded under the TPSID program, you will not be allowed to “default” to meeting the 25% minimum matching requirement.

SPECIAL NOTE AS IT RELATES TO YOUR MATCHING REQUIREMENT AND YOUR PARTNERSHIPS:  If your project is funded, and one of your partners neglects to fully meet their commitments that were outlined in your project’s specific Memo of Understanding (MOU) with them, please note that the lead applicant is responsible for developing/implementing a plan for providing the supports/services that the vacated partner is no longer providing (as outlined in your approved Memo of Understanding (MOU). Additionally, if one of your project partners leaves the partnership, the lead applicant must develop a plan for still meeting that partner’s portion of the matching requirement.

Regular written communication with each of your partners will help to minimize the lead applicant’s potential risk of not being aware of potential situations that are similar to what has been mentioned here. Written documentation of potential issues, which includes your mitigation measures and the outcomes of such measures, will need to be shared with your TPSID program officer in a timely manner, via a separate email (and not embedded in the annual performance report).

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14. How can it be determined that a student has an intellectual disability if the student is not identified with ID in their educational records?

Only those students who meet the statutory definition of a student with an intellectual disability may be TPSID program participants. If a student’s educational record does not identify the student as having an intellectual disability, then the institution must obtain documentation establishing that the student has an ID such as (1) A documented comprehensive and individualized psycho-educational evaluation and diagnosis of an intellectual disability by a psychologist or other qualified professional; or (2) A record of the disability from a local or State educational agency, or government agency, such as the Social Security Administration or a vocational rehabilitation agency, that identifies the intellectual disability.

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15. Is there an age limit for students enrolled in TPSID projects? Must the students currently be eligible for a free appropriate education under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) in order to meet the definition of ID in the law?

The TPSID program does not stipulate that TPSID projects are limited to only serving ID students ages 18-26. TPSID projects may propose to serve older adults with intellectual disabilities (who are still eligible for special education and related services under IDEA) who are currently, or were formerly, eligible for free and appropriate public education-Section 760-20 U.S.C. 1140, Section 760 (2). In order to meet the requirement in the definition of a “student with intellectual disability” regarding FAPE, a student does not need to currently be eligible for FAPE, but the student must have been found eligible at some point. The institution must obtain a record from a local educational agency that the student is or was eligible for special education and related services under the IDEA.

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16. Are there specific requirements for students to be included in classes or work settings with individuals without disabilities?

The TPSID program “requires students with intellectual disabilities to be socially and academically integrated with their non-disabled students to the maximum extent possible” (Section 760-20 U.S.C. 1140).

Additionally, please note that the definition of a student with an intellectual disability specifically requires students with intellectual disabilities to participate on not less than a half-time basis, as determined by the IHE. TPSID projects must determine that the clock hours included in their CTP program’s course of study equal full-time status for ID students attending the program. For college programs that do not lead to a degree, there is a required clock hour to credit hour conversion. The financial aid administrator at your IHE will know how to do that conversion for your respective TPSID project.

A clock hour is a time period consisting of one or more of the following:

(1) 50-60 minutes of class, lecture, or recitation in a 60-minute
period;
(2) 50-60 minutes of faculty-supervised laboratory, shop training,
or internship in a 60-minute period;
(3) 60 minutes of preparation in a correspondence course
(also referred to as a contact hour);

With that said, this inclusiveness requirement must be met via the following activity types, as ID students learn alongside their non-disabled peers:

*Regular enrollment in credit bearing, non-credit bearing and/or non-degree courses;

*Internships or work-based training in settings;

*Auditing or participating in courses.

As TPSID project applicants determine what this looks like for each of your respective projects, this inclusiveness requirement should be aligned with your TPSID project participants’ course study plans and post school goals. Please note that on-going assessments, and the incorporation of evidenced based best practices, coupled with experiential learning opportunities, should better assist TPSID project participants as they apply the skills they have acquired, prior to the completion of their  meaningful credential.

Recipients of a TPSID program grant award should note that the U.S. Department of Education (The Department) understands that the current circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic have led to changes in instruction and academic participation for schools across the nation, such as a shift to distance education. The Department believes that students with intellectual disabilities may still be able to participate in a meaningful manner even in these changed academic circumstances. The Department also believes that TPSID program grantees can still meet these requirements if all learning is moved online and grantees consider how academic and social integration of students with intellectual disabilities can happen “to the maximum extent possible,” which will depend on the individual circumstances of each grantee and the students they serve.   
TPSID program grantees will be required to document their efforts to meet these eligibility requirements and substantiate how students with intellectual disabilities are participating on not less than a half time basis, and how they are being socially and academically integrated with non-disabled students.

It is important to note that current TPSID program grantees continue to adhere to this TPSID program requirement and do so with technical assistance information and resources that are being shared with them, as they each implement their funded TPSID grant.

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17. What Could A Potential TPSID Program LEA Partnership Be Comprised Of?

The following is an example of what a potential TPSID Program LEA partnership could be comprised of:

  • A clearly defined TPSID project participant recruitment/referral process between the LEA and the TPSID project in which the TPSID project description and requirements are actively disseminated to the LEAs (special education teachers/administrators, transition coordinators, guidance counselors, etc.

 

  • Interested and eligible ID students and pertinent teams will hold preliminary, and post TPSID person-centered planning participant meetings with ID students and TPSID project personnel over the course of the ID student’s course of study;
  • TPSID project personnel will provide training/professional development for ID students, families, LEAs, and services providers (for the ID student this could be tours of the IHE and informational training re: what skill sets are needed to be a successful college student);

 

  • Mid-point and end of course functional skills assessments of ID students will be completed by their instructors and shared with TPSID projects;
  • On an ongoing basis, TPSID project personnel will evaluate the appropriateness of the supports and services being provided to the project participants to ensure that their needs are being met, and, if needed, make appropriate changes to the student’s person-centered academic/career plan to better meet those needs.

 

If needed, here is some additional LEA related information, as it relates to the TPSID program:

Under Section 612(a)(1) of the IDEA and 34 CFR 300.101, each State and its LEAs must make a Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) available to all children with specified disabilities residing in the State, in mandatory age ranges. Under 34 CFR 300.17(c) of the regulations implementing Part B of the IDEA, FAPE includes an appropriate preschool, elementary school, or secondary school education in the State involved.

Under the IDEA, LEAs are not required to provide FAPE in postsecondary education settings.  In general, Part B, IDEA funds could be used for appropriate education services included in an IEP that are provided outside of a public or private elementary or secondary school though, if, under State law, the education would be considered secondary school education. 

A student with an intellectual disability is eligible to receive Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, and FWS program assistance under Sec.  668.233 if the student satisfies the general student eligibility requirements under Sec.  668.32, except for paragraphs (a), (e), and (f) of that section. Section 668.32(b) states that a student is not eligible to receive Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, or FWS program assistance if he or she is enrolled in elementary or secondary school. In other words, if a student is dually enrolled in a secondary school and an eligible comprehensive transition and postsecondary program, he or she is not eligible for Federal Pell, FSEOG, and FWS program assistance.

Therefore, while an LEA could use Part B, IDEA funds to support a dually enrolled student with a disability's participation in a comprehensive transition and postsecondary program if the services the student received in that program were considered secondary school education under State law and were included in the student's IEP, the student would not be eligible to apply for Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, and FWS program assistance. 

It is optional for TPSID program participants to be dually enrolled, but not a requirement.

IDEA’s Child Find and Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment requirements apply to all individuals who are still at an age at which they could receive special education services in their state.

If a student with an intellectual disability who is dually enrolled in a comprehensive transition and postsecondary program receives services in that program which is considered secondary education in the State and is included in the student's IEP, the SEA or LEA must monitor the student's progress toward annual academic and functional goals, because those entities are responsible, under the IDEA, for ensuring that the services identified in the student's IEP are provided.

Additionally, eligible comprehensive transition and postsecondary programs, which operate through institutions, must meet the program requirements in Sec.  668.232, including establishing a policy for determining whether a student enrolled in the comprehensive transition and postsecondary program is making satisfactory academic progress.

These provisions mean that, if public agencies of a state operate comprehensive transition and postsecondary programs that dually enroll students who are covered by the IDEA to provide services included in the students' IEPs, the state must ensure that interagency agreements or other written mechanisms meeting these requirements are in place. 

TPSID PROGRAM APPLICANTS are advised to please be sure to carefully consider what is being proposed via your comprehensive transition and postsecondary program vs. what IDEA (and other pertinent sources) is/are willing to pay for.

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18. Does the TPSID program legislation include providing supports and services to dually enroll students?

Although the TPSID program legislation does not specifically state that TPSID projects must serve dually enrolled students and it is optional to do so, the TPSID program legislation does apply to all students who are receiving supports and services via the TPSID program, including dually enrolled students as they receive special education transition services from public school systems while participating in TPSID program projects.

Additionally, please note that the TPSID program’s definition of a student with an intellectual disability specifically requires students with intellectual disabilities to participate on not less than a half-time basis, as determined by the IHE. It also “requires students with intellectual disabilities to be socially and academically integrated with their non-disabled students to the maximum extent possible” (Section 760-20 U.S.C. 1140).

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19. Are TPSIDs required to address independent living?

Yes. Supporting students in gaining independent living skills and abilities is specifically included in the TPSID program’s definition of a Comprehensive Transition Program. Institutions must include independent living instruction as part of the TPSID program. Please note that the TPSID program does not require applicants to be fully independent prior to enrollment.

Please note that component “B” of the TPSID Program’s definition of a comprehensive transition program addresses this question:

Comprehensive transition and postsecondary program for students with intellectual disabilities (section 760(1) of the HEA). The term “comprehensive transition and postsecondary program for students with intellectual disabilities” means a degree, certificate, or nondegree program that meets each of the following:

(A) Is offered by an institution of higher education.

(B) Is designed to support students with intellectual disabilities who are seeking to continue academic, career and technical, and independent living instruction at an institution of higher education in order to prepare for gainful employment.

(C) Includes an advising and curriculum structure.

(D) Requires students with intellectual disabilities to participate on not less than a half-time basis as determined by the institution, with such participation focusing on academic components, and occurring through one or more of the following activities:

  • Regular enrollment in credit-bearing courses with nondisabled students offered by the institution.
  • Auditing or participating in courses with nondisabled students offered by the institution for which the student does not receive regular academic credit.
  • Enrollment in non-credit-bearing, nondegree courses with nondisabled students.
  • Participation in internships or work-based training in settings with nondisabled individuals.

(E)       Requires students with intellectual disabilities to be socially and academically integrated with non-disabled students to the maximum extent possible.

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20. What Could TPSID Program Project Admission Requirements Be Comprised Of?

TPSID project admission requirements for TPSID project participants may potentially be comprised of the following:

*Ages 18-26;
*Required documentation of ID as outlined by the TPSID program;
*ID students must demonstrate that they can function independently, and have basic literacy and math skills;
*Demonstrate a moderate level of independence, motivation and express a desire to continue their education on a postsecondary level;
*Demonstrate flexibility and ability to manage stress;
*Family/guardian support of student education, development and independence;
*Pay program cost of $9,000 plus the cost of books, materials, transportation, etc.,;

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21. What are allowable uses of TPSID Program funds?

Beginning on 12/26/14, OMB approved the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (or the Uniform Guidance-2 CFR 200). The Uniform Guidance applies to all grant awards (new and continuation) made on or after 12/26/14. Please note that both audit and indirect cost charges also apply.

The Uniform Guidance supercedes and streamlines requirements from OMB Circulars: A-21, A-87, A-110, and A-122 (which have been placed in OMB guidance); Circulars A-89, A-102, and A-133; and the guidance in Circular A-50 on single audit act follow up;  Circulars A-89, A-102, and A-110 are now in Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200) Subparts B,  C, D Circulars A-21, A-87; and A-122 in Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200); Subpart E- Circulars A-133, and A-50 in Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200), Subpart F-EDGAR Parts 74 to 99 are now in EDGAR Parts 75-79 and 81-99 and Parts 74 and 80 have become part of 2 CFR 200.

You may access the Uniform Guidance by way of the follow link: https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/textidx?SID=6214841a79953f26c5c230d72d6b70a1&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title02/2cfr200_main_02.tpl

The allowable use of TPSID program funds includes providing supports and services for students with intellectual disabilities (such as access to academic info., career development services, personal development services, and technology exploration. TPSID project staff may also provide universal design teaching techniques to faculty);

TPSID program funds MAY NOT be used for:
(1) Direct financial aid;
(2) ID student tuition;
(3) Room and board;
(4) Stipends of any kind via TPSID program funds;
(5) Scholarships of any kind--to grad students, TPSID program participants, no one via TPSID program funds;
(5) Subawards/mini grants of any kind via TPSID program funds.

A  SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING SUBAWARDS-The TPSID program legislation does not explicitly allow subawards. As a result, subawards are not an allowable means of providing supports and services to TPSID project participants. In other words, subawards/mini-grants are not allowed under the TPSID program. This means that lead applicants, nor their partnering IHEs are allowed to make subawards/mini grants. Sub recipients are also not allowed.

If needed, the following are the definitions of a subaward and of a subrecipient:

DEFINITION OF A SUBAWARD 200.92

Subaward. Subaward means an award provided by a pass-through entity to a subrecipient for the subrecipient to carry out part of a Federal award received by the pass-through entity. It does not include payments to a contractor or payments to an individual that is a beneficiary of a Federal program. A subaward may be provided through any form of legal agreement, including an agreement that the pass-through entity considers a contract.

DEFINITION OF A SUBRECIPIENT 200.93

Subrecipient. A subrecipient means a non-Federal entity that receives a subaward from a pass-through entity to carry out part of a Federal program; but does not include an individual that is a beneficiary of such program. A subrecipient may also be a recipient of other Federal awards directly from a Federal awarding agency.

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22. Is there additional information available regarding the TPSID Program?

Additional questions and answers and information from the last technical assistance workshop are available:

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Last Modified: 04/29/2021