Fulbright-Hays--Group Projects Abroad Program

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Frequently Asked Questions

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  1. What is the purpose of the Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad (GPA) program?
  2. Who is eligible to apply?
  3. What kinds of projects can be funded under the GPA program?
  4. Who is eligible to participate in the project?
  5. Are there restrictions on participation for individuals who have received previous Fulbright awards?
  6. Are there other restrictions on who can join a GPA project group?
  7. What is the average length of an award?
  8. What date should an applicant list as the proposed start date for the project?
  9. Does the GPA program have priorities?
  10. What kinds of expenses can be charged to a GPA grant?
  11. Is there a matching requirement?
  12. Are indirect costs allowed to be charged to a GPA grant?
  13. Do the provisions of the "Fly America Act" apply to this program?
  14. Is there a page limitation on the application?
  15. Are appendices allowed?
  16. What techniques are helpful in preparing an application narrative and other important information for the program?
  17. Am I required to submit my application electronically?
  18. If an applicant experiences technical difficulties or has questions regarding the Grants.gov system, whom does he/she contact for assistance?
  19. If an applicant has programmatic questions, whom should he/she contact?
  20. How will applicants be selected to receive grants?
  21. When will applicants be notified of their status?
  22. What is an average size award?
  23. How many grant awards are provided each year?
  24. Are host family stays common in the short-term group programs?
  25. For GPA short-term projects, can the position of Project Director be shared by two-three eligible participants? Does this person have to be PhD?
  26. How does the U.S. staff support themselves abroad? How can the grant pay for key personnel if no U.S.-based salaries/fringe can be paid for with GPA funds?
  27. What level of language proficiency is required by the project participants?
  28. Can we view samples of previously funded successful projects?
  29. Is it possible to visit more than one country?
  30. Can some participants go for four weeks and others for six to eight?
  31. For GPA advanced overseas intensive language training projects, what are the guidelines for determining whether a language program is intensive?
  32. What is the grant cycle for the GPA program?
  33. What if our project prefers to focus on methods and pedagogy of language instruction rather than increasing language proficiency of applicants?
  34. Do the project goals and objectives in the narrative need to map to the PMF forms, or do we select only one or two for PMFs? Are those goal/objectives the same as the ones in narrative or broader?
  35. Should we address the GPRA measure in the application, after receiving the grant award, or both?
  36. What goes under “Other” in the budget line item?
  37. Can undergraduate or graduate students complete the GPA program as part of a credit-bearing course at the college/university?
  38. Is it possible for a GPA to study more than one language in a six-week program, but in the same country? Would both languages need to be among the less commonly taught languages (LTCLs)? Or must only one language be studied in the six-week period abroad?
  39. Can staff at the overseas partner agency/institution be compensated for all their work in planning and managing for the month the teachers are in the country?
  40. Can we recruit participants from K-12 school districts and community colleges, or should it be one of the two? Is it also applicable to staff (project director and co- or sub-director)?
  41. Could you clarify the answer related to 'funding' a GPA project director? Does this mean that some funding is allotted to the responsibilities of the GPA Project Director?
  42. Is it acceptable to apply for a short-term seminar project to integrate international and area studies into STEM curriculum at secondary and post-secondary educational levels as well as the humanities and social sciences?
  43. Do we have to submit a day by day, lecture by lecture, naming each of the presenters and the reading list in the proposal? Or can it be detailed but not with the complete reading list or names of lectures?
  44. Can GPA projects visit travel-warning countries?
  45. If "unsafe" at the time of the grant operation, then what? Assuming that the organization has extensive in-country safety experience & the educators are all on-board with participating, would they be allowed to go or would they need to postpone?
  46. What kinds of paperwork do we need to submit to the host country?
  47. Can the pre-departure orientation be spaced out over a few months, and can it include distance learning reading assignments and online discussion and forum posting? Or are only three day pre-travel trainings allowed?
  48. For FY 2014, there is a competitive preference priority for incorporation of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs) into the GPA project. What are some parameters for this?
  49. What if the country's language is English but is in Ghana, Africa (or another comparable country)?
  50. Is the funding up front or cost reimbursable, for example to purchase airplane tickets?
  51. Do we need to discuss equal opportunity access in the proposal in any section beyond the project management section?
  52. Do support staff and/or project consultant/committee have to be institution employees?
  53. Our center staff will be 100 percent in country for several of our staff and a percentage throughout the year for planning. Is that a problem?
  54. If a faculty member is bi-lingual and has studied in the country and will be able to serve as translator and guide in the country, can that individual be the second person paid for by the grant?
  55. If we request $100,000 and our budget is cut to $80,000 - what would we do? Can we cut the number of participants?
  56. If costs for pre-departure and post-return activities are shared by organizations other than the applicant, must the proposal include a letter of commitment from these organizations? Since a match is not required, is a formal commitment still required?
  57. What is the "degree" of points assigned for the K-12 educators based on? Are some points awarded if K-12 educators do not meet the 50 percent of participants, or is the point assignment contingent on how well integrated they are in the proposal?
  58. If I want to see the application package for details not provided elsewhere, can my grants office provide it or can I get it some other way?

1. What is the purpose of the Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad (GPA) program?

The GPA program is a discretionary grant program designed to contribute to the development and improvement of the study of modern foreign languages and area studies in the United States by providing training opportunities for faculty, teachers, and upperclassmen and/or graduate students in foreign countries outside of Western Europe and where the United States has diplomatic representation. Awards are made under the program to conduct overseas group projects in research, training, curriculum development, and advanced foreign language study.

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2. Who is eligible to apply?

Institutions of higher education, state departments of education, private nonprofit educational organizations, and consortia of institutions, departments, and organizations are eligible to apply.

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3. What kinds of projects can be funded under the GPA program?

There are four kinds of GPA projects. Three are short-term projects: (1) short-term seminar; (2) curriculum development team; and (3) group research or study. The fourth type, advanced overseas intensive language training project, is a longer-term grant for four years. Please refer to the Project Type Descriptions for details on the features of each project type.

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4. Who is eligible to participate in the project?

An individual is eligible to participate in a GPA project, if she/he is:

  • A citizen, national, or permanent resident of the United States; and
  • Currently employed full-time in a United States school system, institution of higher education, local education agency or state education agency (not applicable to students);

And, at least one of the following:

  • A teacher in an elementary or secondary school (please see note below);
  • A faculty member who teaches modern foreign languages or area studies;
  • An experienced education administrator responsible for planning, conducting, or supervising programs in modern foreign languages or area studies at the elementary, secondary, or postsecondary levels;
  • A graduate student or junior or senior in an institution of higher education, who is a prospective teacher in the areas of social sciences, humanities and foreign languages. The student should meet the provisions set by his or her local and state education agencies; or
  • For the Advanced Overseas Intensive Language Training project, the participating student, other than those planning a teaching career, should be planning to apply his or her language skills and knowledge of countries vital to the United States' national security in fields outside of teaching, including government, the professions, or international development.

(Note: All GPA participants must be educators or students who fulfill the criteria above and the selection criteria set by their respective projects and are currently teaching and/or studying in the fields of humanities, social sciences, foreign languages, and/or area studies. Area studies is defined as a program of comprehensive study of the aspects of a society or societies including the study of their geography, history, culture, economy, politics, international relations, or languages. Project participants may also be working in interdisciplinary areas such as business, health, social work, math, science, counseling, engineering, the environment, and technology. If an educator or student is working in a variety of subject areas, s/he must spend the majority of his/her time working with eligible subjects.)

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5. Are there restrictions on participation for individuals who have received previous Fulbright awards?

Yes. Individuals may be awarded a total of four lifetime short-term Fulbright awards (two months or less). Short-term awards would include Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad, Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad, etc.

Short-term award recipients become eligible every two years. For example, a Seminars Abroad 2006 participant could receive a Group Projects Abroad 2008 award and vice versa. A Seminars Abroad 2004 participant could receive a Seminars Abroad 2006 award, etc.

Individuals who are not currently employed and/or studying full-time are not eligible. In addition, individuals who do not meet the GPA program's eligibility criteria listed above are not eligible, unless they are students.

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6. Are there other restrictions on who can join a GPA project group?

Yes. Spouses, other family members, and friends, who have not been selected to participate in a GPA project according to the selection criteria stated in the approved application, are not permitted to join the group at any point during the program.

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7. What is the average length of an award?

Applicants may apply for a maximum grant performance period up to eighteen months in duration for short-term projects and four years for advanced overseas intensive language training projects.

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8. What date should an applicant list as the proposed start date for the project?

For the Fiscal Year 2014 competition, the program office suggests using September 30, 2014 the fiscal competition year as the proposed start date for the GPA short-term projects.

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9. Does the GPA program have priorities?

Yes. The program has an absolute priority which states that projects must focus on one or more of the following geographic regions of the world: Africa; East Asia; South Asia; Southeast Asia and the Pacific; the Western Hemisphere (Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean); East Central Europe and Eurasia; and the Near East.

The program also periodically has invitational and competitive preference priorities. Please check the current fiscal year's Federal Register notice and application package for details.

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10. What kinds of expenses can be charged to a GPA grant?

The grant does not provide funds for project-related expenses within the United States. Grant funds may be used only for the following: a maintenance stipend based on fifty percent of the amount established by the U.S. Department of State; round-trip international travel; a local travel allowance for necessary project-related travel within the host country; purchase of project-related artifacts, books, and other teaching materials in the country of study; rent for instructional facilities in the country of study; clerical and professional services performed by resident instructional personnel in the country of study; and other expenses in the country of study deemed necessary for the project's success and approved in advance by the U.S. Department of Education.

Please note that the GPA program will not provide funds for:

  • U.S.-based salaries and fringe benefits; and
  • U.S.-based activities such as pre-departure orientations and post-travel follow-up.

The applicant may regard the above and other unallowable costs as part of the applicant matching contribution.

For advanced overseas intensive language training projects, the GPA grant may pay for costs associated with pre- and post-foreign language assessment in the host country.

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11. Is there a matching requirement?

No, there is no formal matching requirement for the GPA program. However, the United States Department of Education encourages cost sharing by the project participants and their affiliated institutions, school districts, or organizations to cover the expenses within the United States, and to make up the difference between the grant and the costs of the activities abroad. Applicants are invited to provide cost share through in-kind or cash contributions.

For the GPA short-term projects, a minimum of 16 hours of pre-departure orientation activities should be included in the project design. However, please note that as a United States-based activity, related costs will not be paid for using GPA grant funds.

Follow up activities in the United States, including outreach, curriculum development, and dissemination activities should also be included in the project design, but will not be paid for with GPA grant funds.

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12. Are indirect costs allowed to be charged to a GPA grant?

No. Indirect costs are not allowed to be charged to a GPA grant.

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13. Do the provisions of the "Fly America Act" apply to this program?

Yes, all travel must comply with the Fly America Act. International travel budget estimates ought to be based on jet economy high season rates on U.S. Flag carriers where available.

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14. Is there a page limitation on the application?

Yes. Applicants are limited to a 40-page narrative. In addition, applicants will be asked to submit a one-page abstract, table of contents, line-item budget, and appendices, but these will not count toward the 40-page limit.

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15. Are appendices allowed?

Yes. However, an applicant must be mindful to submit only what is requested and what would be considered supporting documentation of the narrative. For GPA short-term projects, this may include: (1) a detailed preliminary pre-departure orientation and overseas program itinerary; (2) curriculum vitas of key personnel; (3) letters of support; (4) examples of evaluation materials and Performance Measure Forms (PMFs); and (5) other supporting documents, if necessary. Please consult the current application, under "Instructions for Completing the GPA Application Package" for additional information.

For GPA foreign language projects, this may include: (1) curriculum vitas of key personnel; (2) position descriptions; (3) project timeline chart; (4) letters of support; (5) class schedule with details; (6) pre-departure schedule of activities; (7) follow-up activities; (8) examples of evaluation tools; (9) details concerning pre-and post foreign language assessment; and (10) other supporting documents, if necessary.

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16. What techniques are helpful in preparing an application narrative and other important information for the program?
  • Start early.
  • Contact the GPA program officer.
  • Review GPA legislation, rules and regulations, and policy thoroughly.
  • Review the Federal Register Notice and Application Package thoroughly.
  • Review abstracts and application narratives of funded projects.
  • Contact funded grantees for information and assistance.
  • Review promising practices for GPA projects. Visit the program office to review funded projects or review them on the program website.
  • Form an internal task force and management team with appropriate grant, international, and project-related experience.
  • Identify your institution’s/department’s/program’s need and wants.
  • Provide clear, goals, measures, and activities.
  • Provide a detailed plan of operation and evaluation.
  • Prepare a specific and detailed budget.
  • Request letters of support, both from domestic and overseas partners.
  • Identify your academic host country coordinator and establish strong linkages.
  • Address each part of the selection criteria thoroughly and in the order presented.
  • Present a persuasive description of how the pieces fit together and complement each other.
  • Don’t make readers have to search for information.
  • Write in plain English and use correct grammar.
  • Avoid specific professional jargon/acronyms.
  • Register with Grants.gov early.
  • DO NOT wait until the last minute to submit your electronic application.
  • If your application is not funded, consult the reviewer’s comments and consider reapplying.
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17. Am I required to submit my application electronically?

Yes. You must submit your application through the Grants.gov system. Please note that if you are a first-time user of this system, the registration process may take several days to complete.

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18. If an applicant experiences technical difficulties or has questions regarding the Grants.gov system, whom does he/she contact for assistance?

Contact the Grants.gov Contact Center at 1-800-518-4726 or support@grants.gov. For international callers, dial 606-545-5035. They are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (except for federal holidays). GPA program officers are not able to answer technical questions about the Grants.gov system.

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19. If an applicant has programmatic questions, whom should he/she contact?

An applicant should contact a GPA program officer:

For questions regarding the GPA Advanced Overseas Intensive Language Training Projects: Tanyelle Richardson at tanyelle.richardson@ed.gov.

For questions regarding the GPA Short-Term Projects: Carly Borgmeier at carly.borgmeier@ed.gov.

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20. How will applicants be selected to receive grants?

Grantees will be selected through a rigorous peer review process. A three- to five-member panel of non-federal evaluators reviews each application. Each reviewer will prepare a written evaluation of the application and assign points for each selection criterion published in the Federal Register.

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21. When will applicants be notified of their status?

Notifications vary greatly each year. For Fiscal Year 2014, GPA short-term project applicants will be notified no later than September 30, 2014 via e-mail and postal mail. All applicants (successful and unsuccessful) will receive copies of evaluators' scores and comments for reference purposes.

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22. What is an average size award?

The average new award is $80,831 for short-term projects (competed annually) and $172,727 for advanced overseas intensive language training projects (competed every four years). However, the maximum award can be up to $125,000 annually for short-term project awards and $375,000 for advanced overseas intensive language training projects annually.

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23. How many grant awards are provided each year?

The program is estimated to award 17 short-term projects for FY 2014.

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24. Are host family stays common in the short-term group programs?

It is not uncommon for GPA projects to propose host family visits and/or stays. The program encourages this both as an experiential learning experience as well as for potential cost saving measures, where appropriate.

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25. For GPA short-term projects, can the position of Project Director be shared by two-three eligible participants? Does this person have to be PhD?

GPA funds will provide for travel costs for one Project Director from the United States. A second individual (bilingual scholar, curriculum specialist, project director, or other appropriate key personnel) may be allowed, but you must be able to strongly justify why this second person is needed. A second person would be allowed if this person is fully supported with institution funds. Those leading the groups should have academic training, field experience in the host country, administrative experience, language experience, and curriculum experience. These characteristics may be in one person or spread out over multiple individuals including those in the host country. Although it is preferred, this person does not have to have a PhD as long as s/he has the appropriate experience and expertise.

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26. How does the U.S. staff support themselves abroad? How can the grant pay for key personnel if no U.S.-based salaries/fringe can be paid for with GPA funds?

The GPA grant is meant to pay for many, but not all of the project expenses, including those considered to be U.S.-based such as salary and fringe, stipends and honoraria for U.S. key personnel.

These costs should be covered through other sources such as in kind contributions or costshare from the applicant and/or partner institutions.

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27. What level of language proficiency is required by the project participants?

There is no language proficiency requirement for GPA short-term project participants. However, if it is a foreign language training project or language training is an important component of the project, these considerations should be addressed in the GPA application narrative as appropriate.

For GPA advanced overseas intensive language training project participants, they must have the equivalent of two years of training in the language to be studied in order to be eligible for the program.

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28. Can we view samples of previously funded successful projects?

Yes, on the GPA Program Web site, under Resources, there is a link titled Successful Grant Application Narratives. There are also multiple other resources available there including sample pre-departure orientation agendas and host country itineraries (for GPA short-term projects) as well as application workshop materials (for GPA foreign language projects).

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29. Is it possible to visit more than one country?

For GPA short-term projects, yes, it is possible for projects to visit more than one country if it is applicable to the scope of the project. Applicants should thoroughly justify in the application narrative why it is necessary and appropriate for the project to visit more than one country and address issues concerning potential higher travel costs.

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30. Can some participants go for four weeks and others for six to eight?

For GPA sort-term projects, all project participants should be in the country(ies) of study for a minimum of four weeks. It is possible that justification may be made for some participants to stay for a longer period of time, depending upon project activities and scope. These issues should be thoroughly addressed in the application narrative.

Participants on GPA foreign language training projects should remain in the program for the standard period of training, whether a summer, semester, academic or full year.

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31. For GPA advanced overseas intensive language training projects, what are the guidelines for determining whether a language program is intensive?

Language programs should be a minimum of six weeks study in the host country, but can be for much longer including a semester, trimester, academic year or full year. GPA requires a minimum of 120 contact hours, or in-classroom instruction, at the advanced level. The period of study should be consecutive.

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32. What is the grant cycle for the GPA program?

GPA short term projects compete annually for grants with performance periods of 18 months. GPA advanced foreign language projects compete every four years for grants with four performance periods of 12 months each.

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33. What if our project prefers to focus on methods and pedagogy of language instruction rather than increasing language proficiency of applicants?

This is fine as long as it connects back to curriculum. The main focus should be improvement and/or creation of new curriculum in a U.S. education system.

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34. Do the project goals and objectives in the narrative need to map to the PMF forms, or do we select only one or two for PMFs? Are those goal/objectives the same as the ones in narrative or broader?

The narrative and goals/objectives on the PMF should all connect to each other. As an applicant, you should complete at least two (2) goals with measurements and activities listed for each. If selected as a grantee, you will then be required to provide more information.

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35. Should we address the GPRA measure in the application, after receiving the grant award, or both?

You may discuss how you would respond to the GPRA measure; however, reviewers will be most interested in a detailed reply to the project specific goals and measures. If you are awarded the grant, you would then be required to respond to the GPRA measure (or measures) that are appropriate for your program.

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36. What goes under “Other” in the budget line item?

Anything that isn’t included in one of the “primary” line items – but make sure that it’s spelled out and not all lumped together into one large amount. It should be transparent and easy to see exactly what you’re proposing.

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37. Can undergraduate or graduate students complete the GPA program as part of a credit-bearing course at the college/university?

This is up to each institution, but it is allowable to do so. We would encourage you to think about the overall per-participant cost and try to keep their contribution to a reasonable amount.

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38. Is it possible for a GPA to study more than one language in a six-week program, but in the same country? Would both languages need to be among the less commonly taught languages (LTCLs)? Or must only one language be studied in the six-week period abroad?

Sure, two languages could be allowed, if it is applicable to the scope of the project. However, you would need to determine and then demonstrate that sufficient time is available to study both of those languages as extensively under the requirements of the program. You would need to show that the participants are truly able to learn both of those languages. Also, think about whether or not this the best use of project funds.

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39. Can staff at the overseas partner agency/institution be compensated for all their work in planning and managing for the month the teachers are in the country?

Yes, staff can be compensated, but it should be kept reasonable. Think about the overall allowable costs of the project. If the compensation for staff seems high, then the reviewers may also think that as well. Also, the grant funds from this program should not pay for full salaries for any position.

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40. Can we recruit participants from K-12 school districts and community colleges, or should it be one of the two? Is it also applicable to staff (project director and co- or sub-director)?

Eligible participants are K-12 educators/administrators, postsecondary faculty and pre-service teachers (eligibility requirements are also posted on the GPA program website). A participant group can include any combination of K-12 teachers and/or postsecondary educators and administrators. The project director is typically someone who employed at the institution (2- or 4-year) from which they are applying.

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41. Could you clarify the answer related to 'funding' a GPA project director? Does this mean that some funding is allotted to the responsibilities of the GPA Project Director?

GPA program does not allow domestic expenditures, including salaries or partial salaries for the Project Director. Funds can only be used internationally. Travel and expenses overseas are allowed. For salaries, fringe benefits, etc. of a Project Director, these should be listed in a separate column on the budget, such as in kind contributions or cost-share from the applicant and/or partner institutions.

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42. Is it acceptable to apply for a short-term seminar project to integrate international and area studies into STEM curriculum at secondary and post-secondary educational levels as well as the humanities and social sciences?

Participants may be working in interdisciplinary areas IF the participant spends the majority of his/her time with the eligible subjects.

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43. Do we have to submit a day by day, lecture by lecture, naming each of the presenters and the reading list in the proposal? Or can it be detailed but not with the complete reading list or names of lectures?

Your proposal must be as detailed and specific as possible. Daily schedules should be clearly stated, as well as lecturers.

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44. Can GPA projects visit travel-warning countries?

Travelling in travel warning countries will need to be addressed on a case-by-case basis. It is possible that a country that is "unsafe" to travel to now, may be safe by the time the program takes place (and vice-versa).

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45. If "unsafe" at the time of the grant operation, then what? Assuming that the organization has extensive in-country safety experience & the educators are all on-board with participating, would they be allowed to go or would they need to postpone?

Travel must be approved by the program office. Approval must also be given by the country -- the Embassy or Fulbright Commission. If travel is not approved, then it may be possible to request a "no cost extension." This would be a conversation between the program office and the grantee at the appropriate time.

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46. What kinds of paperwork do we need to submit to the host country?

For all GPA projects, each grantee must contact the Embassy and/or Fulbright Commission to inform them of their upcoming travel. Before grant awards are made, the program staff in IFLE seeks approval from these entities, so they should be aware of your program. You should remind them that it's a Department of Education (ED) program, that ED contacted them already and received their approval; also, send them the list of participants, your in-country itinerary, and your one-page abstract. If they request additional information, within reason, you should send them that information as well.

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47. Can the pre-departure orientation be spaced out over a few months, and can it include distance learning reading assignments and online discussion and forum posting? Or are only three day pre-travel trainings allowed?

It is certainly allowable to do pre-departure orientations and meetings earlier than just immediately before the program (i.e., distance). Many Project Directors do this, especially for nationwide participant groups.

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48. For FY 2014, there is a competitive preference priority for incorporation of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs) into the GPA project. What are some parameters for this?

Examples of a parameter: "substantive training and thematic focus." For example how many hours of in-country language training required? In order to receive additional points for this priority, a very strong application will include 15 or more hours per week in one of the LCTLs listed in the application package.

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49. What if the country's language is English but is in Ghana, Africa (or another comparable country)?

A FY 2013 applicant was awarded funds for a GPA project in Ghana. So, yes, travel to Ghana is allowed and fundable. GPA projects are funded for projects outside of Western Europe, even if English is spoken there. For competitive preference points for the language component, of course, you would not be able to receive additional points, since English is not on the list of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs).

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50. Is the funding up front or cost reimbursable, for example to purchase airplane tickets?

Funding is given to the institution in an account. You "draw down" on those funds as they are needed. Any expenditure made in advance of receiving the award would be at the risk of the applicant. Airplane tickets must be approved by the program office PRIOR to purchase. You can work to have them placed "on hold" but purchases should not be made until approved. Also, all travel must be Fly America Act (FAA) compliant.

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51. Do we need to discuss equal opportunity access in the proposal in any section beyond the project management section?

Yes, equal opportunity access must be discussed. You can include your institution's language on this. There are some sample applications posted online that will give you an idea of where this is typically included in the application.

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52. Do support staff and/or project consultant/committee have to be institution employees?

It is not completely mandatory; however, if the project director or other key personnel are not at the institution, there should be some point of contact there.

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53. Our center staff will be 100 percent in country for several of our staff and a percentage throughout the year for planning. Is that a problem?

For any GPA project, the institution or other agency must have a lead grantee in the United States. As far as staff working in the host-country, this is fine.

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54. If a faculty member is bi-lingual and has studied in the country and will be able to serve as translator and guide in the country, can that individual be the second person paid for by the grant?

As noted previously when discussing staff supported by grant funds, you would have to provide a very strong rationale for the inclusion of a second person.

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55. If we request $100,000 and our budget is cut to $80,000 - what would we do? Can we cut the number of participants?

This will be discussed with each grantee on a case-by-case basis. We work with each grantee to maintain the original proposal as much as we possibly can. It will be a conversation between the program office and the grantee.

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56. If costs for pre-departure and post-return activities are shared by organizations other than the applicant, must the proposal include a letter of commitment from these organizations? Since a match is not required, is a formal commitment still required?

Yes, letters of commitment/support are typically a part of the application (uploaded in the appendices). Restrictions on page length and where to upload these are also on page 59 of the application package. A formal match is not required, but you would still be encouraged to include any funds that are covered by the institution -- these would be considered as "informal" matching or cost-share (things such as your salaries, conference rooms, supplies provided, etc.).

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57. What is the "degree" of points assigned for the K-12 educators based on? Are some points awarded if K-12 educators do not meet the 50 percent of participants, or is the point assignment contingent on how well integrated they are in the proposal?

In order to meet the criteria, 50percent of the group MUST be K-12. Any less than that will not receive additional points. It is also contingent on how well they are integrated into the proposal.

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58. If I want to see the application package for details not provided elsewhere, can my grants office provide it or can I get it some other way?

Most institutions have a grants or sponsored research office. They should be able to assist you with the application process and provide all the materials you need. It's also available online through Grants.gov and the notice that is posted on the Federal Register.

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Last Modified: 06/25/2014