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Promoting Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans Program

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Project Design Questions:Q24-Q36
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Evidence and Evaluation Questions:Q43-Q49


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  1. What are the purposes of the Promoting Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans Program (PPOHA) program?
  2. Who is eligible to apply for the PPOHA program?
  3. When is the next competition for new awards?
  4. Will the PPOHA program provide technical assistance (TA) webinars for applicants?
  5. What types of projects have been funded in previous competitions?
  6. Can an IHE submit more than one application for a PPOHA grant?
  7. What is the application process for the FY 2022 competition?
  8. When is the deadline for submitting an application for the FY 2022 competition?
  9. What is the duration of the grant awards?
  10. How much funding is available for new awards for the FY 2022 competition?
  11. What is the average size of the grant awards?
  12. How many grants will be funded in FY 2022?
  13. What is the Absolute Priority for the FY 2022 competition?
  14. Am I required to respond to the Absolute Priority?
  15. What are the Competitive Preference Priorities (CPPs) for the FY 2022 competition?
  16. What is the Invitational Priority for the FY 2022 competition?
  17. How do I indicate my responses to the priorities in my application?
  18. Whom should I contact if I have additional questions?
  19. How do I document in my application that my IHE is eligible for a PPOHA grant?
  20. Is my IHE eligible to apply for a PPOHA grant if it holds other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSI) grants?
  21. May I apply for a FY 2022 PPOHA grant if my IHE currently holds a PPOHA grant or a DHSI grant?
  22. If our IHE currently has a Title V, part A proposal pending, may we apply for a PPOHA grant?
  23. If our IHE has two proposals pending under Title V (DHSI and PPOHA), and we are offered both grants, would we be able to accept both grants, or must we choose one or the other?
  24. How can my IHE ensure a strong application?
  25. How do you determine "low-income" students for PPOHA grants?
  26. Can PPOHA funds be used to create a new postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential program?
  27. Can PPOHA funds be used to enhance an existing postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential program?
  28. Can PPOHA funds be used at the undergraduate level?
  29. Can PPOHA funds be used for a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program?
  30. Can PPOHA funds be used for a bridge program that prepares undergraduate students to apply for and be successful in graduate school?
  31. Can PPOHA funds be used for outreach to students that have completed their undergraduate degree?
  32. Is there a difference between support to an IHE for developing a curriculum and support for students per se?
  33. Are non-degree or non-credit courses that are needed to help prepare a student for a postsecondary credential allowable under PPOHA?
  34. If an IHE does not offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or program, is it eligible to apply for PPOHA?
  35. May an IHE that does not offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or program partner with an HSI that does offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or program to apply for PPOHA?
  36. Does the PPOHA program allow subgrantees?
  37. What are some of the allowable activities under the PPOHA program?
  38. What is the distinction between operational costs and developmental costs under the PPOHA allowable activities?
  39. How does one determine allowable costs under the PPOHA program?
  40. May PPOHA grants offer direct student financial assistance?
  41. Are indirect costs allowable under the PPOHA program?
  42. Is there a cost matching requirement under the PPOHA program?
  43. Where can I find resources for developing a logic model?
  44. For the promising evidence standard, must I use studies from the Department’s What Works Clearinghouse?
  45. When searching using the term “postbaccalaureate” in the WWC, there are few relevant studies. How can I find relevant studies for my PPOHA project?
  46. Should applicants mark “Demonstrates a Rationale” or “Promising Evidence” when completing the Evidence Form (OMB No. 1894-0001)?
  47. Should applicants complete all 3 columns on the Evidence Form (OMB No. 1894-0001)?
  48. Is the logic model limited to one page?
  49. Is there software available that can help IHEs build a logic model?

1. What are the purposes of the Promoting Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans Program (PPOHA) program?

The purposes of the PPOHA program are to (1) expand postbaccalaureate educational opportunities for, and improve the academic attainment of, Hispanic students; and (2) expand the postbaccalaureate academic offerings and enhance the program quality in the institutions of higher education that are educating the majority of Hispanic college students and helping large numbers of Hispanic and low-income students complete postsecondary degrees.

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2. Who is eligible to apply for the PPOHA program?

Designated Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) that offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or postbaccalaureate program are eligible to apply for the PPOHA program. To be designated as an eligible HSI, an institution must apply for and receive designation through the Department’s yearly application process. To be eligible for HSI designation, an Institution of Higher Education (IHE) must have an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent (FTE) students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic students at the end of the award year immediately preceding the date of application. For additional information on all eligibility requirements, please review the PPOHA program statute on eligibility and the materials at the Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) eligibility designations webpage.

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3. When is the next competition for new awards?

The PPOHA program published a Notice Inviting Applications (NIA) for new awards for Fiscal Year (FY) 2022 in the Federal Register on June 13, 2022. Please review the NIA at the Federal Register and the application materials at Grants.gov under Federal Funding Opportunity Number ED-GRANTS-061322-001.

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4. Will the PPOHA program provide technical assistance (TA) webinars for applicants?

Yes, the PPOHA program has scheduled four (4) TA webinars for applicants on June 20, 2022, at 11:00 AM Eastern Time, June 29, 2022, at 3:00 PM Eastern Time, July 7, 2022, at 1:00 PM Eastern Time, and July 19, 2022, at 11:00 AM Eastern Time. To access the webinar links, please view the Applicant Info webpage.

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5. What types of projects have been funded in previous competitions?

Please review the posted abstracts at the Awards webpage for information on successful grant applications.

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6. Can an IHE submit more than one application for a PPOHA grant?

No. The NIA states that an eligible IHE may submit one Individual Development Grant application under this competition. If an IHE submits more than one application, the Department will only review the last submission received by Grants.gov.

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7. What is the application process for the FY 2022 competition?

All applications must be submitted electronically through Grants.gov. In addition, applicants are required to follow the Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on December 27, 2021 (86 FR 73264), which contain requirements and information on how to submit an application.

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8. When is the deadline for submitting an application for the FY 2022 competition?

The deadline for the FY 2022 competition is Thursday, July 28, 2022, at 11:59:59 PM Eastern Time.

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9. What is the duration of the grant awards?

PPOHA grants are five (5)-year Individual Development Grants.

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10. How much funding is available for new awards for the FY 2022 competition?

The estimated available funds are $5,900,000.

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11. What is the average size of the grant awards?

The estimated range of PPOHA grant awards are $500,000-$600,000 per year for five years, and the average estimated award is $550,000. The maximum award per year is $600,000.

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12. How many grants will be funded in FY 2022?

The Department estimates it will fund between 10-12 grant projects for FY 2022; however, this number may change depending on the quality of the applications received.

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13. What is the Absolute Priority for the FY 2022 competition?

As stated in the NIA, the Absolute Priority for the FY 2022 competition is “Expanding the number of Hispanic and other underrepresented graduate and professional students that can be served by the institution by expanding courses and institutional resources (section 503 (b)(14)).” As noted in the Application Package, applicants should demonstrate how they will expand academic offerings that prepare graduate students for the workforce by developing or enhancing current course offerings in existing postgraduate degree, certificate, or credentialing programs or by establishing new postgraduate degree, certificate, or credentialing programs. Additionally, we encourage applicants to form partnerships with other HSIs and non-HSI IHEs, as well as workforce entities, that may assist the applicant IHE in leveraging resources and opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, workplace learning, or similar experiences for students.

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14. Am I required to respond to the Absolute Priority?

As stated in the NIA, we consider only applications that meet this priority. Applicants that do not respond to this priority (i.e., do not design their projects to address this requirement) will be marked as ineligible and will not be reviewed.

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15. What are the Competitive Preference Priorities (CPPs) for the FY 2022 competition?

As stated in the NIA, there are two optional CPPs for this year’s competition. You may choose to respond to one, both, or none.

CPP 1 is: Meeting Student Social, Emotional, and Academic Needs. Applicants may receive up to 10 additional points, depending on the quality of the response, for responding to this priority. The priority consists of two parts (a and b), and applicants may choose to respond to one or both of the factors in the priority. The language of the priority is:

(a) Creating education or work-based settings that are supportive, positive, identity-safe and inclusive with regard to race, ethnicity, culture, language, and disability status, through supporting students to engage in real-world hands-on learning that is aligned with classroom instruction and takes place in community-based settings, such as apprenticeships, pre-apprenticeships, work-based learning, and service learning, and in civic activities, that allow students to apply their knowledge and skills, strengthen their employability skills, and access career exploration opportunities. (up to 4 points)
(b) Creating a positive, inclusive, and identity-safe climate at institutions of higher education through one or more of the following activities:
(1) Implementing evidence-based practices for advancing student success for underserved students. (up to 3 points)
(2) Providing evidence-based professional development opportunities designed to build asset-based mindsets for faculty and staff on campus and that are inclusive with regards to race, ethnicity, culture, language, and disability status. (up to 3 points)

CPP2 is: Increasing Postsecondary Education Access, Affordability, Completion, and Post-Enrollment Success. Applicants may receive up to 5 additional points for responding to this priority. This priority has only one factor that is worth up to 5 points, depending on the quality of the response. The language of the priority is:

Projects that are designed to increase postsecondary access, affordability, completion, and success for underserved students by supporting the development and implementation of high-quality and accessible learning opportunities, including learning opportunities that are accelerated or hybrid online; credit-bearing; work-based; and flexible for working students.

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16. What is the Invitational Priority for the FY 2022 competition?

As stated in the NIA, the Invitational Priority is optional, and no points are earned for responding to this priority. The Invitational Priority reflects the Secretary’s priority to increase diversity in the educator workforce. Although no points are awarded, increasing diversity in the educator workforce is something the Department encourages and would like to support as it aligns with our mission and program priorities. The language of the Invitational Priority is “Projects that are designed to establish or expand entry points into the educator pipeline in an effort to increase the number of Hispanic educators and/or the number of Hispanic students earning post-graduate degrees in preparation for employment as an educator.” Under this priority, we are particularly interested in projects that are designed to establish, improve, or expand programs that: (a) recruit racially, ethnically, and linguistically diverse educators; (b) retain diverse educators by strengthening support networks and providing professional development; and/or (c) combine traditional academic training with specialized knowledge and skills that will prepare students for entry into the educator profession.

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17. How do I indicate my responses to the priorities in my application?

You should provide separate responses for each priority in your application and label and bold the sections with your responses. For your response to the Absolute Priority, you should also ensure that your entire project is designed around your response to the Absolute Priority.

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18. Whom should I contact if I have additional questions?

For questions related to the PPOHA program or the FY 2022 competition, contact Margarita L. Meléndez at Margarita.Melendez@ed.gov. For questions related to Grants.gov and the application process, contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at 1-800-518-4726 or support@grants.gov.

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19. How do I document in my application that my IHE is eligible for a PPOHA grant?

Applicants are responsible for demonstrating eligibility under this program. An applicant should include the most recent eligibility designation letter issued by the Department. That letter is available on your IHE’s dashboard in the HEPIS system. Instructions for FY 2022 are available at https://hepis.ed.gov/assets/pdf/Eligibility_2022_Application_Booklet.pdf. In addition, the Department will compare the data and documentation the institution relied on in its application with data reported to the Department's Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), the IHE's State-reported enrollment data, and the institutional annual report. If different percentages or data are reported in these various sources, the institution must, as part of the 25 percent assurance verification, explain the reason for the differences. If the IPEDS data show that less than 25 percent of the institution's undergraduate FTE students are Hispanic, the burden is on the institution to show that the IPEDS data is inaccurate. If the IPEDS data indicate that the institution has an enrollment of undergraduate FTE students that is less than 25 percent, and the institution fails to demonstrate that the IPEDS data is inaccurate, the institution will be considered ineligible. For additional information on all eligibility requirements, please review the PPOHA program statute on eligibility and the materials at the Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) eligibility designations webpage.

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20. Is my IHE eligible to apply for a PPOHA grant if it holds other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSI) grants?

If your IHE holds a Title III, parts A or B grant (SIP, ANNH, TCCU, AANAPISI, NASNTI, PBI, HBCU, or HBGI), then it is not eligible to apply for a PPOHA grant. If your IHE holds a Title V, parts A or B grant (DHSI or PPOHA); Title III, part F (HSI STEM & Articulation); Title III, part F (ANNH, NASNTI, AANAPISI); Title III, part E (MSEIP); or Title VII, part A program grant, then it is eligible to apply for a PPOHA grant.

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21. May I apply for a FY 2022 PPOHA grant if my IHE currently holds a PPOHA grant or a DHSI grant?

Yes, you may apply for a FY 2022 PPOHA grant if you currently hold a PPOHA or DHSI grant.

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22. If our IHE currently has a Title V, part A proposal pending, may we apply for a PPOHA grant?

Yes, you may apply for a Title V, part B, PPOHA grant. Please refer to Question 21.

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23. If our IHE has two proposals pending under Title V (DHSI and PPOHA), and we are offered both grants, would we be able to accept both grants, or must we choose one or the other?

You may accept both grants if you choose.

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24. How can my IHE ensure a strong application?

The heart of the PPOHA application is a well-designed Comprehensive Development Plan (CDP). IHEs should consider identifying ways in which expanding graduate opportunities for their Hispanic and low-income students will align with their CDP, which seeks to identify weaknesses of major areas at the IHE (academic programs, institutional management, or fiscal stability). For additional information, please review the Quality of the Comprehensive Development Plan selection criterion in the NIA. In addition, for this year’s competition, under the Absolute Priority, applicants are required to expand the number of Hispanic and other underrepresented graduate and professional students that can be served by the institution by expanding courses and institutional resources. We encourage you to do this by developing or enhancing current course offerings in existing postgraduate degree, certificate, or credentialing programs or by establishing new postgraduate degree, certificate, or credentialing programs and by partnering with IHEs, as well as workforce entities, that may assist you in leveraging resources and opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, workplace learning, or similar experiences for students.

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25. How do you determine "low-income" students for PPOHA grants?

A low-income student is a student whose family’s taxable income does not exceed 150 percent of the amount equal to the poverty level, as established by the U.S. Census Bureau. The definition of ‘‘low-income’’ is found in the Department’s regulations at 34 CFR 606.3(c) and 607.3(c). The 2020 poverty guidelines are available through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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26. Can PPOHA funds be used to create a new postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential program?

Yes, PPOHA funds may be used to create or develop new postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential programs. Under this year’s Absolute Priority, applicants are required to either develop or enhance postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential programs that will prepare graduate students for the workforce.

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27. Can PPOHA funds be used to enhance an existing postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential program?

Yes, PPOHA funds may be used to enhance an existing postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential program. Under this year’s Absolute Priority, applicants are required to either develop or enhance postbaccalaureate degree, certificate, or credential programs that will prepare graduate students for the workforce.

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28. Can PPOHA funds be used at the undergraduate level?

No. PPOHA funds are designed for persons/programs who have completed a baccalaureate degree. The intended use of the funds are for activities and supports at the postbaccalaureate level.

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29. Can PPOHA funds be used for a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program?

PPOHA funds may only be used for the portion of the program that supports students/activities beyond the first bachelor’s degree.

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30. Can PPOHA funds be used for a bridge program that prepares undergraduate students to apply for and be successful in graduate school?

No, PPOHA funds may only be used to support post-baccalaureate students. Per the PPOHA authorized activities, PPOHA funds may be used to support low-income postbaccalaureate students including outreach, academic support services, mentoring, scholarships, fellowships, and other financial assistance to permit the enrollment of such students in postbaccalaureate certificate and postbaccalaureate degree granting programs.

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31. Can PPOHA funds be used for outreach to students that have completed their undergraduate degree?

Yes, funds may be used to support outreach to postbaccalaureate students.

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32. Is there a difference between support to an IHE for developing a curriculum and support for students per se?

Under the Absolute Priority for FY 2022, IHEs must expand courses and institutional resources by developing or enhancing course offerings in an existing graduate degree, certificate, or credentialing program, or establishing new graduate degree, certificate, or credentialing programs. Developing a curriculum would fall under the requirements of the Absolute Priority, and it is also one of the authorized activities under PPOHA. Support for students can include academic supports (such as tutoring, exam preparation, writing and research support) and holistic supports (such as mentoring, financial counseling, and mental health services). Both types of supports are allowed under PPOHA.

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33. Are non-degree or non-credit courses that are needed to help prepare a student for a postsecondary credential allowable under PPOHA?

Support for non-degree or non-credit courses that cannot be applied towards the requirements for a postsecondary degree, diploma, certificate, or other recognized postsecondary credential is not allowable. PPOHA supports courses or programs that can be applied towards the requirements for a postsecondary degree, diploma, certificate, or other recognized postsecondary credential.

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34. If an IHE does not offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or program, is it eligible to apply for PPOHA?

No. Per the PPOHA statute, the IHE must be a designated HSI and offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or program.

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35. May an IHE that does not offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or program partner with an HSI that does offer a postbaccalaureate certificate or program to apply for PPOHA?

Yes, it may, but the IHE that meets the PPOHA eligibility requirements (i.e., is a designated HSI and offers a postbaccalaureate certificate or program) must be the lead applicant/fiscal agent.

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36. Does the PPOHA program allow subgrantees?

Yes. As stated in the NIA, grantees may award subgrants to local educational agencies (LEAs), State educational agencies (SEAs), other IHEs, and nonprofit organizations. The grantee may award subgrants to entities it has identified in an approved application or that it selects through a competition under procedures established by the grantee.

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37. What are some of the allowable activities under the PPOHA program?

The authorized activities for PPOHA are contained in 20 U.S.C. § 1102b and include: (1) Purchase, rental, or lease of scientific or laboratory equipment for educational purposes, including instructional and research purposes; (2) Construction, maintenance, renovation, and improvement of classrooms, libraries, laboratories, and other instructional facilities, including purchase or rental of telecommunications technology equipment or services; (3) Purchase of library books, periodicals, technical and other scientific journals, microfilm, microfiche, and other educational materials, including telecommunications program materials; (4) Support for low-income postbaccalaureate students including outreach, academic support services, mentoring, scholarships, fellowships, and other financial assistance to permit the enrollment of such students in postbaccalaureate certificate and postbaccalaureate degree granting programs; (5) Support of faculty exchanges, faculty development, faculty research, curriculum development, and academic instruction; (6) Creating or improving facilities for Internet or other distance education technologies, including purchase or rental of telecommunications technology equipment or services; (7) Collaboration with other institutions of higher education to expand postbaccalaureate certificate and postbaccalaureate degree offerings; (8) Other activities proposed in the application submitted pursuant to 20 U.S.C. 1102c that—(A)contribute to carrying out the purposes of the PPOHA program; and (B) are approved by the Secretary as part of the review and acceptance of PPOHA applications.

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38. What is the distinction between operational costs and developmental costs under the PPOHA allowable activities?

PPOHA grant funds should be used to benefit your graduate students and not primarily to support general IHE expenses. For example, costs related to maintenance, general administrative tasks, or overall IHE operating costs should not be included in the PPOHA project. Costs related to academic programs (including expanding or enhancing course offerings), direct student services (such as tutoring or counseling), upgrading facilities to enhance student learning, and faculty professional development are all examples of appropriate costs under the PPOHA program.

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39. How does one determine allowable costs under the PPOHA program?

All project costs must align with the PPOHA program statute and with the funded project’s goals and objectives. In addition, project costs must be reasonable, allocable, and allowable, in accordance with the Cost Principles and other requirements in the Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200.404, 200.405, and 200.403, respectively).

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40. May PPOHA grants offer direct student financial assistance?

The PPOHA statute allows scholarships, assistantships, fellowships, and other financial assistance for Hispanic and low-income graduate students. Grantees may use up to 20 percent of their total PPOHA grant for these expenses, to include travel expenses for graduate students at professional conferences and to conduct research.

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41. Are indirect costs allowable under the PPOHA program?

Yes, indirect costs are allowed. The PPOHA program uses a restricted indirect cost rate (ICR). Under a restricted indirect cost rate, IHEs are limited to an 8% Modified Total Direct Cost (MTDC) base. Please see 34 CFR 76.564(c)(2) for more information. In addition, please refer to the paragraph titled Section III: General of your IHE’s ICR agreement, that covers statutory or administrative limitations of a given grant (e.g., restricted programs ). If you are claiming indirect costs in your application, please include a copy of the ICR agreement in your application package. For more information regarding indirect costs, please visit the Department’s Indirect Cost Rate Division webpage or email them at IndirectCostDivision@ed.gov.

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42. Is there a cost matching requirement under the PPOHA program?

If the IHE plans to establish an endowment fund as part of the approved grant activities, a dollar-for-dollar match is required for each Federal dollar used for that purpose. No other cost matching is required.

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43. Where can I find resources for developing a logic model?

There are several resources for developing a logic model posted at Grants.gov under the PPOHA Opportunity Number. These resources are from the Department’s Regional Educational Laboratories (RELs). Also, the Education Logic Model (ELM) application is a downloadable, browser-based application that will help you build a logic model by answering a series of questions.

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44. For the promising evidence standard, must I use studies from the Department’s What Works Clearinghouse?

A study does not need to meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) Standards to meet the definition of Promising Evidence. However, studies that meet the WWC standards and show a statistically significant effect of a project component on a relevant outcome do meet the Promising evidence standard. Therefore, the WWC can be a helpful source for studies and research that you may want to use for your PPOHA project. If you choose to use studies from another source, you should include information in your application regarding the protocols and rigor of the source in its review of studies.

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45. When searching using the term “postbaccalaureate” in the WWC, there are few relevant studies. How can I find relevant studies for my PPOHA project?

Search for terms related to the academic content or pedagogical approach on which you are designing your project, such as “nursing, “computer science,” “mentoring for graduate students,” “academic advising,” or “online modules” (these examples are for illustrative purposes only). Also remember that “postbaccalaureate” may include master’s and doctoral degrees, certificates, and credentials, so you may try searching under those terms as well.

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46. Should applicants mark “Demonstrates a Rationale” or “Promising Evidence” when completing the Evidence Form (OMB No. 1894-0001)?

As defined in the NIA, “demonstrates a rationale” means a key project component included in the project’s logic model is informed by research or evaluation findings that suggest the project component is likely to improve relevant outcomes. “Promising evidence” means that there is evidence of the effectiveness of a key project component in improving a relevant outcome, based on a relevant finding from one of the following: (i) a practice guide prepared by the (WWC); (ii) an intervention report prepared by the WWC; or (iii) a single study assessed by the Department. To receive the maximum points under the Quality of the Project Design criterion, your project must demonstrate a rationale and be supported by promising evidence. You demonstrate your rationale by creating a logic model for your project; the logic model should include a project component that is informed by research. You document your use of promising evidence by citing the studies or reports that show that the project component(s) in your logic model meet the Promising evidence definition. definition. Therefore, on the Evidence Form, you should mark both “Demonstrates a Rationale” and “Promising Evidence.”

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47. Should applicants complete all 3 columns on the Evidence Form (OMB No. 1894-0001)?

Yes. In Column A (Research/Citation), you should provide the complete citation in APA, MLA, or other scholarly format. The citation should include the name(s) of the author(s), publication date, journal name or URL, title of study, and monograph or volume number, if applicable. If providing a URL, please ensure that the link is active, as Peer Reviewers are not permitted to consult outside sources when reviewing applications. Alternatively, you may also include a copy of the study or report in question. In Column B (Relevant Outcome[s]/Relevant Finding[s]), indicate the finding(s) of the study or report that is related to your project component (for example, “the study indicates that use of “A” mentoring program shows positive gains over “X” number of years/months.”) In Column C (Project Component/Overlap of Populations and/or Settings), indicate the project component that you are including based on the results of the study and the specific population(s) and setting(s) to which the intervention will be applied. For example, the “A” mentoring program has been found successful with [demographic/age/gender/grade level] students in [rural, urban, suburban] and/or [other] settings. For additional information, see the instructions and examples provided on Pages 2-4 of the Evidence Form.

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48. Is the logic model limited to one page?

No, the logic model is not limited to one page.

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49. Is there software available that can help IHEs build a logic model?

Yes, the Education Logic Model (ELM) application is a downloadable, browser-based application that will help you build a logic model by answering a series of questions.

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Last Modified: 07/08/2022