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Indian Education—Demonstration Grants for Indian Children

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2016 Frequently Asked Questions

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  1. Who is eligible for the Demonstration Grants?
  2. Who can participate in a partnership under the Native Youth Community Project priority?
  3. Can an entity other than the tribe (or its TEA) serve in the tribe’s place as a required partner in the partnership with an LEA or BIE-funded school?
  4. How is the NYCP priority different from Demonstration Grant priorities in the past?
  5. What can a grantee do with an NYCP grant?
  6. What age groups are served by an NYCP?
  7. How can an applicant meet the rural priority?
  8. Can a tribe apply if the community includes students from multiple tribes?
  9. Can an entity submit more than one application with different partners?
  10. Is an entity likely to be more successful with a tribal lead or LEA lead?
  11. My national Indian organization is considering applying for an NYCP grant and we represent tribes from multiple States. Are we eligible to apply?
  12. We are a small community with limited resources; should we still request the maximum award amount?
  13. What issues might prevent applications from being considered for funding?
  14. What is the definition of “community” and how does this definition relate to a defined local geographic area?
  15. What is the required needs assessment or other data analysis, and what purpose does it serve?
  16. Must an applicant hire a contractor to conduct a needs assessment?
  17. What is meant by “opportunities” in the definition of NYCP?
  18. How can an applicant develop a project based on the local needs assessment?
  19. How can an applicant involve “Indian tribes and parents of Indian children” in proposed activities?
  20. What does it mean to have a goal of college and career readiness as required by the definition of NYCP?
  21. What if our community supports readiness for careers in a subsistence economy?
  22. What are examples of existing resources in the definition of NYCP?
  23. What does “demonstrates the capacity to improve outcomes” mean?
  24. Do programs “funded through other sources” include philanthropic resources, as well as Federal, State, tribal, and local sources?
  25. What is a measurable objective?
  26. Must the NYCP Application Include a Logic Model?
  27. What is community collaborative effort and how can I demonstrate an increase?
  28. How do I know where to include the required NYCP elements in my application?
  29. Can a tribal college apply, if it has a school district or BIE-funded school as partner?
  30. What are the possible roles for IHEs in NYCPs?
  31. What costs are permitted under these grants?
  32. Can we include planning activities?
  33. What technical assistance (TA) will be available to applicants and grant recipients?
  34. Who must comply with the Indian Self Determination and Education Assistance Act (ISDEAA) hiring preference?
  35. My Indirect Cost Rate Agreement is scheduled to expire shortly after my award is made (i.e., on October 1 of this year). What should we do?

1. Who is eligible for the Demonstration Grants?

The entities that are eligible to apply for Demonstration Grants are Indian tribes, Indian organizations, Bureau of Indian Education (BIE)-funded schools, Indian institutions (including Indian institutions of higher education (IHEs)), State educational agencies (SEAs), local educational agencies (LEAs), and consortia of such entities. The term “BIE-funded schools” includes tribally-controlled schools funded by BIE, as well as individual BIE-operated schools.

All applications for the Native Youth Community Project (NYCP) priority under the Demonstration Grants competition must be submitted as part of a partnership, and the lead entity submitting the application must be one of these eligible entities. Under the absolute priority, the partnership must include at least one tribe or its tribal educational agency (TEA), and at least one LEA or BIE-funded school.

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2. Who can participate in a partnership under the Native Youth Community Project priority?

Any configuration of entities can participate in a partnership under the NYCP priority as long as: 1) the lead applicant is an eligible entity; 2) the partnership includes the required partners, which are at least one tribe (or its TEA) and at least one LEA or BIE-funded school; and 3) at least one partner has demonstrated capacity to improve student outcomes that are relevant to the project focus, in accordance with the definition of NYCP. (See questions 23 and 24 for more information about demonstrated capacity.) Each project may include any other optional entities that will be helpful for the project’s success. For example, community-based organizations may be included in a partnership agreement submitted by an eligible lead entity.

The number and variety of partners need to be adequate to meet the objectives of the project. The applicant must decide with which tribes, schools, and other organizations, such as Indian IHEs, they should partner based on the needs of the population of American Indian or Alaska Native (AI/AN) children to be served by the project. The capacity and resources of the partners, collectively, must be sufficient to implement the proposed activities.

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3. Can an entity other than the tribe (or its TEA) serve in the tribe’s place as a required partner in the partnership with an LEA or BIE-funded school?

Yes, a tribe can authorize an entity, such as a tribal college or other IHE, or a tribal non-profit organization, to serve in its place in the partnership. In such cases, the application must include a tribal resolution that authorizes the entity to take the place of the tribe and to apply for this particular grant on behalf of the tribe. For 2016, the tribal resolution should reference the FY 2016 NYCP competition. If so authorized by the tribe, the entity must partner with at least one LEA or BIE-funded school. However, if there is no such tribal resolution, a tribal college or tribal organization may be a part of a partnership that includes at least the two required partners, one tribe (or its TEA), and at least one LEA or BIE-funded school. Although not eligible to apply alone, such entities could play a major role in the proposed project.

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4. How is the NYCP priority different from Demonstration Grant priorities in the past?

The NYCP is a priority under the Demonstration Grants program under title VII (Indian education) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) (prior to amendment by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)). The NYCP priority allows the local community to choose a project focus based on a needs assessment or other data analysis as well as the areas the community identifies as having the biggest impact on improving outcomes for AI/AN youth. Prior to FY 2015, priorities under the Demonstration Grants program focused on school readiness and college preparatory programs. Under the NYCP priority, applicants may choose to focus on school readiness or college preparation, as long as that is the area the community has identified, through a needs assessment or other data analysis, as having the biggest impact on improving outcomes for AI/AN youth.

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5. What can a grantee do with an NYCP grant?

Activities under the NYCP priority must meet the purpose of the Demonstration Grants program, which is to develop, test, and demonstrate the effectiveness of services and programs to improve educational opportunities and achievement of AI/AN children. Therefore, while very broad, the scope of allowable activities under an NYCP are limited by statute (ESEA §7121(c)(1)). The beneficiaries of the Demonstration Grants must be Indian children (see definition of “Indian” in §263.20 of the regulations). Although it may be appropriate for an NYCP to focus on parents of AI/AN students (e.g., parental involvement in schools or a family literacy approach) as a strategy to increase college and career readiness of Indian students, a general community-wide program to alleviate the effects of poverty, for example, would be outside the scope of an NYCP.

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6. What age groups are served by an NYCP?

The term “youth” in Native Youth Community Project is not meant to limit the age groups of children served by the projects to adolescents. NYCP projects may address barriers experienced by AI/AN children from early childhood through the age limit for which the State provides free public education.

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7. How can an applicant meet the rural priority?

LEAs qualify for the rural priority if they are eligible for assistance under either of the Rural Education Achievement Programs (REAP), that is, Small Rural School Achievement (SRSA) and Rural and Low-Income Schools (RLIS). BIE-funded schools, which are not eligible for REAP, meet the rural priority if they are located in areas assigned Census locale codes 42 and 43.

The list of LEAs eligible for SRSA and RLIS is available on the REAP webpage on the Department’s website at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/reapsrsa/eligibility.html. Information on Census locale codes is available on the National Center for Education Statistics’ webpage on the Department’s web site at http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/rural_locales.asp.

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8. Can a tribe apply if the community includes students from multiple tribes?

Yes. We expect grantees to serve students from all tribes within an NYCP’s community. For schools that have students from multiple tribes with a presence in the community, we would encourage a tribe planning an NYCP application to consult with other relevant tribes. One option would be for all the affected tribes to be partners in the project. Another option is for the tribes in the community to agree to collaborate with the tribe or tribes that will serve as the project partner or partners.

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9. Can an entity submit more than one application with different partners?

An entity may be a partner in multiple applications. In fact, one entity can be the lead applicant on multiple applications. Each application will be separately screened to determine whether the application meets requirements, and will be separately reviewed and scored. The proposed projects should not refer to services or activities that would be provided by a project described in another application. Also, the resources of the partnering entities, including personnel, must be sufficient to cover the commitments in all proposed projects. In other words, each project must be able to be implemented, as written, regardless of whether another proposed project is funded or not.

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10. Is an entity likely to be more successful with a tribal lead or LEA lead?

For the fiscal year (FY) 2016 competition, we award four additional points under Competitive Preference Priority Two for applications with a tribal lead. The application should clearly designate the lead applicant, as well as the roles of each partner in the project. However, the selection criteria do not provide an advantage to one type of lead entity; rather, the selection criteria address the strength of the project described in the application and the quality of the project’s model.

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11. My national Indian organization is considering applying for an NYCP grant and we represent tribes from multiple States. Are we eligible to apply?

National Indian organizations are eligible to apply for an NYCP grant provided they meet the definition of Indian organization in 34 CFR § 263.20 (see definitions section, section B of the application). When deciding whether to apply for this community-based project, national Indian organizations should consider the location and diverse nature of the tribes, Indian communities, and membership they represent. For example, if an organization representing tribes in Oklahoma and in Alaska submits an application for a project serving those tribes, it would be difficult to meet the requirement of a “community-based” approach as required under an NYCP. In this situation, we highly recommend that the entity submit multiple applications focusing on the unique and diverse cultural differences of each community.

Remember that Indian organizations are eligible to apply, but must include a tribe or its TEA and an LEA or BIE-funded school as partners. If you are applying as an Indian organization, you must provide evidence that you meet that definition under Part 6, Other Attachments, of the application.

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12. We are a small community with limited resources; should we still request the maximum award amount?

The Department welcomes applicants from smaller communities. If a grant award in the estimated $500,000 to $1,000,000 range is larger than your community’s need, you are encouraged to request a smaller amount that is more appropriate for your circumstances. Under the selection criterion “Adequacy of resources,” applicants will be judged in part by the extent to which projected costs are reasonable in relation to the number of persons to be served and the anticipated results and benefits. Accordingly, a proper alignment between the size of the budget and the project described is important, and that may mean requesting an amount lower than the estimated average award or the estimated range of awards.

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13. What issues might prevent applications from being considered for funding?

The following are examples, but not an exhaustive list, of problems with grant applications that prevent an application from being considered for funding:

  • no partnership agreement included in application;
  • no tribal partner included in the agreement;
  • no LEA partner included in the agreement;
  • partnership agreement not signed;
  • budget exceeding 48 months;
  • project narrative not included in application;
  • application submitted in incorrect file type, including paper submission without prior approval; and
  • late submission.

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14. What is the definition of “community” and how does this definition relate to a defined local geographic area?

Community means a geographical area(s) where AI/AN students share similar needs and interests. Applicants should describe their rationale for selecting the boundaries of the project’s geographic area on the demonstrated needs of AI/AN students, and must include a description of the defined geographic area in Part 6, Other Attachments, of the application. The project must serve all AI/AN children or their families who are experiencing the identified barrier or barriers within the defined geographic area who share a demonstrated need. Resources and services must be directed toward identified need. Projects may not select a subpopulation of AI/AN children based on tribal affiliation. Projects may serve more than one geographic area where AI/AN students share similar demonstrated needs, but the project should still be focused on meeting community need.

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15. What is the required needs assessment or other data analysis, and what purpose does it serve?

The needs assessment or other data analysis identifies the local barriers, existing resources, and potential opportunities to support the college and career readiness of Indian children in the community to be served by the proposed NYCP. Evidence of the needs assessment or other data analysis is required in Part 6, Other Attachments, of the application. The data or needs assessment must relate to the defined geographic area and participant population. If the needs assessment is lengthy, applicants can upload a summary statement in lieu of the actual document. To conduct the needs assessment, each applicant should analyze data on their defined geographic area and participant population to identify and assess the barriers, opportunities, and resources for AI/AN students for college and career readiness, prior to applying for a grant. It is possible to use an existing analysis, as long as it has been completed within the last three years. This analysis can use existing data sources and applicants do not need to contract with an outside entity to conduct a needs assessment. However, the needs assessment or data analysis must be sufficiently detailed to identify and assess the barriers and opportunities facing the community.

After analyzing the community needs and opportunities, the applicant should choose the strategy or strategies that best address those needs or opportunities, based on factors that include the existing resources and the expertise of partners in the project. We expect that applicants will tailor their projects to address the significant need or opportunity identified by the applicant through the needs assessment.

The needs assessment will be reviewed under the selection criterion Need for Project. To ensure the peer reviewers have the information they need to rate applications, applicants should include a clear description of the evidence on needs, opportunities, and resources. The evidence from the needs assessment, however, informs the entire project and thus may affect aspects of the application evaluated under several selection criteria.

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16. Must an applicant hire a contractor to conduct a needs assessment?

No. Applicants are not required to hire a contractor to perform a needs assessment or data analysis. An applicant may conduct its own needs assessment or may use an existing needs assessment, as long as it was conducted for the same local community, was conducted within the last three years, and is relevant to the NYCP priority.

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17. What is meant by “opportunities” in the definition of NYCP?

The definition of NYCP requires that the project be informed by data on not only barriers but also “opportunities in the local community to support Indian students” and requires that the project be “focused on one or more barriers or opportunities.” In this context, “opportunities” means untapped resources or areas of success that might be used to address the needs of the community (e.g., expanding a program to encourage enrollment in advanced secondary school classes, providing extracurricular opportunities, such as debate led by tribal elders, community service activities reflective of the partnership’s strengths or many other possibilities).

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18. How can an applicant develop a project based on the local needs assessment?

The needs assessment or other data analysis will inform the strategy or strategies that best address the need or opportunity identified, based on factors that include the existing resources and the expertise of partners in the project. Applicants should tailor their projects to address the significant need or opportunity identified by the partnership. Due to increased funding compared to FY 2015, the Department expects to support more comprehensive projects that could include multiple strategies to reach a project’s objective. Applicants should describe how they selected the focus of their project and how they identified their resources and partners. Based on this information, applicants should propose the optimal way to address the need or opportunity by leveraging the available strengths and supports. In other words, the needs assessment informs the project focus, which informs the specific services to be provided, which informs the measurable objectives. Below is a sample worksheet that may be used to help determine the appropriate community-based focus for an NYCP application. The sample process may be adapted to fit the applicant’s needs. The worksheet may be downloaded from here: [download file] PDF13K


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19. How can an applicant involve “Indian tribes and parents of Indian children” in proposed activities?

In Part 6 of the application, “Other Attachments,” applicants must provide evidence of how both Indian tribes and parents have been, and will be, involved in developing and implementing the proposed activities. In addition, under the selection criterion “Quality of the management plan,” applications will be evaluated on the extent to which Indian tribes and parents of Indian children have been, and will be, involved in developing and implementing the proposed activities. For example, an applicant may submit evidence of consultation with parents regarding student needs for afterschool programming to satisfy the pre-application parent involvement requirement, and might submit a plan for acquiring feedback from parents throughout the grant period to satisfy the implementation involvement piece. The applicant could submit similar evidence with regard to tribal involvement, for example, evidence of strategy meetings with tribal leaders to develop the NYCP proposal, and planned meetings of the partnership, including tribal officials, throughout the grant period. If the tribe is the lead applicant, then it need only include evidence of parent involvement in developing and implementing the project.

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20. What does it mean to have a goal of college and career readiness as required by the definition of NYCP?

The goal of all NYCP projects must be to improve the college and career readiness of Indian students in the local community. Each applicant must develop its own objectives for reaching that goal based on the needs assessment. The objectives may address in- or out-of-school issues. For example, a community might choose the objective of increasing third grade reading scores, increasing graduation rates, or creating more culturally appropriate climates among the early learning programs in the community.

There are many different measures for being on track for college and careers depending on the present levels of performance and development of AI/AN children. Applicants are free to use the measure or measures that make sense for their respective communities.

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21. What if our community supports readiness for careers in a subsistence economy?

To participate in NYCP, the community’s needs assessment should reveal the barriers and opportunities for AI/AN youth, whether they want to participate fully in careers needed in the community or pursue postsecondary education and training. Communities with subsistence economies are encouraged to use the information gathered through the needs assessment, including their local resources, to consider how NYCP funding might introduce creative opportunities to prepare their AI/AN children to become lifelong adult contributors to the community, such as financial literacy and capability, legal and treaty negotiations, and effective language and communication.

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22. What are examples of existing resources in the definition of NYCP?

The NYCP definition requires applicants to examine existing resources in determining the best strategy to reach the project goal. These resources, for grants funded in 2016, could include existing funding sources also funded in 2016, such as the school district’s Title VII formula grant or Title I formula grant under the ESEA , and/or other Federal discretionary grants received by the district, tribe, or other organization. Additionally, philanthropic resources such as donations from private entities, and other sources could be leveraged for purposes in the approved application. Intellectual property may also be considered a valuable resource and may include the skills and knowledge of project partners. For example, if a tribe identified drug abuse as the greatest barrier to college and career readiness, and a local community organization has successfully started a program for middle school students to prevent drug use, that organization would be a valuable partner that could bring important resources to the project.

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23. What does “demonstrates the capacity to improve outcomes” mean?

Each eligible NYCP applicant must demonstrate that either the lead applicant or one of the partners in the project has the capacity to improve student outcomes that are relevant to the project focus. This must be demonstrated through prior experience with programs funded through other sources. The evidence of past success that is submitted does not need to meet What Works Clearinghouse standards. However, the evidence of past success must be relevant to the project focus.

For example, if a tribe partners with a local school district and the partnership determines that the greatest barrier to student outcomes is high-school dropout rates, the partnership may choose a strategy focused on the local middle school and high school that includes cultural competence training for teachers and a new after-school program. In that case, the tribe should not submit evidence of its past success in the Head Start program that it runs, because that is not directly related to the specific strategy chosen for its NYCP. However, after researching local or national programs that have evidence of success in lowering the drop-out rate, the partnership could add a partner that has experience and success with such a program. The evidence of past success does not need to be specific to AI/AN students, but if it is not, the program model chosen must be modified to be culturally appropriate.

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24. Do programs “funded through other sources” include philanthropic resources, as well as Federal, State, tribal, and local sources?

Yes. As noted in the answer to question 23, applicants must show that either the lead applicant or one of the partners has the demonstrated capacity to improve student outcomes that are relevant to the project focus, through prior experience with programs funded through other sources. We intend that applicants and their partners can describe this past experience with reference to programs funded from a wide range of sources, such as philanthropies, foundation grants, and State, local, or tribally-funded programs. Examples of Federal programs from which a partner can show evidence of success include grants funded through other offices in the Department (e.g., Office of Special Education Programs; Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education; and Office of Postsecondary Education) and through components of other departments (e.g., Head Start, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Indian Health Service, Temporary Aid for Needy Families, and Bureau of Indian Education).

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25. What is a measurable objective?

Measurable objectives state what will be done, to whom, by whom, when, and how it will be measured. Grantees must use measurable objectives to guide their work in carrying out the strategy chosen to meet the purpose of the program and reach the goal of the project. The measurable objectives indicate how the program will result in the increased college and career readiness of Indian children. The measurable objectives might be significant activities or benchmarked steps, on which projects will report data using the annual performance report. Data collection might be more frequent based on the project management and evaluation plans. Examples include: increase the number of students in rigorous coursework by 20%, provide every 4th grade student with an additional 2 hours of native language instruction, and increase the number of counseling slots by 25%.

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26. Must the NYCP Application Include a Logic Model?

No. In developing the project design, from the needs assessment to the completed application, applicants may find that a logic model is helpful in developing the project and aligning its parts. However, the application does not require a logic model.

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27. What is community collaborative effort and how can I demonstrate an increase?

One of the GPRA performance measures (see NIA section VI.4) is designed to assess successful place-based projects in terms of increased community participation and collaboration in the project. Although this element may be difficult to assess with objective measurable data, all projects can collect self-reported data on collaborative efforts. For example, a grantee could conduct a pre- and post-assessment by giving a survey at the start of the grant period and at the end of each grant year. The survey could be given to participating partner entities as well as parents, businesses, school staff, etc., and could contain questions about the status of collaboration around student outcomes, the perceived relationship between school district and tribe, and other indicators. The purpose of the Demonstration Grants program is to “develop, test, and demonstrate the effectiveness of services and programs to improve educational opportunities and achievement of Indian children.” Although NYCP is a direct services grant, we expect that collaboration among partners will facilitate capacity-building within the community, generating positive results and practices for student college- and career-readiness beyond the period of Federal financial assistance.

Grantees will report the data for GPRA measures in the annual performance report (APR) due at the end of each budget period. The Office of Indian Education (OIE) will aggregate the data across all projects to report on the program’s overall performance. Projects also include project-specific data on their APRs. OIE project staff will work with the directors of funded projects to ensure appropriate project-specific data are collected and reported.

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28. How do I know where to include the required NYCP elements in my application?

The NYCP absolute priority contains multiple submission requirements including verification of absolute priority focus. The table below will assist an applicant in determining if the applicant has addressed the appropriate NYCP absolute priority elements. The table may be downloaded from here: [download file] PDF13K


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29. Can a tribal college apply, if it has a school district or BIE-funded school as partner?

A tribal college or other Indian IHE can apply under the priority for NYCP if it is part of a partnership that also includes at least the two required partners (tribe and school). Under such a partnership, the tribal college could play a major role in the proposed project. The only situation in which a tribal college could apply without the tribe as partner is if the application includes a tribal resolution that authorizes the tribal college to apply for this specific grant on behalf of the tribe. For 2016, the tribal resolution should reference the FY 2016 NYCP competition.

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30. What are the possible roles for IHEs in NYCPs?

IHEs, including Native American Serving Non-tribal Institutions, can be vital partners in a NYCP; an Indian IHE can be a lead applicant. Although postsecondary education, training, or employment services are not allowable uses of funds under NYCP, an IHE could provide direct services to AI/AN youth. For example, an IHE could provide secondary transition services, offered to school-aged AI/AN children, that prepare them for postsecondary education, training, or employment. An IHE may partner with the tribe and school to provide dual enrollment for youth in secondary school. Also, the IHE might supervise internships for their pre-service teacher trainees, who implement project activities, such as before and after school programs for AI/AN children.

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31. What costs are permitted under these grants?

Applicants are responsible for ensuring that the costs stipulated in their proposed budget are reasonable, allocable, and necessary for addressing the proposed project effectively. The application must adequately describe the rationale for the proposed activities and their costs. In other words, an activity and its cost might be reasonable, allowable, and allocable in one project, but not in another. Applicants should review the cost principles, particularly the guidance concerning “reasonable,” “allocable,” and “necessary” costs. The uniform administrative requirements and cost principles are published in 2 CFR part 200, which is available on the U.S. Government Printing Office website at 2 CFR part 200.

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32. Can we include planning activities?

No. NYCP grants are to support implementation of proposed projects, and grant funds may not be used for planning purposes prior to implementation. In fact, we recommend that applicants propose activities that can begin immediately upon funding and will result in early tangible successes. However, as part of capacity-building efforts related to grant implementation, grantees may use funds to regularly collect and review performance and outcome data in order to improve the implementation of the project.

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33. What technical assistance (TA) will be available to applicants and grant recipients?

The Office of Indian Education (OIE) will broadcast a series of pre-application webinars after the NIA is published in the Federal Register. The pre-application TA, including these webinars, will support potential applicants as they consider how to develop partnerships, how to conduct a local needs assessment, and how to design activities that address the barriers to display the relationship between the activities and desired changes/improvements.

After grants are awarded, OIE will provide on-going TA to grant recipients. This TA will support projects to work in, and with, tribal communities to improve student achievement, build the capacity of existing organizations and institutions, conduct community outreach, gain stakeholder buy-in, and refine strategies for reaching the project objectives.

The link to the 2016 pre-application TA webinars will be located here.

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34. Who must comply with the Indian Self Determination and Education Assistance Act (ISDEAA) hiring preference?

NYCP grants that are primarily for the benefit of members of federally-recognized tribes are subject to the provisions of section 7(b) of the ISDEAA (Pub. L. 93-638). That section requires that, to the greatest extent feasible, a grantee—

    (i) Give to Indians preferences and opportunities for training and employment in connection with the administration of the grant; and
    (ii) Give to Indian organizations and to Indian-owned economic enterprises, as defined in section 3 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 (25 U.S.C. 1452(e)), preference in the award of contracts in connection with the administration of the grant.

A federally-recognized tribe that receives a NYCP grant is subject to the hiring preference. If such a tribe partners with an SEA or LEA or any other entity, that entity would be subject to the hiring preference when using NYCP funds. However, a State-recognized tribe generally would not be subject to this hiring preference.

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35. My Indirect Cost Rate Agreement is scheduled to expire shortly after my award is made (i.e., on October 1 of this year). What should we do?

NYCP applicants that include indirect costs in their budget need to be aware of when their Indirect Cost Rate Agreement is due to expire. If the current rate expires prior to the start of the first grant year, ED will attach special conditions to the grant, under which the grantee has the option of not charging indirect costs, or of using a temporary ED rate until the grantee obtains a new rate from its cognizant agency. There is another option for grantees that have never had an indirect cost rate. For further information about indirect costs, see the section under Part 5 of the application entitled “Important Information Regarding Indirect Costs.”

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Last Modified: 02/26/2016