A r c h i v e d  I n f o r m a t i o n

Citizenship and Values

Indicator 53.

Volunteer Work

Youths were much less likely to participate in volunteer activities than older adults. In 1988-89, about 13 percent of 16- to 19-year- olds and 11 percent of 20- to 24-year-olds were volunteers compared with 29 percent of 35- to 44-year-olds. Young adults also volunteered fewer weeks per year than the older volunteers.

Volunteer workers for schools and other organizations, by age: Year ending May 1989

Volunteer workers for schools and other organizations, by age: Year ending May 1989


Indicator 54.

Religion

The proportion of high school seniors who attend religious services every week showed little change between 1976 and 1980, but then declined from 43 percent in 1980 to 31 percent in 1991. This pattern was mirrored to some extent by the changes in the proportion who felt that religion was "very important" or "pretty important" in their lives, which dropped from 65 percent in 1980 to 58 percent in 1991.

Religious involvement of high school seniors: 1976 to 1991

Religious involvement of high school seniors: 1976 to 1991


Indicator 55.

Values

As in 1980, high school sophomores of 1990 believed in the value of work, marriage and a family, and leisure time, although fewer students said these values were very important to them. Sophomores in 1990 placed more value on money and having children than their counterparts ten years earlier, and fewer believed that good luck was more important than hard work.

Self-perceptions and values of high school sophomores: 1980 and 1990

Perceptions and values of high school sophomores: 1980 and 1990


Indicator 56.

Attitudes Compared with Parents' Views

High school seniors of 1991 agreed more with their parents on three out of ten important topics than seniors in 1975. The level of agreement remained about the same for six other areas, and decreased in only one area, "how to spend money." Most seniors (86 percent) agreed with their parents on the value of an education. Less than half of the seniors were in agreement with their parents on how to spend money, and what is permitted on a date.

Percent of high school seniors indicating that they agree with their parents on selected topics: 1975 to 1991

Percent of high school seniors indicating that they agree with their parents on selected topics: 1975 and 1991


Indicator 57.

Arrests

The number of arrests per 1,000 of 14- to 17- year-olds increased 15 percent between 1989 and 1990. Moreover, arrest rates for young adults between 14 and 24 years old were much higher in 1990 than two or three decades earlier. In 1950, there were only 13 arrests per 1,000 for 18- to 24-year-olds. By 1990 the rate was 126 per 1,000. Most of the increase in the arrest rates occurred between 1950 and 1980. Since 1980, the rates have fluctuated.

Number of arrests per 1,000 persons, by age: 1950 to 1990

Number of arrests per 1,000 persons, by age: 1950 to 1990


Indicator 58.

Types of Crime

In 1990, about 57 percent of those arrested for serious crimes were under 25 years old. The number of arrests per 1,000 young adults 18 to 24 years old nearly doubled between 1969 and 1990. The largest percentage increase was in arrests for drunk driving which climbed from 3 per 1,000 to 13 per 1,000 between 1969 and 1990. Other large increases occurred in arrests for larceny and theft, assault, fraud, drug abuse, and liquor law violations.

Persons arrested, by type of charge and age: 1969, 1979, and 1990

Number of arrests of 18- to 24-year-olds per 1,000 persons, by type of crime: 1969, 1979, and 1990

Health Table of Contents Future


[ Home ]