A r c h i v e d  I n f o r m a t i o n

U.S. Department of Education FY 1999 Annual Plan - February 27, 1998

School Improvement


Eisenhower Professional Development Program -- $335,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve the quality of classroom teaching through professional development.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Classroom instruction is improved through effective professional development . 1.1 Teachers' skills and classroom instruction. By 1998, over 50% of a sample of teachers will show evidence that participation in Eisenhower-assisted professional development has resulted in an improvement in their knowledge and skills, and by 1999 in an improvement in classroom instruction. 1.1 National Eisenhower (Ike) Evaluation, 1998-2000. • This program directly supports ED's Strategic Objectives 1.4, 2.2, and 2.3 by providing opportunities for teachers to improve their knowledge, skills, and teaching practice in order to help students achieve high standards of academic performance.

• Disseminate and discuss ED's Mission and Principles of High-Quality Professional Development.

2. High-quality professional development and state policy are aligned with high state content and student performance standards. 2.1 District-level professional development. By 1998, over 50% of teachers participating in district-level or higher education Eisenhower-assisted professional development will participate in activities that are aligned with high standards. By 2000, over 75% will. 2.1 National Ike Evaluation, 1998; related information from periodic state performance reports, 2000. • Work with professional organizations such as the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) to develop strategies for encouraging states to link professional development to high state standards.

• Disseminate information to Eisenhower state coordinators on aligning professional development with high state content and student performance standards.

3. Professional development is sustained, intensive, and high-quality and has a lasting impact on classroom instruction. 3.1 High quality. By 1998, over 50% of teachers participating in district-level, Eisenhower-assisted professional development activities will participate in activities reflecting best practices, including a focus on continuous improvement. By 2000, over 75 percent will.

3.2 Intensity. By 1998, 35% of teachers participating in district-level Eisenhower-assisted activities will participate in activities that are a component of professional development that extends over the school year; by 2000, over 50% will.

3.1 National Ike Evaluation, 1998; related information from periodic state performance reports, 2000.

3.2 National Ike Evaluation, 1998; related information from periodic state performance reports, 2000.

• Produce and disseminate a publication on exemplary models for professional development programs that receive Eisenhower funding.

• Continue to work with the National Science Foundation (NSF) to share information on best practices.

• Through technical assistance workshops, program guidance, and ED's integrated review team (IRT) visits, the states are encouraged to adopt and report on strategies that promote professional development activities that extend over the school year and assist in reaching the states' reform efforts.

4. High-quality professional development is provided to teachers who work with disadvantaged populations. 4.1 High-poverty schools. The proportion of teachers participating in Eisenhower-assisted activities who teach in high-poverty schools will exceed the proportion of the national teacher pool who teach in high-poverty schools.

4.2 Context (not limited to any single program): Teachers. Teachers in high-poverty schools (with high concentrations of Title I, Part A services) will participate in intensive, sustained, high quality professional development at rates comparable to or higher than the rates for teachers in other schools. The 1994 SASS shows that 36% of teachers in high-poverty public schools participated in professional development programs focusing on in-depth study in their subject field, compared with 30% for teachers in low-poverty schools.

4.1 National Ike Evaluation, 1998; related information from periodic state performance reports, 2000.

4.2 NCES' Schools & Staffing Survey (SASS) 1994; NCES Fast Response Survey 1996-98.

• Continue to promote the involvement of teachers from high-poverty schools and underrepresented populations.

• Review needs assessment plans required of each LEA to ensure that teachers from high-poverty schools are included in long-term, sustained, and intensive professional development.

5. Effective management of the Eisenhower Program at the federal, state, and local levels supports systemic reform. 5.1 Federal guidance and assistance. The number of Eisenhower state coordinators who report that ED guidance and assistance are timely and helpful will increase.

5.2 Integrated state planning and collaboration. By 1998, 50% of all states will have developed performance indicators for integrated professional development across programs (including Eisenhower) in order to support systemic reform and will have data collection systems in place; by 2000, 75% will have.

5.1 Office of the Under Secretary's Planning and Evaluation Service (PES) Survey of State Federal Program Administrators, 1998.

5.2 Office of the Under Secretary's Planning and Evaluation Service (PES) Survey of State Federal Program Administrators, 1998; related information from periodic state performance reports, 1999, 2000.

• Through technical assistance workshops, ensure accurate interpretation of the program statute, including new requirements and how they are to be implemented at the state and local levels.

• Communicate program expectations between all entities (Federal, state, and local).

• Provide technical assistance to states on performance indicators for state and local programs.


Innovative Education Program Strategies (Block Grant) (Title VI, ESEA) -- $0 (FY 99)
Goal: To support state and local efforts to accomplish promising education reform programs.
Objectives Indicators Data Source Strategies
1. Increase the percentage of Title VI funded activities that support local education reform efforts. 1.1 Reform efforts. The use of Title VI funds will show evidence that the activities supported are integral to achieving district reform plans. 1.1 Title VI Annual Reports, 1998; Targeting and Resource Allocation Study, 1998. • Make presentations at regional and national meetings to assist Title VI coordinators in ensuring that program funds are used in a manner consistent with state and local reform plans.

• Provide coordinators with information on activities, aligned with the purposes of the program, that have been proved effective.

2. Effective management of the Title VI program supports systemic reform at the federal, state and local levels. 2.1 Quality ED service. State and local educational agencies will report that technical assistance and other services provided by ED and federal assistance providers are useful and of high quality.

2.2 Quality State implementation. Title VI state coordination, monitoring, and assistance will show that the program is integrated in state activities to advance state reform agendas.

2.1 Baseline Crosscutting Survey of State Implementation of Federal Programs, 1997 and Followup Crosscutting State Survey, 1998. • Continue professional development of Office of Elementary and Secondary employees to develop expertise in principles and practices of education reform.

• Ensure that technical assistance and other services by ED staff are useful and of high quality through responding to feedback provided by state and local program administrators during ED Integrated Review Team visits will.


Safe and Drug-free Schools Program -- $606,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To help ensure that all schools are safe, disciplined, and drug free by promoting implementation of high-quality drug and violence prevention programs.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
Outcomes
1. Reduce alcohol and drug use and availability in schools. 1.1 Drug use in schools. Rates of alcohol and drug use (alcohol, marijuana, tobacco) in schools will slow and begin to fall by 2000.

1.2 Drugs offered in schools. The number of students who are offered illegal drugs at school will decrease. 1992 levels were 10%, 18% and 23% for grades 8, 10, and 12.

1.1 Monitoring the Future (MTF), 1997 (students in grades 8, 10, and 12 use of alcohol, marijuana, tobacco measured.)

1.2 MTF, 1997.

• Identify and publicize promising prevention programs and strategies.
2. Reduce number of criminal and violent incidents in schools. 2.1 Violent incidents in schools. The number of criminal and violent incidents in school (by students) will show continuous decreases between now and 2002.

2.2 Weapons in schools. The number of weapons and firearms carried to school will decrease. In 1993 12% of high school students carried weapon on school property.

2.3 Attacks on teachers. The number of physical attacks, threats on teachers will decrease. 2% of teachers were physically attacked; 8% were threatened.

2.4 School-related homicides. The number of school-related homicides will decrease. CDC/ED study: 85 school-associated homicides were reported in 1992-1994.

2.5 Disruptive behavior. The number of students whose learning is occasionally interfered with by misbehaving students will decrease. In 1992, 53% of students in grades 8 and 10 had their learning occasionally interfered with by other misbehaving students.

2.1 National Crime Survey, 1997; MTF, 1997 (threatened, injured, and theft.)

2.2 Center for Disease Control's (CDC) biennial Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), 1997.

2.3 MTF, 1997.

2.4 Study needs to be conducted for 1998/99 and interim, if possible.

2.5 MTF, 1997.

• Identify and publicize promising prevention programs and strategies.

• Host conference for SEAs, governors, and large SEAs to showcase promising programs.

• Collaborate with Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) on the truancy and hate crimes initiatives and on assistance to schools in violence prevention activities.

• Provide training and technical assistance, in collaboration with the Department of Justice and HHS, to SEAs and LEAs on effective prevention strategies.

• Develop, with DOJ, the President's Annual Report Card on School Violence.

3. Reduce alcohol and drug use among school-age youth. 3.1 Drug use by school-aged children. Rates of alcohol and drug use among school-aged children will slow and begin to fall by 2000.

3.2 Tolerance toward drugs. The percentage of students reporting tolerant attitudes toward drug and alcohol use will decline significantly between now and 2002.

3.1 MTF, 1997 (marijuana, cocaine, LSD, heroin, meth, tobacco, and alcohol); National Household Education Survey, 1998

3.2 MTF, 1997.

• Identify and publicize promising prevention programs and strategies.
Quality programs and services
4. Assist Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) to implement effective drug and violence prevention programs through National Programs. 4.1 Higher education. By 1999, the National Programs will provide technical assistance to all IHEs about models for effective drug and violence prevention programs. 4.1 Periodic review of ED files. • Provide technical assistance on effective programs.

• Conduct grant competitions to develop, validate, and disseminate model programs and strategies.

5. Assist LEAs to align their programs with ED's Principles of Effectiveness for Prevention Programs through both state formula grants and National Programs. Programs must be tied to a needs assessment, have goals that are measureable and tied to outcomes, be research based, and be evaluated periodically. 5.1 Principles of effectiveness. By 1999, all LEAs will use prevention programs that are based on the Principles of Effectiveness.

5.2 Coordinators. By 2000, all drug and violence prevention coordinators funded by the middle school coordinator initiative will implement effective, research-based programs, in accordance with the Principles of Effectiveness.

5.1 Survey, to be developed, 1999.

5.2 Planned evaluation.

• Develop and promulgate Principles of Effectiveness for Prevention Programs.

• Develop guidance and provide technical assistance to states and LEAs in how to apply the principles.

• Identify and publicize promising prevention programs and strategies.

• Provide training and technical assistance to prevention coordinators for middle schools.

6. Ensure that LEAs enforce the Gun-Free Schools Act. 6.1 Gun-Free Schools Act notifications and expulsions. By 1997 all LEAs receiving ESEA funds will have policies requiring the expulsion of students who bring firearms to school and requiring notification of law enforcement. 6.1 Gun-Free Schools Act data collection, 1997. • Use monitoring and technical assistance to ensure LEA compliance.
7. Assist LEAs to set policies prohibiting the sale, distribution, and use of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco products at school or at school-sponsored functions. 7.1 School policies. By 1997 all LEAs will have policies prohibiting the sale, distribution, and use of alcohol and other drugs at school or at school-sponsored functions and activities.

7.2 The Pro-Children Act. All LEAs have policies prohibiting smoking in school.

7.1 ED/LEA survey, supplemented with data from SHPPS Survey, 1997.

7.2 HHS/CDC School Health Policies and Programs Report, 1997.

• Develop policy for ensuring that "medical marijuana" is kept out of all schools, and disseminate policy to all SEAs.

• Identify school districts not in compliance and provide technical assistance to ensure compliance.

8. Improve the quality and use of state and local performance data through both state formula grant and National Programs. 8.1 State surveys. By 1999 all states will conduct periodic statewide surveys or collect statewide data on student alcohol and drug use and incidents of crime and violence in schools.

8.2 State performance indicators. By July 1997 all SEA and governors' programs will have acceptable performance indicators.

8.3 Approval of LEA applications. All states will use performance indicators to make decisions regarding approval of LEA application for FY 1997 funding.

8.4 LEA program improvement. LEAs will routinely use performance indicators to determine whether activities should be continued or modified.

8.1 ED/SDFS Survey, 1998.

8.2 Review of ED files, 1997.

8.3 ED/SDFS Survey, 1998.

8.4 ED/LEA Survey, 1998.

• Develop discretionary grant program to improve SEAs' capacity to collect and analyze data.

• Withhold approval of state plans without performance indicators. Provide technical assistance to SEAs that are unable to develop appropriate indicators.

• Identify school districts not in compliance and provide technical assistance to ensure compliance.

Federal administration (Safe and Drug Free Schools office)
9. Provide high-quality products and technical assistance that helps align local programs with Principles of Effectiveness through National Programs. 9.1 Technical assistance. By 1998, the National Programs will provide technical assistance to all SEAs and LEAs about models for effective drug and violence prevention programs. 9.1 Periodic review of ED files. • Hold a conference for SEAs, governors' offices, and large LEAs on what works; publicize proceedings.

• Conduct grant competitions to identify model programs and support replication of effective programs.

• Use the Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program (SDFSP) web page to make SEAs, LEAs, and schools aware of promising practices.


Inexpensive Book Distribution -- $13,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To provide programs that promote literacy skills and motivate children to read, including the distribution of inexpensive books to children.
Objective Indicator Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Support the goals of the America Reads Challenge and the U.S. Department of Education's priority of having children read independently and well by the end of the grade 3 and the literacy development of young people through grade 12 by supporting and promoting the establishment of reading motivation programs through Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) projects. 1.1 Increase in numbers of children served and books distributed by RIF projects. The number of children served and books distributed by RIF projects will increase annually. In FY 1997, RIF served 1,982,000 children and distributed 6,343,000 books.

1.2 Financial self-sufficiency. In order to use federal funds to support the implementation of additional local RIF projects, the federal share of funds that support existing RIF projects will decrease over time. Currently there are 2,000 organizations on a waiting list to implement local RIF projects.

1.3 Promote community literacy efforts. RIF projects will increasingly engage in partnership activities and work to promote broad-based community support for, and involvement in, literacy projects. A 1992 evaluation found that 80% of local RIF projects were operated by schools, districts, and PTA organizations. The goal is to involve a broader array of community actors, volunteers, and supporting groups in RIF projects.

1.1 Annual Performance Reports, 1997.

1.2 Annual Performance Reports, 1997.

1.3 Evaluation of the Inexpensive Book Distribution Program, 1992; Annual Performance Reports, 1997.

• Encourage grantees to broaden and strengthen community partnerships to ensure lasting financial sufficiency.

• Encourage grantee to coordinate project efforts with local Title I, Migrant Education, Even Start, and America Reads Challenge: Read*Write*Now programs.

2. Serve children with special needs* through Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) projects.

* Children with special needs are defined as children at risk of school failure, disabled and homeless children, children of migrant families, institutionalized and incarcerated children, or children of institutionalized or incarcerated parents.

2.1 Children with special needs. An increasing percentage of children served by RIF will be those with special needs. Currently, approximately 67% of children served by RIF projects have special needs. 2.1 Annual Performance Reports, 1997. • Provide technical assistance and advice to grantee on effective ways to reach out to underserved, at-risk, and special needs children.

• Encourage grantee to coordinate project efforts with local Title I, Migrant Education, Even Start, and America Reads Challenge: Read*Write*Now programs.


Arts Education -- $10,500,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To promote, improve, and enhance arts education and cultural activities for elementary and secondary students.
Objective Indicator Source and Next Update Strategies
1.Activities supported with federal funds will serve an increasing proportion of students with disabilities or students who would not otherwise have access to cultural activities. 1.1 Outreach. Outreach efforts supported by the Kennedy Center will reach a greater number of communities, particularly in urban, rural, and socioeconomically disadvantaged areas.

1.2 Outreach. Very Special Arts will expand the number of affiliates and partnerships that it supports to provide arts education; and its use of technology will increase access to the arts for students with disabilities. Planned for FY 1998.

1.1 Annual performance reports, 1998.

1.2 Annual performance reports, 1998.

• Provide technical assistance and advice to grantees on effective ways to reach underserved, at-risk, and special needs students.
2. Grantee activities will emphasize improvement regarding the quality of arts education programs by accentuating professional development and the development of curriculum materials. 2.1 Quality of services. Grantees will create, revise, and disseminate high-quality professional development activities and curriculum materials tied to challenging standards annually. 2.1 Annual performance reports, 1998. • Provide information to grantee about effective teacher training practices.

• Provide arts education resources, developed by grantees, to schools through the use of technology.


Magnet Schools Assistance Program -- $101,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To assist in the desegregation of schools served by local educational agencies.
Objective Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Federally funded magnet programs eliminate, reduce, or prevent the incidence and/or the degree of minority student isolation in targeted schools. 1.1 Minority group isolation:
  • Targeted schools will eliminate, reduce, or prevent minority group isolation according to their objective.
  • Magnet programs will not have a significant adverse impact on the racial composition of feeder schools.

1.2 Minority/nonminority distribution. Magnet curricular activities generally will reflect the same minority/nonminority distribution as the magnet school (or program within school [PWS]).

1.1 Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

1.2 MSAP applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

• Provide pre- and postaward technical assistance to applicants and grantees.

• Use monitoring and program reports to identify grantees experiencing difficulty in meeting their desegregation objectives, implementing reforms, carrying out innovative themes, or strengthening students' knowledge, and provide technical assistance to these grantees.

2. Federally funded magnet programs or innovative programs (5111) promote national, state, and local systemic reforms and are aligned with challenging state content and student performance standards. 2.1 National, state, and local reforms. Programs play an active role in planning and implementing national, state, and local reforms.

2.2 State content and performance standards. Project designs will explicitly provide evidence of the use of challenging state content and student performance standards. These are reflected in the program curriculum and in planned student assessments aligned to the curriculum.

2.1 MSAP applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

2.2 MSAP applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

• See Objective 1 strategies.
3. Federally funded magnet programs or innovative programs (5111) feature innovative educational methods and practices that meet identified student needs and interests. 3.1 Innovative themes. Programs will incorporate innovative themes and elements that meet identified student needs and interests.

3.2 Innovative educational methods and practices. Programs will incorporate innovative educational methods and practices that promote student achievement.

3.1 MSAP applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

3.2 MSAP applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

• See Objective 1 strategies.
4. Federally funded magnet programs or innovative programs (5111) strengthen students' knowledge of academic subjects and skills needed for successful careers in the future. 4.1 Improved student achievement. Students will show achievement gains in core subjects, as well as in applied learning skills, that meet or exceed the gains for students in the district as a whole. (Applied learning skills include higher-order-thinking skills, individual problem-solving ability, communication skills, computer skills, and ability to contribute to group projects.)

4.2 Vocational skills. (Optional for federally funded magnet schools, PWSs, or innovative projects that do not feature development of specialized skills) Students will demonstrate knowledge and proficiency in vocational skills related to the magnet theme.

4.1 MSAP applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

4.2 MSAP applications, FY 1998; MSAP annual project reports, beginning FY 1999; MSAP Evaluation, 2000.

• See Objective 1 strategies.
5. Innovative programs (5111) assist in the desegregation of schools through effective strategies other than magnet schools and through parent and community involvement. 5.1 Assist in desegregation. Innovative programs involving strategies (other than magnet schools) such as neighborhood schools, or community model schools organized around a special emphasis, theme, or concept will measurably assist in the desegregation of schools.

5.2 Parental and community involvement. Projects will incorporate practices that support extensive parental and community involvement that are related to the program model (e.g., neighborhood school, community model school) being implemented.

5.1 Innovative Programs (5111) applications, FY 1999; Innovative Programs annual project reports, beginning FY 2000.

5.2 Innovative Programs (5111) applications, FY 1999; Innovative Programs annual project reports, beginning FY 2000.

• See Objective 1 strategies.


Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Program -- $30,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To ensure access of homeless children and youth to the same free, appropriate public education, including a public preschool education, as is provided to other children and youth.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Access of homeless children and youth to equitable public education will improve. 1.1 Public schools. An increasing percentage of homeless children and youth will enroll in public schools.

1.2 All federal and state programs. An increasing number of homeless children and youth will have access to all federal programs and state-sponsored academic programs.

1.3 Eliminating barriers. Decreasing numbers of states will report transportation, immunization, and residency requirements as barriers to access to education.

1.4 Preschool-age children. Increased percentage of preschool-age homeless children will be enrolled in preschool programs.

1.1 Triennial State Data Collection Report ["Triennial Report"], 1998.

1.2 Triennial Report; Follow-up to the National Evaluation, 1999.

1.3 Triennial Report, 1998; Follow-up to the National Evaluation, 1999.

1.4 Triennial Report, 1998.

• Promote SEA awareness of the need to improve access to education for homeless children by encouraging the Title I and Homeless program coordinators to work together to meet the needs of homeless children and youth.

• Require state Homeless program coordinators to ensure that LEAs have designated local homeless liaisons.

• Disseminate successful practices through national conferences, regional meetings, publications, and site visits.

• Disseminate information and guidance on the statutory requirement for the inclusion of services to homeless preschool-age children under the Act.

2. Opportunities of homeless children and youth to meet the same challenging state student performance standards to which all students are held will improve. 2.1 Achievement data. Increased number of LEAs will report that they collect data on the achievement of homeless children and youth.

2.2 Success. Increased number of LEAs will report to the state that the educational performance of homeless children and youth is improving.

2.1 Triennial Report, 1998; Follow-up to the National Evaluation, 1999.

2.2 Same as 2.1.

• Assist SEAs and LEAs in developing and implementing plans to systematically increase achievement of homeless children and youth by providing SEAs with technical assistance from Comprehensive Regional Assistance Centers (CACs).
3. States will provide improved guidance and technical assistance and identify and will disseminate reliable information on effective approaches to serving homeless children and youth. 3.1 Coordination. An increasing number of states will report program coordination that can be used to encourage federal, state, and local policy makers and administrators to improve Homeless program services. 3.1 Follow-up to the National Evaluation, 1998; Triennial Report, 1999. • Disseminate successful practices through national conferences, regional meetings, publications, and site visits.


Women's Educational Equity Act Program (WEEA) -- $3,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To promote equity in education for women and girls in the United States.
Objective Indicator Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Promote gender equity in education to ensure that girls and women have educational opportunities comparable to those available to boys and men. 1.1 LEA implementation. Increasing percentages of LEAs will adopt research-based curriculum, policies, and practices that ensure gender equity in education. 1.1 Annual Performance Reports, 1999. • SIP staff will coordinate with the Resource Center to disseminate current gender equity materials and resources, and technical assistance on their use.
2. Increase awareness of gender equity problems in education. 2.1 Awareness. Increasing numbers of LEAs will receive information and technical assistance on strategies that address gender equity problems in education. 2.1 WEEA Resource Center Report, 1999. • SIP staff will coordinate with the WEEA Resource Center to disseminate information and provide technical information on gender equity problems in education.
3. Promote training activities that prepare educators to meet the needs of women and girls, including those who suffer from multiple forms of discrimination (i.e., sex, race, ethnic origin, limited English proficiency, disability, or age). 3.1 Training strategies. Increasing numbers of educators will receive gender equity training, including training that deals with multiple forms of discrimination. 3.1 Annual Performance Reports, 1999; WEEA Resource Center Report, 1999. • SIP staff will coordinate with the WEEA Resource Center to disseminate information on effective training techniques and promising practices for equity in education.


Title IV of the Civil Rights Act: Equity Assistance Center Program -- $8,300,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To support access and equity in public schools and help school districts to solve equity problems in education related to race, gender, and national origin.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Provide high-quality technical assistance and training to public school districts in addressing equity in education. 1.1 Addressing educational problems. An increasing percentage of Equity Assistance Center (EAC) technical assistance services address problems directly related to opportunities for special populations affected by problems in equity related to race, gender, or national origin, to meet or exceed the same standards established for all students in a State or school district.

1.2 Training in capacity building. School districts will annually expand their own capacity to cope effectively with special educational problems occasioned by problems in equity as a result of training activities provided by EACs.

1.1 EAC annual performance reports, 1999.

1.2 EAC annual performance reports, 1999; project monitoring records, annual, 1999; EAC follow-up surveys on impact of training, annual, 1999.

• Conduct timely communication of ED information regarding strategies to ensure that all students have opportunities to meet high standards.

• Encourage districts implementing school choice and other programs to consider assistance that is available from EACs in the formulation of their strategies to improve equality of student access and involvement in high quality instructional programs.

• Disseminate information and provide regular updates from Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Office of the General Council (OGC), and other appropriate sources on issues regarding equity in education to EACs.

2. Develop an effective collaborative working relationship with other technical assistance providers to ensure that equity needs are addressed. 2.1 Collaboration with other technical assistance providers. As a result of coordination activities, appropriate referrals and joint technical assistance activities with research institutions and other technical assistance providers will increase annually. 2.1 EAC annual performance reports, 1999. • Create or expand both regional and national networks of technical assistance providers through joint meetings and other activities.

• Maintain lists of all technical assistance providers on ED web site.

• Invite other technical assistance providers to meetings of EAC directors to expand directors' knowledge of resources and mandates of the other TA providers.


Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program -- $0 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve participants' knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding the three branches of government
Objective Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. To implement a program to increase student's knowledge and skills in civic participation , with emphasis on special needs students. 1.1 Students from targeted groups. Each year, an increasing percentage of participants will be special needs students (e.g., those with disabilities, ethnic minority, and migrant).

1.2 Outreach to schools. Students from rural areas, small towns, and urban areas will participate. Increasing numbers of rural schools that participate each year.

1.3 Student knowledge. Students will demonstrate an increased understanding of the democratic process.

1.1 Grantee's analysis, 1999.

1.2 Grantee's annual reports, 1999.

1.3 Grantee analysis of student and teacher surveys. (Planned for 1998-99; data available 1999)

• Disseminate information about the program to SEAs, LEAs in rural areas/small towns, and technical assistance providers.

• Encourage grantee to allocate more student fellowships to schools with high proportions of special needs students.

2. Increase the impact of the Ellender program through teacher training, educational materials, and development of civic education programs. 2.1 Teacher use of materials. More teachers will use materials prepared by grantee.

2.2 Development of civic education programs. More teachers will use information and strategies from grantees professional development program to organize civic education programs.

2.1 Grantee site visits, 1999.

2.2 Grantee site visits, 1999.

• Provide information about effective teacher training and related practices.
3. Make progress toward full financial independence from federal funding. 3.1 Increased private funding. An increasing percentage of grantees' funding will come from nonfederal sources. 3.1 Annual audit and grantee reports; first available 1998. • Work with grantee to develop and refine plans for obtaining funding from nonfederal sources.


Native Hawaiian Education Program -- $18,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To assist the Native Hawaiian population achieve to challenging standards through supporting supplemental programs that meet their unique needs.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Native Hawaiian students served will enter school ready to learn and will progress at rates similar to all students in achievement. 1.1 Children's school readiness. Increasing percentages of Native Hawaiian children served will improve on measures of school readiness and literacy relative to the Native Hawaiian population as a whole.

1.2 Student achievement. Increasing percentages of students will meet or exceed the academic goals that are established by the state or on national assessments.

1.1 Annual performance reports, 1999.

1.2 Annual performance reports, 1999.

• OESE staff will share information obtained from other ED programs with similar objectives.
2. Parents and teachers will have access to instructional resources that meet the unique educational needs of Native Hawaiian students. 2.1 Curriculum development. The curriculum developed by grantees will incorporate the Native Hawaiian culture and language, and the contributions of Native Hawaiians.

2.2 Professional Development. The number of teachers of Native Hawaiian students who will be prepared to address Native Hawaiians' unique needs will increase each year.

2.3 Parent involvement. Increasing percentages of parents and guardians of Native Hawaiian students will participate in educational activities at school and at home.

2.1 Annual performance reports, 1999.

2.2 Annual performance reports, 1999.

2.3 Annual performance reports, 1999.

• OESE staff will share information on effective parent involvement models and approaches from Title I and other ED programs.

• Program staff will provide information to help facilitate networking among schools, Native Hawaiian education organizations, and resource centers to address the needs of Native students.

3. Native Hawaiian students will have access to a postsecondary education. 3.1 Undergraduate enrollment and completion. Increasing percentages of Native Hawaiian students attend and complete postsecondary institutions in comparison to historic trends for the Native Hawaiian population. 3.1 Annual performance reports, 1999. • OPE will provide information on counseling, support services, and other promising activities that meet the needs of at-risk students and encourage their inclusion in postsecondary programs.


Alaska Native Education Program -- $8,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To assist the Alaska Native population to achieve to challenging standards through supporting supplemental programs that meet their unique educational needs.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Alaska Native students will have access to instruction and curriculum that meets their unique educational needs. 1.1 Curriculum development. The curriculum developed by grantees will incorporate Alaska Native culture and language, and the contributions of Alaska Natives.

1.2 Student achievement. Increasing percentages of Alaska Native students will meet or exceed the performance standards that are established by the state or district, or on national assessments.

1.3 Professional development. The number of teachers of Alaska Native students that will be prepared to address Alaska Native's unique needs will increase each year.

1.1 Annual performance reports, 1999; final annual performance reports, 2000.

1.2 Annual performance reports, 1999; final annual performance reports, 2000.

1.3 Annual performance reports, 1999; final annual performance reports, 2000.

• Program staff will provide information to help facilitate networking among schools, Alaska Native education organizations, and resource centers to address the needs of Alaska Native students.
2. Parents of Alaska Native preschool students will become more effective educators through active involvement in their child's education. 2.1 Parent involvement. The number of parents reporting improved ability to teach their children will increase each year.

2.2 Support services. Increasing percentages of Alaska Native enrichment programs will provide support services to families that enable students to benefit from the program.

2.1 Annual performance reports, 1999; final annual performance reports, 2000.

2.2 Annual performance reports, 1999; final annual performance reports, 2000.

• OESE staff will share information obtained from other ED programs with similar objectives so that Alaska Native projects are aware of other models, approaches, and research.


Public Charter Schools Program -- $100,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To support the creation of charter schools and evaluate their effects.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Updates Strategies
1. Encourage the development of charter schools that are free from state or local rules that inhibit flexible operation, are held accountable for enabling students to reach challenging state performance standards, and are open to all students. 1.1 State legislation. By the year 2000, 40 states will have charter school legislation. As of August, 1997, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have charter school legislation.

1.2 Charter operations. By the year 2002, there will be 3,000 charter schools in operation around the nation. In January, 1996, 428 charter schools were in operation nationwide.

1.3 Flexibility and accountability. Studies will show that charter schools operate with greater flexibility than other public schools and with a focus on student performance.

1.4 Standards. Studies will show that charter schools are meeting or exceeding state performance standards.

1.5 Access. Studies will show that charter schools are open and accessible to all students. During the 1995-96 school year charter schools had, on average, a racial composition roughly similar to their state average, but a slightly lower proportion of students with limited English proficiency and students with disabilities.

1.6 Educational approaches. Studies will show that charter schools are implementing a variety of innovative educational approaches and documenting their results.

1.1 RPP study (1998, 1999, 2000), state legislatures, state educational agencies.

1.2 RPP study (1998, 1999, 2000), state legislatures, state educational agencies.

1.3 RPP study (1998, 1999, 2000), planned evaluation of the federal program (2000, 2001, 2002), UW-Rand study (1998).

1.4 Planned evaluation of the federal program (2000, 2001, 2002).

1.5 RPP study (2000), planned evaluation of the federal program (2000, 2001, 2002), other research studies (1998, 1999).

1.6 RPP study (2000), planned evaluation of the federal program (2000, 2001, 2002).

• Provide support and technical assistance for state and regional information/outreach meetings

• Develop and disseminate a variety of publications targeted nationally to parents, students, potential charter school developers, chartering agencies, legislators, policymakers, and others.

• Meet with universities, museums, organizations focused on educating disadvantaged children, and others with the capacity to help charter schools to encourage their support in sponsoring and providing technical assistance to charter schools and potential charter school developers.

• Support a charter school web site including a national registry of charter schools to share information on curriculum development, policy development, school finances, and legal issues.

• Share information about model charters and chartering processes for chartering agencies.

• Convene a national conference for federal charter school grantees, and others, with a focus on sharing lessons learned about equity, performance accountability, effective management, leadership and partnerships, and cross-fertilization to noncharter schools.

2. Evaluate the effects of charter schools, including identifying the most effective strategies to improve quality and innovation in the public school system. 2.1 Impact evaluation. By the year 2000, a national study of charter schools will be completed that examines the impact of charter schools on student achievement, as well as the impact on the school systems where the charter schools are located.

2.2 Program component analysis. By the year 2000, effects of charter schools in areas such as school governance, school finance, school and student assessment, standards and accountability, and educational equity will be analyzed.

2.3 Impact of federal program. By 1998, an evaluation of the impact of federal support for charter schools will be under way.

2.1 RPP study (2000), planned evaluation of the federal program (2000, 2001, 2002).

2.2 RPP study (2000), planned evaluation of the federal program (2000, 2001, 2002).

2.3 Planned evaluation of the federal program (2000, 2001, 2002).

• Support research studies to analyze the effects of charter schools in areas such as students with disabilities, assessment and accountability, fairness/equity, and school finance.

• Collect and disseminate information on charter school models that promote student achievement and innovation in the public school system and support the development of networks among charter schools that share this information.


Comprehensive Centers Program -- $40,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To assist Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) recipients in improving teaching and learning for all children, particularly children at risk of educational failure.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Provide with high-quality, cost-effective, comprehensive technical assistance to states, territories, tribes, school districts, and schools that helps students reach high academic standards. 1.1 Addressing legislative priorities. By 1999, 85% of comprehensive centers' (CCs) services will target schoolwide programs, or school districts and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) funded schools with the highest percentages and numbers of children in poverty.

1.2 Integrating technical assistance. The percentage of CC activities that provide integrated, noncategorical technical assistance (such as standards, assessment of special populations, reading, challenging curriculum, whole school reform) increases annually.

1.3 Addressing customer needs. The number and percentage of clients reporting satisfaction with the quality of technical assistance provided will increase annually. In 1996, the first year of funding for the program, when the CCs were not fully operational, 45% of State Title I Directors and Goals 2000 Coordinators indicated that the CCs were helpful or very helpful in understanding new flexibility and accountability provisions; 41% indicated that CCs were helpful or very helpful in understanding or implementing comprehensive standards-based reform.

1.4 Building capacity. State education agencies (SEAs) and local education agencies (LEAs) will expand their own capacity to provide high-quality technical assistance in support of ESEA programs, as a result of professional development activities provided by CCs.

1.5 Participating in ED Integrated Reviews Teams (IRTs). Technical assistance provided by CCs in conjunction with ED IRTs will be consistently perceived by SEAs and LEAs as highly useful in responding to issues identified by reviews.

1.1 Comprehensive center (CC) performance reports, quarterly and annual, 1998; report on program evaluation, 1999.

1.2 CC performance reports, quarterly and annual, 1998; report on program evaluation, 1999.

1.3 CC performance reports, quarterly and annual, 1998; report on program evaluation, 1999.

1.4 CC performance reports, quarterly and annual, 1998; report on program evaluation, 1999.

1.5 Report on program evaluation, 1999; project monitoring and IRT reports, periodic, 1998.

• Communicate with CCs on statutory and program priorities and engage CCs in developing strategies to further objectives in ED strategic plan.

• Identify and disseminate models of technical assistance that are noncategorical and support coordination of programs.

• Strengthen communication with customers (SEAs, LEAs, etc) to ensure that the types of services delivered by CCs meet customer needs.

• Through Integrated Reviews, meetings with SEA and LEA officials and other activities, identify capacity building needs and interests, and encourage SEAs and LEAs to use their CC to meet those needs.

• Encourage CCs to target areas of need for capacity building and plan training accordingly.

• Involve CCs in the planning and implementation of IRTs.

2. Develop and expand the capacity of the Comprehensive Centers to provide high-quality and cost-effective technical assistance that helps students reach high academic standards. 2.1 Maintaining staff expertise. Each CC will maintain appropriate staff with expertise needed to coordinate ESEA with one another, as well as with other federal, state and local programs and reforms.

2.2 Collaborating with other technical assistance providers. Coordination of services among the 15 CCs with other technical assistance providers and research institutions will leverage resources and result in increased referrals and joint activities.

2.1 CC performance reports, quarterly and annual, 1998; report on program evaluation, 1999.

2.2 CC performance reports, quarterly and annual, 1998; minutes or other records of joint meetings of CC directors and other TA providers, periodic, 1998; report on program evaluation, 1999.

• Create or expand regional and national networks of technical assistance providers through activities such as joint meetings of CCs and other service providers.

• Create opportunities for CCs with expertise in a particular area to train other CCs, in order to increase capacity and knowledge.

• Invite other technical assistance providers to meet quarterly with CC directors to expand knowledge of resources and mandates.

• Share information with ED offices administering technical assistance programs regarding services provided through referrals and joint activities.


Advanced Placement Test Fees -- $3,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal:To increase the numbers of low-income high school students are prepared to pursue higher education.
Objective Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. A greater number of low-income students participate in the Advanced Placement (AP) program. 1.1 Numbers served. The number of low-income students taking AP tests will increase annually. 1.1 Annual Performance Reports, 1999; Longitudinal Survey of Schools, 1999; Schools and Staffing Surveys, 2001. • Pursue strategies to encourage more low-income, minority, and students with special needs to (1) complete the challenging academic courses that are prerequisite to AP courses and (2) take AP courses.

• Disseminate information to the public about the availability of dollars to pay for or help pay for AP test fees.


Education Opportunity Zones -- $200,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To assist urban and rural local educational agencies with high concentrations of children from low-income families to implement systemic reform strategies to enable all students in the district to meet challenging academic standards.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. EOZs will target low-performing schools (schools identified as being in need of improvement or slated for intervention). 1.1 Targeted for services. Schools identified for school improvement or slated for intervention will be targeted for services. 1.1 Annual performance reports; national evaluation study. • Promote district efforts to improve schools by disseminating information and guidance on best practices and strategies for turning around low performing schools, implementing schoolwide programs, and best practices for teaching children who are risk of failure.

• Provide assistance on leveraging all federal program funds to improve low performing schools.

2. EOZs will recruit, retain, and support qualified teaching staffs. 2.1 Professional development. The percentage of EOZ districts with comprehensive professional development plans for teachers and instructional leaders will increase.

2.2 Licensure and certification. The percentage of teachers in EOZ schools who satisfy all state licensure requirements or have at least a minor in the subjects they teach and the number who obtain NBPTS certification will increase.

2.3 Teacher performance. The percentage of EOZ grantees that have developed systems for rewarding high-performing teachers or systems for fairly and quickly removing low-performing teachers will increase.

2.1 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

2.2 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study; Schools and Staffing Survey.

2.3 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

• Produce and disseminate a publication on teacher accountability systems.
3. Student achievement in schools served by EOZ grants will show improvements in the core academic subjects. 3.1 EOZ schools. Increasing percentages of students in EOZ schools will meet or exceed basic, proficient and advanced levels in state and local assessments.

3.2 Low-performing schools. Low-performing schools will show progress at least comparable to districtwide averages in their percent of students meeting or exceeding basic, proficient, and advanced levels in state and local assessments.

3.3 Limited English proficient students. Disabled and limited English proficient students will show progress in meeting or exceeding basic, proficient, and advanced levels in State and local assessments comparable to districtwide averages.

3.4 High school graduation. The percentage of students attending high schools located in EOZs who graduate will increase.

3.5 Postsecondary education. The percentage of students from high schools located in EOZs who pursue postsecondary education will increase.

3.1 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

3.2 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

3.3 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

3.4 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

3.5 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

• Develop an application that requires grantees to demonstrate how they will use program funds and other resources to carry out standards-based, districtwide policies.

• Sponsor activities such as conferences, workshops, or communications using the Internet where participating districts can exchange information and ideas to enhance the success of program.

4. District and school accountability systems will be focused on student learning results and will include incentives and consequences, and reporting of results to parents and the community. 4.1 Incentives to schools. The percentage of districts receiving EOZ grants that provide incentives to schools for improved student performance will increase.

4.2 Low-performing school interventions. The percentage of districts receiving EOZ grants that have developed systems to identify and intervene in low-performing schools will increase.

4.3 Academic standards. The percentage of EOZs that require students to meet academic standards at key transition points will increase.

4.4 Measures of school quality. The number of districts receiving EOZ grants that provide parents with annual reports on measures of school quality will increase.

4.1 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

4.2 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

4.3 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

4.4 Annual performance reports; grantee evaluations; national evaluation study.

• Assist districts in developing and implementing aligned assessments.

• Provide technical assistance on developing an accountability system that is comprehensive and fair.

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