A r c h i v e d  I n f o r m a t i o n

U.S. Department of Education FY 1999 Annual Plan - February 27, 1998

Vocational and Adult Education


Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act (State Grants and Tech-Prep Indicators) -- $1,136,650,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To increase access to and improve educational programs that strengthen education achievement, workforce preparation, and lifelong learning.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
Student achievement
1. Vocational students achieve high level of proficiency in math, science and communication skills. 1.1 Academic proficiency of vocational students. By fall 2000, vocational students will show increasing proficiency on standardized assessment instruments.

1.2 Academic proficiency of targeted populations. By fall 2000, targeted populations will show increasing proficiency on standardized assessment instruments.

1.1-1.2 National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS) Base Year "Second Follow-up and High School Transcript Files," 1992 for Math and Science. Follow-up: 2000. • Work with states to establish challenging goals, benchmarks, and uniform accountability measures for use by all states.

• Improve the connection between academic and industry-based skills by working with School-to-Work (STW), the National Skills Board, and VocEd State Offices.

2. Vocational students achieve a high level of proficiency in industry-recognized skill certificate programs in secondary and postsecondary institutions. 2.1 Earning industry-recognized skill certificates. By fall 2000, there will be an increasing proportion of vocational students successfully completing programs with industry approved/recognized skill standards and certificates in major career/occupational areas in secondary and postsecondary institutions. 2.1 Study to be conducted using 1998 National Programs funding. • Work with the National Skill Standards Board to support three consortia of states to implement challenging industry-recognized skills in health, business, and manufacturing.

• Through Tech-Prep, STW, and State Offices, continue work to encourage and support the interconnection between challenging academic and industry-based skills.

3. Vocational students make successful transitions to continuing education, work, or other career options. 3.1 Secondary education attainment. The proportion of vocational students attaining a degree or GED diploma, entering postsecondary programs, and attaining employment in their area of concentration will increase.

3.2 Postsecondary education attainment. The proportion of vocational students attaining an associate or bachelor degree or certificate, and attaining employment in their area of concentration will increase.

3.1-3.2 School-to-Work (STW) National Evaluation Surveys & follow-ups, 1996, 1998, & 2000 for secondary. Beginning Postsecondary Students, 1996 for postsecondary. • Encourage Congress to incorporate this objective into the performance measurement systems of the states through new legislation.
4. Employers are satisfied with the competencies of vocational concentrators they hire. 4.1 Employer satisfaction. By fall 1999, at least 50% (currently 41%) of the employers will indicate the highest satisfaction categories for students in and graduates of secondary Vocational Education programs; this will be at least 60% (currently 54%) for postsecondary students & graduates. 4.1 National Assessment of Vocational Education (NAVE), Vol. II; NAVE follow-up; National Employer Surveys, 1994, 1996, 1999. • Promote employer involvement in secondary and postsecondary vocational education reforms.

• Increase business-community college partnerships.

• Create faculty internships with business.

Student participation
5. All students, including targeted populations, have access to high-quality vocational-technical education programs. 5.1 Access of special populations. By fall 2000, targeted populations will increasingly participate in secondary and postsecondary programs that implement industry skill/recognized skill standards and award certificates.

5.2 Outcomes of special populations. By fall 2000, the rate will increase among targeted populations of successful transition from secondary to postsecondary education programs or work, and from postsecondary programs to work.

5.1-5.2 Study to be conducted using 1998 National Programs funding. • Identify and disseminate models that effectively serve targeted populations in Vocational Education programs.

• Collaborate with the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and the Planning and Evaluation Service (PES) to improve and expand data collections on targeted student populations.

Performance standards and measures
6. Improve the quality and use of State accountability systems. Performance measurement. An increasing number of states will:

6.1 Use Standards and Measures for local program improvement.

6.2 Use common School-to-Work and Vocational Education Standards and Measures.

6.3 Adopt core Standards and Measures with common definitions.

6.1-6.3 MPR Associates', Common Core Measures Contract, 1998.

6.3 Same as 6.1.

• Work with states and other stakeholders to create accountability systems as required by new legislation.

• Provide states technical assistance to (1) develop and use performance standards to improve program quality, (2) identify and share models of performance and accountability, and (3) create outcome measures common to STW and vocational education. Collaborate with ED offices and other Federal agencies engaged in providing technical assistance on accountability initiatives.

School reform
7. Coordinate Vocational Education with Goals 2000, ESEA, Adult Education, IDEA, STW and state school reform strategies. 7.1 Consolidated state plans. By fall 1998, Perkins will be part of ESEA consolidated plans in at least 12 states.

7.2 State and local reforms. By fall 1999, the New American High School and Urban High School initiatives, increasingly will be a core reform element in many state reform initiatives.

7.1-7.3 OVAE Fall 1997, STW Progress Measures, 1996; National Evaluation, 1997; National Employer Survey II, 1998. NCES Fast Response Survey of State reform initiatives, 1998. • Disseminate successful reform strategies to secondary and postsecondary urban institutions.

• Expand the New American High School initiative.

• Implement a system to work with State directors of community colleges to encourage colleges to become active partners in secondary school reform.

8. States align vocational teacher certification and assessment with National Board for Professional Teacher Standards and provide leadership for professional development. 8.1 National standards. An increasing number of States utilize the National Board for Professional Teacher Standards for vocational teacher certification and assessment.

8.2 Increased access to professional development. An increasing percentage of vocational teachers will receive high-quality professional development.

8.1 National Board for Professional Teacher Standards Annual Report.

8.2 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), 1987-88, 1993-94, 1999. Additional analysis needed.

• OVAE is addressing professional development through a $4 million grant competition supporting projects that develop, implement, and operate programs using different curricula models that integrate vocational and academic learning.

• Identify model teacher preparation programs that include integrated curriculum strategies, contextualized instructional approaches, skill and academic standards. and disseminate information to colleges of education.


National Programs Indicators (Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act)-- $13,497,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To increase access and improve vocational education that will strengthen work force preparation, employment opportunities, and lifelong learning.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
Performance standards and measures
1. Improve and expand national knowledge base of strategies that support state and local reform in vocational education. 1.1 Improve knowledge base. Products and services of the National Center for Research in Vocational Education (NCRVE) will focus on the identification, development, and assessment of integrated instruction strategies, secondary and postsecondary linkages, professional development, and state performance goals and indicators. 1.1 Short-term studies, annual reports and on-going research from the National Center for Research in Vocational Education (NCRVE), and other research contracts. • Coordinate vocational education research agendas with PES, OERI, and DOL.

• Identify promising practices to train and retrain teachers in integrated and contextualized instructional approaches.

• Identify integrated curricula that strengthen student competency in math, science, technology, and communication.

2. Increase the use of research and development findings to improve state and local practice. 2.1 Customer satisfaction. External peer reviews/customer satisfaction surveys of NCRVE research and technical assistance activities, to be conducted by ED, will show increasing satisfaction with the quality of research and program improvement activities. 2.1 Annual independent stakeholder surveys, 1998, 1999, 2000. • Develop and implement a Customer Peer Review process for NCRVE research and technical assistance activities.
3. Support state efforts to refine and expand performance measurement and accountability practices in vocational education for program improvement. 3.1 Core standards and measures. The number of States adopting core Standards and Outcome Measures with common definitions will increase. 3.1 Progress and Performance Measures Contract outcomes. • Assist States in designing strategies to develop a unified system of core measurement indicators, including outcome measures; designing a reporting format for collecting outcome data; and field testing the reporting process and use of data for program improvement.


Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions -- $0 (FY 99)
Goal: To increase access to and improve vocational education that will strengthen workforce preparation, employment opportunities, and lifelong learning in the Indian Community.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
Student achievement and participation
1. Vocational students served in Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions make successful transitions to work or continuing education. 1.1 Improved employment of graduates. By the year 2000 the number of vocational students attaining employment in the field in which they were trained or pursuing higher level training at the certificate or BA level will increase. 1.1 Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Annual Performance Report, 1999. • Work with the Office of the White House Initiative for Tribal Colleges and Universities to develop additional strategies.

• Work with grantees to improve the collection of placement data.

• Encourage grantees to include apprenticeship and work-based learning opportunities in their institutions.

• Work with grantees to encourage coordination of associate degree programs with four-year institutions through articulation agreements.

2. Vocational students served in Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions have access to high quality vocational-technical education programs. 2.1 Increased student participation. By the year 2000 the number of vocational students seeking certificates or AA degrees in vocational training areas will increase.

2.2 Improved participation in apprenticeships. By the year 2000 the number of vocational students participating in apprenticeship and work-based learning programs will increase.

2.3 Increased participation in articulated programs. By the year 2000 the number of vocational students participating in associate degree training programs that are articulated with an advanced degree option will increase.

2.1 Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Annual Performance Report, 1999.

2.2 Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Annual Performance Report, 1999.

2.3 Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Annual Performance Report, 1999.


Adult Education -- $361,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To support adult education systems that result in increased adult learner achievement in order to prepare adults for family, work, citizenship, and future learning.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
Adult learners
1. Improve literacy in the United States. 1.1 Improve literacy. By fall 2002 the number of adults performing in the lowest proficiency level in the National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS) will decrease. Between 40 and 44 million adults performed in the lowest of five proficiency levels in the 1992 NALS. 1.1 NALS I and NALS II, 2002. • In partnership with the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), National Programs funds will help support the development and execution of a second National Adult Literacy Survey.
2. Provide adult learners with opportunities to acquire basic foundation skills (including English language acquisition) and complete secondary education. 2.1 Basic skill acquisition. By fall 2000, 40% of adults in beginning-level Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs will complete that level and achieve basic skill proficiency. Current baseline: 630,000 beginning level students 28% completion rate.

2.2 Basic English language acquisition. By fall 2000, 40% of adults in beginning English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) programs will complete and achieve basic English literacy. Current baseline: 435,000 beginning ESOL students 27% completion rate.

2.3 Secondary completion. By fall 2000, 40% of adults enrolled in secondary level programs will earn a diploma or GED. Current baseline: 925,000 secondary level students 38% completion rate.

2.4 Transition to work. By fall 2000, 300,000 adults participating in adult education will get a job or retain or advance in their current job. Current baseline: 268,000.

2.1 Adult Education Management Information System/ annual, 1997.

2.2 Adult Education Management Information System/annual, 1997.

2.3 Adult Education Management Information System/annual, 1997.

2.4 Adult Education Management Information System/annual, 1997.

• Leverage National Programs funds with State "353" funds to develop a model basic skills certification program and disseminate results nationally.

• Working with OSERS, the National Adult Literacy and Learning Disabilities Center, and the National Institutes of Health, DAEL will develop information concerning learning accommodation strategies to facilitate the assessment, placement, participation, retention, and completion of adults with disabilities in literacy programs.

• Based on the evaluation of the National Workplace Literacy Program, technical assistance will be provided to help states and local programs integrate work readiness activities within the basic skills delivery system.

3. Provide adult learners at the lowest levels of literacy access to educational opportunities to improve their basic foundation skills. 3.1 Educationally disadvantaged. By fall 1999, adults at the lowest levels of literacy (those in Beginning ABE and Beginning ESOL) will comprise 45-50% of the total national enrollment. Current baseline: 42%.

3.2 Distance learning. By fall 2000, 15 states will offer ESOL instruction through the Crossroads Café distance learning program. Current baseline: 5 states.

3.3 Welfare-to-Work clients. By fall 2000, 150,000 welfare to work clients will be enrolled in work-related basic skills training.

3.1 Adult Education Management Information System/ annual, 1997.

3.2 Adult Education Management Information System/annual, 1999. New data elements required.

3.3 Adult Education Management Information System/annual, 1999. New data elements required.

To broaden access to literacy services, National Programs funds will leverage investment from at least 10 states (with high percentages of low level adult learners) to develop a second phase of Crossroads Cafe in a family literacy context.

• DAEL will develop a "Tool Box" of technical assistance services, including evaluation results of Crossroads Café programs and three implementation models, to promote the use of Crossroads Cafe.

State and local programs
4. Implement state and local performance management systems for accountability and program improvement. 4.1 Building performance management capacity. By fall 2000, all states will implement a national results-based performance management system to report on program effectiveness and learner achievement. 4.1 Adult Education Management Information System, annual, 2001. Will require modification and expansion to accommodate new result measures and benchmarks. • Create a national performance-based management system for the adult education delivery system. Phase I, outcome measures and methodology; Phase II, pilot test; and Phase III, implementation and training at the state and local level.
Professional development and teacher training
5. States will implement statewide professional development systems and professional standards for instructors. 5.1 High teaching standards. By fall 2000, at least 25% of states will adopt professional standards for adult education teachers. Current baseline: 10 states. 5.1 Adult Education Management Information System, 1998. Minor revisions to system needed. • National Programs funds will support collaborative projects with states to develop model professional teaching standards.
Systems building
6. Improve access to quality programs for adult learners by integrating services and leveraging resources. 6.1 Family literacy. By fall 2000, adult education programs in 20 states will be formal partners with Even Start and Head Start agencies in the delivery of family literacy programs.

6.2 Employment and training. By fall 2000, adult education programs in at least 10 states will be formal partners with one-stop career systems.

6.1 Adult Education Management Information System, 1998. Requires system revision.

6.2 Adult Education Management Information System, 1998.

• Continue collaborative partnership with the National Center for Family Literacy and Even Start to develop state-level alliances that further coordinated family literacy services.

• With input from field experts, design and provide technical assistance in the creation and use of contextualized learning practices in workplace learning, family literacy and services for out-of-school youth.


Adult Education: Evaluation and Technical Assistance -- $27,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve practice in adult education.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
Model English as a Second Language (ESL) programs
1. Improve the effectiveness of ESL programs by carefully testing promising instructional, curriculum, staff and development approaches. 1.1 Replication of promising models. Models will be effectively implemented at demonstrations sites and, ultimately, successfully adopted by ESL programs, in general.

1.2 Student achievement. Students in demonstration projects will show improved achievement in reading, writing, and speaking English.

1.1 Interim report of independent evaluation of model ESL programs, 2002; final report, 2005.

1.2 Interim report of independent evaluation of model ESL programs, 2002; final report, 2005.

• Coordinate with President's Hispanic Initiative to support $20 million demonstration for model ESL programs.

• Provide technical assistance to help ESL programs implement reform models.

• Initiate independent evaluation to track implementation of models and student impacts.

Improved practice
2. Improve and expand knowledge base of strategies that support reform in adult education. 2.1 Customer satisfaction. External peer reviews/customer satisfaction surveys show increasing satisfaction with the quality of research, development, and program improvement activities. 2.1 Stakeholder surveys, 1999. • Disseminate findings from national studies in a timely fashion and in formats that are useful to the field.


National Institute for Literacy --$6,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To lead the national effort to assure opportunities for all adults with literacy needs to receive effective and responsive services resulting in success in the family, at work, and in the community.

Objectives

Indicators

Sources and Next Update

Strategies

Increasing national awareness and understanding that improving the literacy skills of America's adults and families will strengthen families, communities, and the economy
1. Public Awareness Campaign. Raise the awareness level of the general public, policymakers, and the private sector as to the nature and extent of literacy problems in the United States and their impact on our economy, families, and communities. 1.1 Airing of public service messages. Future public service messages will air in media markets nationwide. Baseline is under development.

1.2 Referrals to literacy programs. During campaign months, there will be a 30% increase in the number of potential students, tutors, and contributors referred to local literacy programs. The Literacy Hotline made over 1,000 referrals a month.

1.1 Contractor's monitoring of TV and radio placements, ongoing, 1998.

1.2 Reports from hotline/ clearinghouse, quarterly, 1998.

• The contractor and other campaign partners will work to leverage large amounts of free air time on TV and radio to reach a large national audience.

• Create an on-line listserv for communication with states about campaign success and strategies.

2. Literacy Leader Fellowships. Provide a unique opportunity for individuals in the field to conduct year-long projects to benefit the literacy field. Fellowships offer a way for timely, innovative ideas to have an immediate impact on the literacy community. 2.1 Dissemination of fellows' reports. Increasing numbers of requests will be received for the fellows' project reports. In a typical month, the hotline receives 110 requests for fellows' reports. 2.1 National Institute for Literacy (NIFL) internal mailing records, reports of distribution from hotline/ clearinghouse, Internet, ongoing, 1998. • NIFL staff and current and former fellows will actively disseminate information about fellowships by making presentations at meetings and conferences nationwide.

• Publish fellows' reports and publicize the fellowship program and reports on Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS).

Increasing national awareness and understanding that improving the literacy skills of America's adults and families will strengthen families, communities, and the economy
3. Promote the development of sound public policy that expands access to high-quality literacy services to all who need it, by serving as a resource for policymakers, and assisting the literacy field in staying informed about, developing consensus around, and speaking with one voice on literacy-related policy issues. 3.1 Congressional staff attendance at Policy Forums. NIFL will host at least three bipartisan briefings on the Hill.

3.2 Public reception of Policy Updates. NIFL will produce 12 or more Policy Updates annually that reach the target audience while the issue discussed is still timely. In 1997, 13 Policy Updates were produced.

3.1 NIFL's project management system, ongoing, 1998.

3.2 NIFL's project management system, ongoing; customer satisfaction contract, 1999.

• NIFL director, deputy director, and project officer will maintain close contact with Congressional staff through meetings, correspondence, and Internet exchange.

• NIFL project officer will make presentations on policy issues at meetings and conferences nationwide.

Creating a cutting edge information and communication infrastructure for the literacy field that supports improved teaching and learning
4. Provide the adult literacy community with a state-of-the-art information and communication system on the Internet through LINCS. 4.1 Communication services. By fall 1999, there will be a 50% increase in the number of subscribers to LINCS on-line discussion groups on a variety of adult literacy-related subjects. Current baseline is 3,500.

4.2 Expansion of LINCS. By fall 1999, the number of local programs participating in LINCS will have doubled. Current baseline is 200.

4.1 LINCS internal monitoring system; listserv moderator organization databases, ongoing, 1999.

4.2 LINCS internal monitoring system; Regional Hub statistics; Hub, state, and local home pages, ongoing, 1999.

• Develop and maintain listservs on a variety of literacy topics in partnership with major adult literacy organizations at national, state and local level.

• Improve the quantity and quality of resources in partnership with the LINCS regional hubs, state member organizations, and national organizations.

5. Provide a national hotline to inform potential students and tutors of programs in their areas. Use this resource to disseminate NIFL and other materials that target the hotline's frequently asked questions. 5.1 Satisfaction with referrals and materials. There will be an 80% customer satisfaction rating among hotline users in terms of referrals and materials provided. 5.1 Customer satisfaction contract, 1999. • Use the hotline to provide materials for public awareness campaign, and disseminate NIFL products widely and efficiently.
Building the capacity of organizations and programs to provide high quality services that meet the needs of all adult learners
6. Equipped for the Future (EFF). Develop content standards, performance standards, and assessments tied to the standards that will create a consensus about the purpose of the literacy system and increase its effectiveness. 6.1 Participation of EFF Partners. At least 20 states and local literacy programs will have joined with NIFL as Partners and will attend an annual meeting, as well as participate in regular communications via LINCS by January 1999. Currently, no such partners exist.

6.2 Assessment identification and development. All existing assessments relevant to EFF standards will be reviewed as to their fit with the standards. If needed, at least one assessment will be under development by March 1999. Currently no assessments have been reviewed.

6.1 NIFL internal management system; final reports of grantees, ongoing and annual, 1999.

6.2 Report of EFF Technical Committee, 1999.

• NIFL will convene annual meetings of EFF network beginning July 1998 to provide opportunities for information and resource sharing, training, and technical assistance.

• NIFL will work with the EFF Technical Committee in 1998 to discuss implications of EFF standards for curriculum and assessment materials.

Building the capacity of organizations and programs to provide high quality services that meet the needs of all adult learners
7. National Adult Literacy and Learning Disability Center. Maintain a national center for the collection and dissemination of the most current and reliable information, materials, and instructional methods related to learning disabilities (LD) as they affect adult literacy. 7.1 Training services. Selected literacy and other human resource systems in 20 states will participate in training to adapt service delivery systems to better meet the needs of adults with LD by fall 1998. Currently no states have participated in these activities.

7.2 Satisfaction with center services. 70% of users of the National Adult Literacy and Learning Disability Center services will express satisfaction with the utility and quality of services. Baseline is under development.

7.1 NIFL internal management system; Center and Learning Disabilities Training and Dissemination (LDTD) Hub reports; Center external evaluation, ongoing, 1998.

7.2 NIFL internal management system; Center listserv moderator reports , ongoing, 1998.

• The Center, with the LDTD Hub, will implement a plan to help states achieve systemic change in the provision of services to adults with LD.

• The Center will collect and disseminate the most current and reliable information about LD, in terms of both research and practice.

8. Learning Disabilities Training and Dissemination (LDTD) Hubs. Establish a network of projects for providing training and technical assistance to literacy and other human resource development programs about how to achieve systemic change to better serve adults with LD. 8.1 Training services. Selected literacy and other systems in all Hubs' targeted states will have participated in activities related to the Center's Tool Kit and adapting service delivery systems to better meet the needs of adults with LD by fall '98. Currently no states have participated in these activities.

8.2 Satisfaction with Hub services. 70% of hub users will be satisfied with quality of services. Baseline under development.

8.1 NIFL internal management system; Center and Hub reports, ongoing, 1998.

8.2 NIFL internal management system; Center and Hub reports, ongoing, 1998.

• LDTD Hubs will collaborate with the Center to implement a comprehensive plan for helping states achieve systemic change in the provision of services to adults with LD.


Literacy Programs for Prisoners and Grants to States for Workplace and Community Transition for Incarcerated Youth Offenders -- $0 (FY 99)
Goal: To increase access to and achievement in correctional education programs that will aid in the reintegration of prisoners into their communities.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
Student achievement
1. Grantees will develop and implement improved educational programs that include literacy, life skills, and vocational training, including school-to-work type activities. 1.1 Improved completion rates. By the year 2000 the number of students completing educational programs within adult prisons and pre-release facilities will increase.

1.2 Improved participation in post-release assistance programs. By the year 2000 the number of participants taking part in post-release assistance will increase.

1.1 Annual reports and site visits, 1998-1999.

1.2 Annual reports and site visits, 1998-1999.

• The Office of Correctional Education (OCE) will continue to coordinate Department-wide correctional education activities through its coordinating committee on correctional education.

• Facilitate the exchange of information between grantees by establishing a network for the communication of effective strategies and best practices.

• Through technical assistance activities, work with grantees to improve data collection and begin to compile base line information on participants and completions rates.

Access to services
2. Improve access to postsecondary education for incarcerated persons. 2.1 Improved inmate participation in GED programs. By the year 2000, the number of inmates completing their GED thus making them eligible to participate in postsecondary programs will increase.

2.2 Improved access to information on postsecondary programs including distance learning. External peer reviews/customer satisfaction surveys of OCE technical support and mail response will show increasing satisfaction with quality of information provided.

2.1 Annual reports and site visits, 1998- 1999.

2.2 Grantee feedback from technical support meetings, telephone and mail correspondence and site visits, ongoing.

• Encourage grantees to provide participants with information on postsecondary education and work programs specific to their regions.

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