A r c h i v e d  I n f o r m a t i o n

U.S. Department of Education FY 1999 Annual Plan - February 27, 1998

Educational Research and Improvement


National Education Research Institutes -- $53,782,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To contribute to the improvement of education by expanding the knowledge base about teaching and learning.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
Knowledge production
1. Support research and development that yield findings that can be used to improve education. 1.1 Addressing critical problems. Research and development and field-initiated studies address critical problems in education.

1.2 Meeting high professional standards for research. Funded activities are rigorously designed and meet the highest professional standards for research and development activity.

1.1 Board review of research priorities for centers in 1996 and peer reviewer evaluations of field-initiated studies proposals, 1999.

1.2 Interim and final peer reviews of centers and field-initiated studies, 1998; acceptance of articles in refereed scientific journals, 1998.

• With the Board, engage the education community in an extensive process to identify specific research priorities.

• Use peer reviews to provide centers and field-initiated studies with input for midcourse corrections.

Impact
2. Findings from research and development activities influence change in education policy and practice. 2.1 Influencing budget and legislation. Research findings provide valuable input for the development of budget and legislative proposals.

2.2 Influencing policy and practice. Research findings provide valuable input for the development of State and local education policies and practices.

2.1 Review of budget and legislative proposals for ESEA and HEA, 1998.

2.2 Periodic survey of labs and centers, 1999; periodic independent study to assess impact of research on policy and practice, 2001.

• Develop effective strategies for disseminating research products to target audiences.


Interagency Research Initiative -- $50,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve teaching and achievement in reading and mathematics by generating new knowledge and testing new strategies.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Support rigorous investigations that yield new theories and practical applications for supporting students' cognitive development and their acquisition of reading and math skills. 1.1 Partnership. The Office of Educational Research and improvement will form a partnership with the National Science Foundation and other relevant agencies to develop and implement a detailed plan for this initiative.

1.2 Addressing critical problems. Projects will address critical problems related to children's cognitive development, the effective use of educational technology, and children's acquisition of reading and math skills.

1.3 Meeting highest professional standards. Funded activities are rigorously designed and will meet the highest professional standards for research and development activity.

1.1 Review of plan, 1998.

1.2 Board evaluation of research agenda, 1999.

1.3 Periodic peer review of research activities, 2001.

• Meet with staff from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) to establish a working group and planning process.

• Develop agenda in partnership with the NSF, NICHD researchers, and education community.

• Establish peer review process in partnership with NSF.


Regional Educational Laboratories -- $56,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To promote knowledge-based educational improvement to help all students meet high standards through development, applied research, dissemination, and technical assistance conducted with local, state and intermediate agencies.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
Field-based development and applied research
1. Develop policies, strategies, and/or models of comprehensive, effective reform that are used to assist states and local school districts as they implement programs in which all students achieve at high levels and/or in which emerging theories of teaching and learning are continually assessed and validated. 1.1 Number of development sites. An increasing number of local and/or state sites will be engaged in collaborative development and demonstration of comprehensive reform.

1.2 Scope of innovation undertaken at development sites. Participants and external reviewers will rate the scope of innovation as "comprehensive."

1.3 Capacity building. After two years of onsite development, participants and external observers will report increased capacity at sites to apply research and improve practice.

1.4 Student achievement. After a sustained period of onsite development, local sites will show increases in student achievement.

1.5 Potential for scaling up. After a sustained period of onsite development, participants and external observers will report that the effort as implemented has high potential for success in new sites.

1.1 Quarterly laboratory reports, 1998.

1.2 Annual laboratory client surveys, 1998; ED external evaluations, 1998.

1.3 Laboratory client surveys and external reviews, 1999.

1.4 State or local assessments, 1999; annual laboratory client surveys, 1999.

1.5 Annual client surveys and external reviews, 1999.

• Collaborate with state and local agencies in reform efforts that (1) implement effective, research-based strategies and (2) build comprehensive reform

• Develop tested policies, strategies, and/or models for more wide-scale educational improvement

Dissemination and service
2. Identify or produce materials and strategies for implementing reform in policy and practice and improvement throughout districts and states. 2.1 Availability of resources. A large number of appropriate products will be available that respond to customer needs, and more modes of access will be offered for selected products, over time.

2.2 Customer receipt of products. Increasing circulation of products and increasing hits on electronic sites, rising annually from baseline levels.

2.3 Quality of products. More than 80% of experts in the field will find laboratory products and materials to be of high quality.

2.4 Contributions of events, products, and sustained services. More than 80% of customers will report contributions to their knowledge, skills, and professional work.

2.5 Student achievement. In sites receiving intensive, sustained implementation assistance, student achievement will increase.

2.1 Quarterly and annual laboratory reports, 1998.

2.2 Laboratory records and quarterly reports, 1998.

2.3 Annual laboratory client surveys, 1998; ED external evaluation, 1998.

2.4 Annual laboratory client surveys, 1998.

2.5 State or local assessments, 1999; annual client surveys, 1999.

• Develop and widely disseminate research-based products, programs, and services.

• Provide a range of technical assistance services from one-time events through more sustained services and relationships, and including both "convening" and the provision of information and assistance; provide more intensive services where opportunities to contribute to educational improvement are greatest.

Strategic alliances and learning communities
3. Facilitate, create, and expand networks, alliances, and communities of learners that address significant issues (e.g., standards, assessment, use of technology, etc.) in support of state and local reform. 3.1 Significant roles of laboratories in strategic alliances. The total number of alliances in which laboratories have significant and sustained roles will increase over time along with membership in those alliances.

3.2 Significance and impact of alliances. More that 80% of participants involved in alliances will perceive that alliances address significant educational concerns and expand capacity of participants.

3.3 Cooperative activity with other federally funded entities. The number of joint events and ventures with other federally funded research institutions and providers of information and technical assistance will increase annually.

3.4 Value of joint events and ventures with other federally funded entities. More than 80% of participants in cooperative activities will perceive that the activities are of high quality, address significant educational concerns, and expand capacity of participants.

3.1 Laboratory records and quarterly reports, 1998.

3.2 Annual laboratory client surveys, 1998.

3.3 Laboratory records and quarterly reports, 1998.

3.4 Annual laboratory client surveys; 1998.

• Create and expand within-region and nationwide alliances and networks with practitioners, service providers, policy makers, and federally funded research institutions and providers of information and technical assistance.

• Leverage resources and scale up education reform strategies through strategic alliances.


Dissemination -- $18,785,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To help the education community access and use the best research-based products and services available to improve American education.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Coordinate dissemination activities across the Office of Education Research and Improvement (OERI) and with other offices in the Department. 1.1 Eliminate duplication. There will be no duplication in the products disseminated by the Department.

1.2 Departmental dissemination coordination. Dissemination activities of Department offices will be effectively linked.

1.1 Annual media products survey, 1998.

1.2 Survey of users, 1998.

• Prepare annual OERI media products plan, and solicit product plans from other offices.
2. Target dissemination activities on the Department's seven priorities. 2.1 Products address the Department's seven priorities. 75% of OERI products will address one of the seven priorities. 2.1 OERI media products plan, 1998. • Identify products to address the seven priorities.
3. Serve as a one-stop referral point for education information. 3.1 Customer usage. Users of National Library and ERIC increase annually and are satisfied with services. 3.1 Counts of the users and annual customer surveys, 1998. • Actively reach out to the education community through the Internet, targeted publication, NLE and Department 800 numbers, and information clearinghouses.
4. Identify exemplary and promising education programs. 4.1 Identify exemplary and promising practices. Exemplary and promising practices will be identified in math, science, reading, technology, and drug prevention. 4.1 Expert panels, 1998 (math). • First panel established in 1997. Establish additional panels in 1998.


Statistics and Assessment -- $108,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To collect, analyze, and disseminate information on the condition of education in the U.S. and to provide comparative international statistics.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
Data collection
1. Provide timely, useful, and comprehensive data that are relevant to policy and educational improvement. 1.1 Customer satisfaction. An increasing percentage of each major type of customer will agree that National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) data are timely, relevant, and comprehensive. 1.1 Planned targeted customer surveys in FY 1997 to develop baseline data, winter 1998; NCES focus group discussions with targeted customers, including policymakers, researchers, and practitioners, 1997; biannual input from NCES' advisory council, 1997; NCES Customer Survey, 1996. • The NCES will continue to conduct focus groups discussions with key customers and targeted surveys to assess and improve the timeliness, relevance, and comprehensiveness of its data.

• Working group to provide recommendations on the redesign of the Schools and Staffing Survey , conduct a constituency survey on NAEP.

2. Collect high-quality data. 2.1 Customer ratings of quality. An increasing percentage of customers will agree that NCES data are of high quality in terms of accuracy, reliability, validity, and completeness. 2.1 Planned targeted customer surveys in FY 1997 to develop baseline data, winter 1998; NCES focus group discussions with targeted customers including policymakers, researchers, and practitioners, 1997; biannual input from NCES's advisory council; NCES Customer Survey, 1996. • NCES uses a variety of quality control mechanisms to ensure data quality. These include a rigorous adjudication process, written statistical standards and advice from technical advisory groups.

• NCES will implement recommendations recently developed by a quality task force comprised of NCES and contractor staff.

Data analysis, synthesis, and packaging
3. Develop publications that are easy to read, useful, and of high overall quality. 3.1 Ease of reading. An increasing percentage of customers will rate NCES publications as easy to read.

3.2 Utility. An increasing percentage of customers will rate NCES publications as useful to their work.

3.3 Publication quality. An increasing percentage of customers will express satisfaction with the overall quality of NCES publications.

3.1 Planned targeted customer surveys in FY 1997 to develop baseline data, winter 1998; NCES Customer Survey, 1996 (see prior footnote).

3.2 Same sources.

3.3 Same sources.

• NCES will expand its use of technical writers/editors to develop more user friendly publications.

• NCES's new Communications Officer will have explicit responsibility for ensuring that recommendations from key customers are incorporated into NCES's publications.


Eisenhower Federal Activities -- $50,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve the teaching and learning of all students through the development and demonstration of high-quality professional development activities, the provision of high-quality instructional materials and information about effective programs, and the expansion of a cadre of highly accomplished teachers.

Objective

Indicators

Data Source/Next Update

Strategies

Development and demonstration projects
1. Improve classroom instruction through effective professional development. 1.1 Teachers' skills and classroom instruction. A majority of teachers who receive services from Eisenhower-supported projects over a sustained period of time will report that their knowledge, skills, and classroom instruction improve.(National evaluations of Development & Demonstration Projects and the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse are scheduled to occur between 1999-2001.)

1.2 Student performance. Students whose teachers receive services from an Eisenhower-supported project will show improvements in attendance and/or performance by the final year of federal support for the project.

1.3 Impact on Capacity. Projects will demonstrate that they have contributed to the capacity of participating schools and/or school districts to provide high-quality professional development to teachers and other educators.

1.1 Project reports, 2001; national evaluation, 2001.

1.2 Project reports, 2001; national evaluation, 2001 .

1.3 Project reports, 2001; national evaluation 2001.

• The ED program office will develop priorities and monitor projects for alignment with the Department's strategic plan, with principles for high-quality professional development, and with high standards for content and student performance.
Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education (ENC)
2. Contribute to the improvement of the teaching and learning of all students by providing access to high-quality instructional materials and information about exemplary programs in mathematics and science education for elementary and secondary schools. 2.1 Volume of customer requests. The number of requests for products available through ENC and "hits" on electronic sites will increase by 10 percent annually.

2.2 Utility. At least 80 percent of customers who use ENC products will report that the products meet their needs in terms of accessibility and quality.

2.1 ENC reports, 1998; national evaluation, 2000.

2.2 Customer surveys, 2000; national evaluation, 2000.

• The ED program office will work with the Department's leadership teams, NSF, other agencies, and the ENC to develop comprehensive strategies for disseminating products to target audiences, tracking use of products, and obtaining customer feedback to ensure that the products are used effectively to improve mathematics and science education.
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS)
3. Contribute to the improvement of the teaching and learning of all students by expanding the cadre of highly accomplished teachers. 3.1 Standards and assessments developed Standards and assessments developed, approved, and offered by the NBPTS will increase annually, reaching a cumulative total of at least 25 teaching fields by the year 2002. By 1998, standards and assessments were developed, approved, and offered for 7 teaching fields.

3.2 Teachers certified. The number of teachers who will be awarded NBPTS will increase annually, reaching a cumulative total of 105,000 by the year 2006. By 1998, 911 teachers had been awarded NBPTS certification.

3.1 NBPTS reports, 1998.

3.2 NBPTS reports, 1998.

• The ED program office will work with the NBPTS to develop strategies to utilize NBPTS-certified teachers as resources for other ED programs and projects.

• The ED program office will work with the NBPTS to encourage and enlist states, local school districts, education organizations and business and industry to provide financial aid and other incentives to teachers seeking NBPTS certification.


Fund for the Improvement of Education -- $105,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To support nationally significant and innovative projects for improving education.
Objective Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Support the Department's strategic priorities in elementary and secondary education. 1.1 High quality. Projects funded will support the priorities and be of high quality. 1.1 Peer reviewer comments, 1998; annual review by Assistant Secretary's Office, 1998. • Select highly qualified reviewers.
2. Support the development of voluntary national tests in fourth- grade reading and eighth-grade math. 2.1 National tests. National tests in reading and math will be developed and tested. 2.1 National Academy of Sciences evaluation, 1999. • Provide necessary funding to National Assessment Governing Board.
3. Recognize effective schools and teachers. 3.1 Support effective schools and teachers. Support will be provided each year for Blue Ribbon Schools and Christa McAuliffe Fellowships. 3.1 Annual review of proposals, 1998. • Revise national panel review process for Blue Ribbon Schools.


Javits Gifted And Talented Students Education-- $ 6,500,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve the teaching and learning of gifted and talented students through research, demonstration projects, personnel training, and other activities of national significance.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Conduct research and evaluation on gifted and talented education that improve the identification and teaching of gifted and talented students, emphasize high levels of performance for all students, and promote total school improvement. 1.1 Quality of research and evaluations. Research and evaluations conducted by the National Center are high quality.

1.2 Effective dissemination. The Center's dissemination activities are effective, i.e., appropriate audiences are aware of, have access to, and receive research products and the results of evaluations in appropriate formats.

1.3 Utility. More than 80 percent of recipients will report that the Center's research products and evaluation results contribute to their knowledge, skills, or professional work.

1.1 Expert panel review, 1999.

1.2 Internal quality control and external reviews, 1998; customer surveys, 1999.

1.3 Customer surveys, 1999.

• Collaborate with national, state, and local associations and agencies to develop research plans to improve gifted and talented education.

• Conduct internal and external reviews to assure that the Center's research plans are cohesive and comprehensive.

• Strengthen peer reviews and the monitoring of Center-supported projects and evaluations to assure that products are useful and of high-quality.

• Facilitate collaboration between the Center and the projects it evaluates in order to foster continuous improvement.

2. Develop models for developing the talents of students who are economically disadvantaged, are limited English proficient, and/or have disabilities. 2.1 Student identification. Strategies developed by Javits projects will increase the diversity of students identified as gifted and talented.

2.2 Classroom instruction. A majority of teachers who receive Javits services will report improved capacity to meet the needs of gifted and talented students.

2.3 Student performance. At least 80 percent of teachers who receive services from Javits projects will report improvements in student attendance, engagement, and/or performance.

2.1 Project reports, 1998; national evaluation, 1999.

2.2 Project reports, 1998; national evaluation and customer surveys, 1999.

2.3 Project reports, 1998; national evaluation and customer surveys, 1999.

• Collaborate with other programs and agencies to coordinate initiatives in gifted and talented education.

• Work with national, state, and local associations and agencies to develop a national R&D agenda, disseminating products, and implementing effective research-based practices.

• Provide online and/or print access to challenging teaching, content, and student performance standards and to exemplary materials in gifted and talented education.

3. Demonstrate leadership in supporting and strengthening gifted and talented education and broadening its impact on total school improvement. 3.1 Utility. A majority of recipients of Javits products and participants in Javits-supported activities will report that these services contributed to their work in gifted and talented education. 3.1 National evaluation and customer surveys, 1999. • Address important issues in gifted and talented education and facilitate networking among key practitioners through activities such as conferences and technical assistance.


Eisenhower Regional Mathematics and Science Education Consortia -- $25,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To contribute to the improvement of mathematics and science education by (1) providing technical assistance to support implementation of teaching methods and assessment tools, (2) disseminating exemplary mathematics and science education instructional materials, and (3) coordinating resources for improving mathematics and science education.

Objective

Indicators

Data Source/Next Update

Strategies

Technical assistance
1. Provide high-quality technical assistance (Includes planning assistance, technical assistance, and training.) 1.1 Alignment with standards. The content of Consortia technical assistance will be explicitly aligned with high content and performance standards and/or will be focused on assisting in the implementation of high standards and practices related to their attainment.

1.2 Improvements in participants' practice. Teachers, administrators, and providers of professional development who participate in the Consortia's continuing technical assistance will report improvement in their practice. Baseline: 62% of participants said they had incorporated some new behavior into their jobs as a result of the Consortia-sponsored professional development. (National Evaluation, SRI, International, 1998.)

1.1 Consortia reports, 1998, 1999, 2000); external evaluation 1999, 2000.

1.2 Consortia reports, 1998, 1999, 2000; external evaluation, 1999, 2000.

• The ED program office will work with the Department's initiatives leadership teams and Executive Management Council and with the National Science Foundation to develop and implement integrated plans for work in mathematics and science education.

• The ED program office will work with the Consortia and professional organizations to align efforts for state and local mathematics and science education with high content and student performance standards.

• With the advice and guidance of their regional boards, the Consortia shall set priorities for technical assistance activities in their regions.

Dissemination and coordination of resources
2. In coordination with the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC), disseminate information about promising and exemplary practices in mathematics and science education. 2.1 Utility. A majority of the recipients of Consortia and ENC products and resources will report that the products have contributed to improving their work. 2.1 Consortia reports, 1998, 1999, 2000; external evaluation, 1999, 2000. • The ED program office will work with the Consortia and ENC to develop comprehensive strategies for disseminating products to target audiences, tracking use of products, and obtaining customer feedback.

• With the guidance of their regional boards, the Consortia shall prepare and implement a strategic outreach plan to identify key stakeholders and solicit their collaboration.

3. Contribute to collaboration and networking with targeted groups within and/or across states. 3.1 Impact on collaboration and networking. At least 80 percent of members of Consortia teams and networks will report that value was added in one or more of the following ways: strengthening relationships; increasing service coordination; increasing access to resources; or leveraging resources. Baseline: As of 1996, 67 % of members of Consortia teams/networks said membership had helped them obtain ideas/contacts that would strengthen their work. (National Evaluation, SRI International, 1998.) 3.1 Customer surveys, 1999, 2000.


21st Century Community Learning Centers Program -- $200,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To enable rural and inner-city public elementary and secondary schools, or consortia of such schools, to plan, implement, or expand projects that benefit the educational, health, social service, cultural and recreational needs of their communities.
Objective Indicator Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Enhance learning opportunities for children and youth in the core curriculum areas. 1.1 Reading/literacy. Community Learning Centers will report higher reading achievement among students participating in reading/literacy activities annually beginning in 1998.

1.2 Mathematics. Centers will report higher mathematics achievement among students participating in mathematics activities annually beginning in 1998.

1.3 Science. Centers will report higher science achievement among the students participating in science activities annually beginning in 1998.

1.4 Participant satisfaction. Students participating in Center programs will report them to be beneficial, enjoyable and of high quality.

1.5 Social/recreational services. Participants receiving social and recreational services from Centers will report that those services are beneficial, of high quality, and supportive of learning.

1.1 Planned external evaluation, 1999.

1.2 Planned external evaluation, 1999.

1.3 Planned external evaluation, 1999.

1.4 Planned external evaluation, 1999.

1.5 Planned external evaluation, 1999.

• Establish an absolute competitive priority for programs that offer expanded learning opportunities for children and that contribute to reduced drug use and violence.

• Establish a competitive preference to programs that provide services in core subjects such as reading, mathematics or science.

• Establish technical assistance support network for grantees to ensure quality of implemented programs.

2.Encourage positive changes in behavior and attitudes of participating students. 2.1 Student behavior. Centers will report positive trends in behavior among participants on measures such as regular school attendance, taking of advanced or more difficult courses, decreasing disciplinary actions.

2.2 Student attitudes. Center participants will report positive changes in how they view school and in their desire to participate in more Community Learning Center programs.

2.1 Grantee reports, 1999; planned external evaluation, 1999.

2.2 Grantee reports, 1999; planned external evaluation, 1999.

• Provide quality enhancing workshops and technical assistance to Center staffs.
3.Encourage positive changes in attitudes and behavior of parents and community members. 3.1 Parent attitudes. Parents of Center participants will report positive changes in their attitudes about their children's learning, safety, behavior and future opportunities.

3.2 Parent and community involvement. Parents and community members will report greater involvement in the schools which have Community Learning Center programs and activities.

3.1 Center survey, 1999; planned external evaluation, 1999.

3.2 Center survey, 1999; planned external evaluation, 1999.

• Provide quality enhancing workshops and technical assistance to Centers.


National Writing Project -- $5,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve the quality of student writing and learning, and the teaching of writing as a learning process in the nation's classrooms.

Objective

Indicators

Sources and Next Update

Strategies

1. Support and promote the establishment of teacher training programs designed to improve the writing skills of teachers and students. 1.1 Teacher participation. The number of teachers participating in the National Writing Project (NWP) will increase annually and will include teachers from many disciplines.

1.2 Number of project sites. According to peer reviews, an increasing number of NWP sites will perform more effectively than in previous years and at least 75% of sites will meet NWP's standards for renewal.

1.3 Improved student writing skills. Students taught by NWP teachers will show improved student writing skills.

1.1 U.S. Department of Education monitoring team annual site visit report (using baseline data from 1996-97) .

1.2 Annual self-evaluations from NWP Projects (using baseline data from 1994-95, and 1995-96 reports).

1.3 The NWP Annual Site Survey prepared by Inverness Research Associates (using baseline data from 1994-95 and 1995-96 surveys).

• Provide bridge services between the NWP and other student literacy programs, including Read*Write*Now/ America Reads Challenge and the Family Involvement Partnership.

• Monitor the peer review process that gives participating teacher/leaders the opportunity to evaluate the accomplishments of their peers at other NWP sites.

• NWP conducts annual peer review of each site and provides new or troubled sites experienced national reviewers and advisors. Department provides technical assistance to review process.

2. Disseminate effective practices and research findings regarding the teaching of writing to all teachers. 2.1 Teachers teaching their colleagues. An increasing number of NWP teachers will impart knowledge and skills learned at NWP summer workshops to other teachers in their school districts.

2.2 Development of alternative methods of student evaluations by teachers. An increasing number of NWP teachers will participate in directed research activities to develop alternative methods of student assessment in writing.

2.3 Sites adapted for special needs students. The NWP will adapt its basic teaching model to those sites with special needs, including English as a Second Language (ESL), socio-economic, or culturally diverse sites in urban and rural settings.

2.1 U.S. Department of Education monitoring team annual site visit report (using baseline data from 1996-97 report).

2.2 Annual self-evaluations from NWP projects (using baseline data from 1994-95, and 1995-96 reports).

2.3 The NWP Project Annual Site Survey prepared by Inverness Research Associates (using baseline data from 1994-95 and 1995-96 surveys).

• Provide a link between the NWP and ED customers interested in teaching methods of writing; make available a list of NWP sites at meetings, conferences, and exhibits as part of ED outreach services; and submit NWP materials for dissemination through the National Library of Education and ERIC

• Collaborate with the NWP to synthesize and disseminate - through publications, direct mail, and the Internet - teacher research produced by the NWP

• Disseminate information concerning the best practices of NWP project to encourage high-quality professional development opportunities


Civic Education -- $6,300,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To enhance the attainment of the third and sixth National Education Goals by educating students about the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Provide quality civic education curricula to elementary and secondary school students through the "We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution" program. 1.1 Participation in civic education program. An increasing number of students will participate in civic education programs. In the 1997-98 school year 4 million students will participate in "We the People" program. The program will be implemented in at least one school district in each congressional district in the nation.

1.2 National standards in civics and government. National standards in civics and government increasingly will be distributed to educators and used in the classroom.

1.1 Annual grantee project report and annual grant application March 1997, 1998.

1.2 National Standards for Civics and Government, Center for Civic Education, 1994; 1997.

• Disseminate information about the "We the People..." program through program coordinators and publications in order to increase awareness of the value of civic education among educators.

• Support, along with the Department of Justice, the development of curricular materials on the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

• Disseminate national standards in the content area of civics and government, including over the Internet.

• Participate in planning (see Objective 2).

2. Foster students' interest and ability to participate competently and responsibly in the democratic process. 2.1 Student knowledge about democracy and the Constitution. Students who participate in the civic education program will develop an increased understanding of the institutions of American democracy. External studies find that the program has positive, significant effects on students' knowledge about government, and the Constitution.

2.2 Citizenship skills. Students' ability to participate as citizens in the democratic process will be enhanced by the program's emphasis on problem solving activities, critical thinking, and improvement of communication skills.

2.1 Annual grantee project report and annual grant application, March 1997; 1998; Educational Testing Service controlled classroom evaluation of effectiveness of "We the People" curriculum, 1991; Council for Basic Education case study, 1991.

2.2 Annual project report and grant application, March 1998; Stanford University 1993.

• Participate in planning and administering the annual national hearings and student competition for "We the People" in Washington, D.C.

• Increase awareness of civic education through Department of Education public information vehicles.


International Education Program (Student Achievement Institute) -- $5,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To provide for an international education exchange program and the study of international programs and delivery systems.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Assist eligible countries in the adaptation and implementation of effective curricula and teacher training programs in civics and government education and economic education developed in the U.S. 1.1 Curriculum and training programs. An increasing percentage of educators from eligible countries will implement curriculum and training programs in civics and government education as well as economic education.

1.2 Student knowledge and skills. Participating students will demonstrate increased knowledge, skills, and traits of character in their understanding of civics, and democratic and economic principles.

1.3 Research and evaluation. To increase the capacity to evaluate the impact of educational program on educators and students.

1.1 Annual performance and evaluation report, 1998.

1.2 Survey of students, teachers, and scholars participating in the exchange of program will be conducted, 1998 and 1999.

1.3 Annual performance and evaluation report, 1998; survey of program participants 1998 and 1999.

• Disseminate information about exemplary curricula and teacher training programs.

• Provide technical assistance to the grantees on curricula frameworks.

• Conduct an annual site visit of selected programs in eligible countries to observe effects and impact of programs.

2. Create and implement educational programs for United States students which draw upon the experiences of emerging constitutional democracies. 2.1 Implementation of civic and economic education programs in the U.S. An increasing percentage of students, and teachers in the U.S. will participate in programs based on the experiences of emerging constitutional democracies. 2.1 Annual Performance Report, 1998. • Encourage grantees to share lessons about the development and implementation of the educational programs.

• Monitor program by conducting site visits of selected programs.

• Encourage grantees to collaborate on project activities in common sites in eligible countries.

3. Provide a means for the exchange of ideas and experiences in civics and government education and economic education among political, educational, and private sector leaders of the U.S. and participating eligible countries. 3.1 Exchange of ideas. An increasing number of educators and political and private sector leaders will participate in conferences, seminars, training and the exchange of ideas with participants from eligible countries. 3.1 Annual performance report, 1998.  

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