A r c h i v e d  I n f o r m a t i o n

U.S. Department of Education FY 1999 Annual Plan - February 27, 1998

Education Technology


Technology Literacy Challenge Fund--State and Local Programs for School Technology Resources and Technology Innovation Challenge Grants and National Activities -- $668,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To use educational technology as part of broader education reform that will provide new learning opportunities and raise educational achievement for all students.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Help improve student achievement in core subjects through federal educational technology programs operating in concert with other federal programs and state and local reform efforts. 1.1 Student performance on national tests. Between 1997 and 2001, the percentage of students who meet or exceed basic and proficient levels in reading and math on achievement tests such as NAEP will increase.

1.2 Student performance on state tests. Between 1997 and 2001, in communities where state and local education agencies have assessment systems linked to state standards in place, the percentage of students who meet or exceed these state and local performance standards will increase.

1.1 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and State NAEP assessments of reading and math, grades 4, 8, and 12, 1998; Technology Innovation Challenge grantee performance reports, annual, 1998; data from external program evaluator, 1998.

1.2 State and local education assessment data, 1998; Technology Innovation Challenge grantee performance reports, annual, 1998; data from external program evaluator, 1998.

• Provide financial and technical assistance. Coordinate with related technology initiatives, including other federal programs and state and local reform efforts.

• Support Technology Innovation Challenge Grant sites to increase student performance on state or school tests of academic achievement and on outcome measures related to the individual projects.

2. Help improve student's technology literacy through federal educational technology programs in concert with other federal programs and state and local reform efforts. 2.1 Student proficiency in technology. Between 1997 and 2001, the percentage of students who demonstrate proficiency in using multimedia computers and the Information Superhighway will increase. 2.1 Technology Innovation Challenge grantee performance reports, annual; 1998; data from external program evaluator , 1998; Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, follow-on evaluation, 1999. • Same strategies as for Objective 1.

• Support development of assessments that measure student technology proficiency through Technology Innovation Challenge Grants.

Teachers, Students, and Classroom
3. Provide practicing and prospective teachers with the professional development and support they need to help students learn through modern multimedia computers and the Information Superhighway. 3.1 Training tied to certification. Training in use of modern multimedia computers and the Information Superhighway for effective instruction will be increasingly required for certification and accreditation of practicing and prospective teachers, schools, and districts.

3.2 Staff access. Increasing proportions of practicing and prospective teachers, school administrators and school librarians will have access to modern multimedia computers and the Information Superhighway.

3.3 Staff training: Increasing proportions of practicing and prospective teachers, school administrators and school librarians will receive professional development that enables them to effectively use education technology to help students learn.

3.4 Support for staff. Teachers will have the administrative, technical, and local financial support they need to help students learn through modern multimedia computers and the Information Superhighway.

3.1 Advanced Telecommunications and U.S. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools Survey, 1996; Evaluation of Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, 1997; Longitudinal Survey of Schools, 1998.

3.2 Advanced Telecommunications and U.S. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools Survey, 1996; Evaluation of Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, 1997; Technology Innovation Challenge Grants monitoring and evaluation reports. Longitudinal Survey of Schools, 1998.

3.3 Same as 3.2.

3.4 Same as 3.2.

• Work with professional development programs to support teacher training for effective instructional uses of education technology.

• Connect with institutions for higher education (including colleges of education) for high quality preservice and inservice training.

• Continue to support Local Education Agencies (LEAs) through Technology Innovation Challenge Grant program, in partnership with other programs, to strengthen and support teacher knowledge of how to use technology to improve instruction.

• Develop models through the Technology Innovation Challenge Grants that provide teachers with sustained training and support in the use of technology for improved instruction.

• Review project reports for evidence of sustained teacher training and support of the innovation after the grant period has ended.

4. Encourage expansion of student access to modern multimedia computers. 4.1 Student access. The ratio of modern multimedia computers per student in public schools will increase to four to five students per modern multimedia computer by the year 2000.

4.2 Access in high-poverty schools. The access to education technology in high-poverty schools will be comparable to that in other schools.

4.3 Effective technologies. Students with disabilities will have access to effective technologies for learning.

4.4 Access outside school. An increasing percentage of schools will participate in programs that provide their teachers and students with access to modern multimedia computers and the Information Superhighway outside school.

4.5 Community access. An increasing percentage of low-income adults and youth will have access to modern multimedia computers in their communities to meet their information, education, and employment needs.

4.1 Advanced Telecommunications and U.S. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools Survey, 1997; Evaluation of Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, 1997; follow-on evaluation , 1999; Technology Innovation Challenge Grant monitoring reports from OERI project officers, annual, 1998; analyses of annual evaluation reports from project evaluators, annual, 1998; data from external program evaluator, 1998; Longitudinal Survey of Schools, 1998.

4.2 Same as 4.1.

4.3 Same as 4.1.

4.4 Same as 4.1.

4.5 Current Population Survey.

• Expand access to educational technology for high-poverty schools by reviewing state technology plans and providing financial and technical assistance.

• Encourage development and demonstration of effective strategies for improving the use of educational technology, particularly in high-poverty schools, through Technology Innovation Challenge Grants.

• Identify gaps in data sources on use and effectiveness of educational technology, and work to fill those information gaps.

• Provide information on the E-rate to schools, particularly schoolwide and high poverty schools.

5. Support linking all schools and classrooms to the Information Superhighway. 5.1 School access. The percentage of public schools with access to the Information Superhighway will increase to 95% by 2000.

5.2 Classroom access. The percentage of public school instructional rooms connected to the Information Superhighway will increase from 3% in 1994 to 14% in 1996, to 25% by 1998, and to an increasingly larger percentage thereafter.

5.1 Advanced Telecommunications and U.S. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools survey, 1997; Evaluation of Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, 1997; Longitudinal Survey of Schools, 1998.

5.2 Advanced Telecommunications and U.S. Public Elementary and Secondary Schools Survey, 1997; Evaluation of Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, 1997; Technology Innovation Challenge Grants monitoring reports; Longitudinal Survey of Schools, 1998.

• Work with the Federal Communications Commission to expand schools' access to advanced telecommunications.

• Expand classroom access to modern multi-media computers and the Information Superhighway through financial and technical assistance, dissemination of exemplary strategies and coordination across programs.

• Encourage development of structures for facilitating the operation of networked learning environments that draw on the resources of the Information Superhighway to improve student learning and achievement through Technology Innovation Challenge Grants.

6. Promote the availability of high-quality software and the resources of the Information Superhighway part of a challenging and enriching curriculum in every school. 6.1 Classroom use. An increasing percentage of teachers will integrate high-quality educational technology, high-quality software, and the Information Superhighway into their school curriculum for effective support of student learning.

6.2 Model programs. An increasing number of federally funded educational technology projects will be designated as outstanding by panels of experts.

6.1 Evaluation of Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, (1997); Longitudinal Survey of Schools (1998); Challenge Fund, follow-on evaluation (1999).

6.2 OERI program files, annual, 1998.

• Expand classroom access to engaging software and on-line resources of the Information Superhighway integrated with school curriculum through financial and technical assistance and coordination with related technology initiatives and activities.

• Assist in developing information on implementation and impact through monitoring and summarizing grantee reports, independent evaluations of the Technology Innovation Challenge Grants and other educational technology programs.

• Encourage Technology Innovation Challenge Grant sites to submit evidence of effectiveness in order to be designated by peers as either "promising" or "exemplary" by OERI approved standards.

7. Promote effective federal program management to support state and local implementation of statewide technology plans. 7.1 Technical assistance. Technical assistance and other support that the U.S. Department of Education provides, either directly or through its programs, is of high quality, useful, and judged by customers as adequate to meet their needs.

7.2 Private sector collaboration. Private sector participation in planning, support and implementation of statewide education technology plans will increase.

7.1 Customer survey and data provided by Technology Innovation Challenge grantees, annual, 1998; data from external program evaluator, 1998.

Data provided by Technology Literacy Challenge Grant grantees at end of five-year award period, 2000.

Data from Technology Literacy Challenge Fund application and outreach work, 1997.

Technology Literacy Challenge Fund, follow-on evaluation, 1999.

• Encourage states to develop and implement a framework for improvement and for effective and well-targeted state support that will enable them to respond to local feedback in a timely manner.

• Encourage states to use their federal funds strategically to include leveraging and coordination with other programs to support effective use of educational technology.

• Develop guides and models for state and local evaluations.

• Encourage private sector participation in promoting and supporting effective use of educational technology to increase educational achievement through Technology Innovation Challenge Grants and other programs.

• Use the TLCF performance report to report on States' progress relative to their own goals and to target program improvement efforts within states.

DEFINITIONS

Advanced telecommunications -- refers to modes of communication used to transmit information from one place to another including broadcast and interactive television, networked computers, etc.

Modern multimedia computers -- computers with CD-ROM, graphics, and sound capabilities.

Information technology -- technology that allows users to transmit, receive, and manipulate information, e.g., computers, telecommunications, Internet access.

Information Superhighway -- Internet, a network of networks all running TCP/IP protocols, sharing the same underlying network address space as well as the same domain name space, and interconnected into a network of information.


Regional Technology in Education Consortia-- $10,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve teaching and learning by providing technical assistance and professional development for the effective use of educational technology.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Promote effective use of technology for teaching and learning through professional development and technical assistance. 1.1 Regional Technology in Education Consortia (R*TEC) products, services, and information: The number of professional development, training, and technical services and products for staff, parents, community, and students -- including those provided through the Consortium, collaboration with other R*TECs and strategic alliances -- will increase annually.

1.2 Recipients of R*TEC products, services and information. The number of recipients (individuals or agencies including LEAs and SEAs) of the R*TEC services and products - including those developed and produced through the Consortium, collaboration with other R*TECs, and strategic alliances -- will increase annually.

1.3 Need, quality, and client satisfaction. Of the recipients of R*TEC products, services, and information, a growing proportion will indicate that these products and services are of high quality and meet unmet needs; have potential to improve teaching and learning; help them make better informed decisions about technology planning, equipment, and software purchases, and professional development activities -- and that some of these services are available only through the R*TECs.

1.4 Recipients representing underserved schools. In schools and communities of traditionally underserved populations (low income, urban, rural, and racial and language minority populations), there will be an annual increase in the number of recipients of service, products, and information; and an increase in the proportion of recipients indicating that they found them useful to practice.

1.1 ED program midpoint assessment, 1998; Annual Consortia project evaluations, 1998.

1.2 ED program midpoint assessment, 1998; Annual Consortia project evaluations, 1998.

1.3 ED program midpoint assessment, 1998; Annual Consortia project evaluations, 1998.

1.4 ED program midpoint assessment, 1998; annual Consortia project evaluations, 1998.

• Disseminate high-quality information and resources on the effective planning and use of technology in education.

• Assess customer satisfaction about major areas of work (through surveys, focus groups, or other means of inquiry) and will document and evaluate findings in order to improve strategies, products, and activities over time (e.g., alter content, level of intensity, format, key target audience).

• Collaborate with state education agencies (SEAs), LEAs and other educational entities in order to inform and support better planning, increased access to technologies, more advanced uses of technology, and enhanced instructional practice.

2. Leverage and coordinate resources for effective use of educational technology to improve teaching and learning. 2.1 Building and expanding quality alliances. The number of alliances and the services of alliances in which R*TECs are involved will increase each year.

2.2 Leverage. Each year at least 80% of alliance, consortium members and R*TECs responding to a survey will report that value was added by strengthening relationships, increasing service coordination, increasing their access to resources, and leveraging resources for greater impact on their clients.

2.1 ED program midpoint assessment, 1998; annual Consortia project evaluations, 1998.

2.2 ED program midpoint assessment, 1998; annual Consortia project evaluations, 1998.

• Use cooperative agreements as grant mechanism to facilitate collaboration among consortia, as well as with other educational technology initiatives.

• Support increasing communication and collaboration among consortia and coordination with other programs, particularly those with an educational technology focus.

• Assess the value and impact of alliances (through surveys, focus groups, or other means of inquiry) and use the findings to improve alliances over time.


Star Schools Program -- $34,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve student learning and teaching through the use of distance learning technologies.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Improve teaching and learning through increased access to distance education. 1.1 Underserved schools. The number of K-12 schools and adult basic education programs serving poor, urban, rural, and disadvantaged learners participating in distance education activities will increase annually.

1.2 Non-traditional settings. The number of learners in non-traditional settings (community centers, correctional facilities, etc.) who participate in distance education will increase annually.

1.3 Improved student performance. Students using distance education technologies will demonstrate increased performance.

1.4 Access to modern technologies. The number of students who have access to and benefit from new, advanced distance education technologies will increase annually.

1.1 Annual progress reports and project files, 1998; national program evaluation results, 1998.

1.2 Annual performance reports, 1998; national program evaluation results, 1998.

1.3 Same as 1.2.

1.4 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; project evaluation surveys, 1997; national program evaluation, 1998.

• Use NCES data to identify communities representing high populations of underserved students. Document and annually report on the number of under served learners in the program. Develop and update an on-line map of communities participating in the program.

• Encourage the delivery of services to learners outside classroom settings.

• Work with project and program evaluators to ensure that evaluation strategies capture the impact of the program on student outcomes.

2. Promote the delivery of challenging and engaging content in core subjects. 2.1 Alignment with standards. The content of programming will be aligned with local and state content standards.

2.2 Increased availability. The number of schools offering high school credit and advanced placement courses through distance education and enrollment will increase annually.

2.3 Increased elementary enrollment. Enrollment in reading, math, science, and foreign language programs for elementary students delivered via distance education will increase annually.

2.1 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; project evaluation surveys to teachers, 1997; national program evaluation, 1998.

2.2 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; project evaluation surveys to schools, 1998; national program evaluation, 1998.

2.3 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; project evaluation surveys to schools and teachers, 1997; national program evaluation, 1998.

• Provide access to standards materials on-line and via print (by subject area). Convene workshops and other activities and provide technical assistance about aligning standards to programming. Make TIMSS materials available to projects.

• Disseminate information about Star Schools course offerings through the Department's web site, workshops, and national meetings.

• Develop priorities for advanced placement and high school courses.

• Develop a priority for reading, math, science and foreign language programming for elementary students and their parents.

3. Promote excellence in teaching through sustained professional development and integration of new and multiple technologies into the curriculum. 3.1 Increased distance learning resources. The number and type of teacher professional development activities (courses, workshops, special broadcasts, etc.) offered via distance education technologies will increase annually.

3.2 Technological capability. The number of teachers and school administrators trained to use distance education technologies to enhance student learning will increase annually.

3.3 Instructional integration. The number and percentage of teachers who integrate distance education technologies into the curriculum will increase annually.

3.4 Improving practice. An increasing proportion of the teachers participating in the Star Schools' professional development or preservice education activities will report improvements in their ability to effectively incorporate technology into instruction.

3.1 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; project evaluation surveys to schools, 1997; national program evaluation, 1998.

3.2 Same as 1.4.

3.3 Same as 2.1.

3.4 Same as 3.3.

• Provide financial and technical assistance through workshops and teleconferences in collaboration with R*TEC and other programs in the Department to support staff professional development.

• Report annually on the progress that students are making as a result of participation in program activities.

4. Contribute to the available body of knowledge on use of technology to enhance learning to high standards for all students. 4.1 Increase research-based practice. Research, evaluation, and dissemination activities about the use and impact of distance learning will increase annually. 4.1 NCES distance education survey; distance learning resource network; Hezel reports; TLCF state reports; national program evaluation, 1998. • Develop papers, meetings, and products for effective use of distance education for better teaching and learning through collaboration with OERI's Institutes, centers, labs, and other programs, such as Challenge Grant, Challenge Fund, Eisenhower, and Title I.


Ready To Learn Television -- $7,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To develop, produce, and distribute video programming and educational materials for preschool and elementary school children and their parents, in order to facilitate the achievement of the National Education Goal for all children in America to start school ready to learn.
Objectives Indicators Sources and Next Update Strategies
1. Develop, produce, and distribute high quality televised educational programming and written educational materials, for preschool and elementary school children and their caregivers. 1.1 Distribution of educational television programs. Ready to Learn (RTL) programs will reach an increasing number of viewers. Each RTL educational program will reach between 4.5 and 6 million adults and young viewers weekly. The number of RTL participating stations has grown from 48 in 1995 to 120 in 1997. The current number represents a potential reach of 90% of the Nation.

1.2 Distribution of written educational materials. Increasing numbers of bimonthly newsletters and free books, through First Books Program, will be distributed. As of April 1997 over 650,000 books and 5.4 million newsletters had been distributed; 10% of newsletters were in Spanish. The goal for 1998 is to distribute 4 million additional newsletters.

1.3 Evaluation of RTL programming and outreach activities. Assessments of programming and materials indicate that viewers understand and appreciate RTL programs and reading materials.

1.1 Annual Performance Reports from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), 1998; reports from producers, WGBH-Boston and The Children's Television Workshop periodic.

1.2 CPB Annual Report, 1998.

1.3 Pre- and post-television production focus groups; research study measuring the value and educational effectiveness of RTL publications, 1997; CPB Survey of RTL Coordinators, 1998.

• Monitor progress of current projects and monitor program quality. For example, review performance reports from the CPB, the Children's Television Workshop, and WGBH - Boston.

• Participate in developing and supporting collaborations with other federal agencies, foundations, and related early childhood groups.

• Support the development and use of workshops to distribute educational material and information to caregivers and children.

• Provide educational materials through the RTL web site.

• Participate on the RTL Advisory Board.

2. Provide training to education personnel in the public television community so that they can train parents and caregivers to help children become ready to learn. 2.1 Training for parents and caregivers. The number of parents and caregivers trained will increase. To date 44,225 parents and 74,949 caregivers have been trained.

2.2 Evaluation of training quality. Continuous improvement will be built into training programs through periodic evaluation.

2.1 CPB Annual Performance Reports, 1998.

2.2 CPB Survey of RTL Coordinators, 1998.

• Support and develop workshops for training of RTL coordinators and caregivers.


Telecommunications Demonstration Project for Mathematics -- $2,000,000 (FY 99)
Goal: To improve the learning and teaching of mathematics through the use of technology.
Objectives Indicators Source and Next Update Strategies
1. Promote excellent teaching in mathematics through sustained professional development and teacher networks. 1.1 Increasing instructional resources. The number of high quality videos, curriculum materials, and on-line services for integrating of effective practices for mathematics instruction will increase annually.

1.2 Improving practice. The proportion of participating teachers reporting understanding and use of teaching methods that align with standards will increase annually.

1.3 Increasing participation in sustained professional development. The number of teachers sharing resources through on-line learning communities will increase annually. An increasing proportion of participating teachers will report improvements in practice resulting from sharing resources through on-line learning communities.

1.1 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; peer review of quality of materials, 1998; program evaluation tentatively planned for FY1998.

1.2 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; teacher surveys collected by the project, 1998; program evaluation tentatively planned for FY1998.

1.3 Annual review of grant performance reports, 1998; teacher surveys collected by the project, 1998; program evaluation tentatively planned for FY1998.

• Provide financial assistance to support development of videos, support materials, and online services.

• Based on needs identified by the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) data and other national math assessments, the Office of Educational Research and Improvement will work with PBS to develop a specific focus and content for math programming.

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