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Programmatic Frequently Asked Quesions

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  1. What is the duration of the award?
  2. Does the TQP program statute specify who is to participate in the induction program that a project provides for either the Pre-baccalaureate/5th year program or the Teaching Residency program?
  3. What is the link to the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA)?
  4. According to its definition [section 200(14)], an “induction program” for teachers must include application of empirically-based practice and “scientifically valid” research on instructional practices. What does “scientifically valid” mean?
  5. If the university wants to change the undergraduate initial teacher education program to include a pilot, etc., to begin a fifth year program, how do we pay and attract students to attend during the fifth year?
  6. May stipends or tuition reduction be given with TQP funds to candidates in the pre-bac/5th year programs (AP1)? May they cover teacher certification or state testing?
  7. Under AP1, if we are reforming the whole teacher preparation program to include a full year residency experience for our undergraduate student teachers, can funds be used for resident stipends?
  8. AP1 requires that applicants implement reforms in each teacher prep program. Does that mean that partnering IHEs must reform all teacher prep programs inclusive of all subjects and grade levels, including those not housed in the college of education?
  9. The Pre-baccalaureate/5th year Teacher Preparation program has required induction program component (section 202(d)(6) of the statute) that focuses on literacy training. How is the term “literacy” defined?
  10. What participants are eligible to enroll in the Teaching Residency Programs?
  11. May individuals who already have teacher certification in one area participate in the program as a way of getting certified in another area?
  12. How are participants selected for the Teaching Residency Programs?
  13. Who is responsible for tracking the residents’ 3-year service obligation?
  14. Under AP2, can a program allow students to start as undergrads, providing them with teacher prep courses (as part of the eventual Master's degree) during junior and senior years and then transfer those students into the 5th year residency program?
  15. Can this project be used to expand a current program to a 5-year master’s program?
  16. May a project prepare 5 separate cohorts of teachers in a teaching residency program?
  17. What is the minimum number of residents who must be in each cohort?
  18. May a teaching residency Master’s program be longer than one year?
  19. May a teaching residency program be focused to prepare teachers of English language learners?
  20. What is the number of hours per day or per week that teaching residents must spend in the classroom while they are in the program?
  21. May a teacher resident be in charge of his/her own classroom while the mentor teacher works in another classroom?
  22. What are the requirements for a mentor teacher in the residency program?
  23. Absolute Priority 2: Teacher Residency, states in Section II(3)(ii) that mentors shall have multiple extra responsibilities (ie. teacher leaders for residency, mentors, induction coaches, etc). Does each mentor really have to do all the things listed?
  24. May projects provide a stipend to an LEA’s teachers who assume responsibility for mentoring those who complete a pre-baccalaureate/5th year teacher preparation program?
  25. Where a teaching residency program relieves a mentor teacher of some of that teacher’s regular teaching responsibilities, may the project use program funds to pay for a replacement teacher to teach the mentor’s class(es)?
  26. May projects provide stipends or other supplemental compensation to mentors selected to participate in a Teaching Residency Program?
  27. What condition must a Teaching Residency participant meet in order to receive a living stipend or salary during the one-year residency period?
  28. May payment of the participants’ “one-year living stipend or salary ” be made with either TQP grant funds or with non-Federal funds?
  29. If the residency program can last 18 months, may applicants provide 18 months of stipends to residents?
  30. Can candidates enroll in the residency program, decline a stipend, and then not have to teach in the high need LEAs?
  31. How is “living stipend or salary” defined?
  32. May participants in a teaching residency be charged tuition?
  33. Do the subjects identified as "high-need" by the State govern which subjects a teaching residency program may train its participants to teach?
  34. How are the shortage areas determined?

1. What is the duration of the award?

These are 60 months or five-year grants; however, a partnership could elect to apply for fewer than five years. In the final year of a funded grant, a grantee may apply for up to a one-year no-cost extension. The Department may award additional funding for three years after the end of the grant for continued data-collection and evaluation purposes only.

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2. Does the TQP program statute specify who is to participate in the induction program that a project provides for either the Pre-baccalaureate/5th year program or the Teaching Residency program?

The definition of “induction program” in Section 200 of Title II of HEA, as amended, does not address how participants are to be selected. Under the Pre-baccalaureate/5th year program, grantees must create an induction program for new teachers. While one may presume that all new teachers employed by the partner “high-need LEA” (or at least its participating “high-need schools”) would benefit from this induction program, the statute does not speak to which new teachers would receive support from the TQP program induction activities.

The Teaching Residency program requires the project to provide an induction program for all participants in that program. (The selection of participants for the Teaching Residency program is governed by section 202(e)(2)(B) of the statute.

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3. What is the link to the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA)?

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_cong_public_laws&docid=f:publ315.110.pdf Provisions governing the Teacher Quality Partnership Grants program are on pages 122 Stat 3126 through 122 Stat 3147.

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4. According to its definition [section 200(14)], an “induction program” for teachers must include application of empirically-based practice and “scientifically valid” research on instructional practices. What does “scientifically valid” mean?

The statute defines “scientifically valid research” as research that “includes applied research, basic research, and field-initiated research in which the rationale, design, and interpretation are soundly developed in accordance with principles of scientific research.” The definition of “principles of scientific research” can be found in Sec. 200(18) of the HEA.

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5. If the university wants to change the undergraduate initial teacher education program to include a pilot, etc., to begin a fifth year program, how do we pay and attract students to attend during the fifth year?

You may want to apply under AP2 and create a residency program that occurs during the fifth year. While the statute doesn't prevent programs from recruiting and limiting their selection of participants to students who have attended the undergraduate program at the same school, we would encourage programs to also serve recent graduates of other four-year IHEs or mid-career professionals from outside the field of education who possess strong content knowledge or a record of professional accomplishment as well.

If your focus is more on reforming the whole teacher preparation program (undergrad/5th year), you may want to apply under AP1, which focuses on design and implementation of reforms within the teacher preparation program (and follow-up for teachers working in participating LEAs), not paying the costs of teacher candidates enrolled in the program.

You could also apply under both AP1 and AP2 and create two concurrent projects, one that focuses on reforming the teacher preparation program and one that creates a post-graduate residency program.

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6. May stipends or tuition reduction be given with TQP funds to candidates in the pre-bac/5th year programs (AP1)? May they cover teacher certification or state testing?

No. AP1 focuses on design and implementation of reforms within the teacher preparation program (and follow-up for teachers working in participating LEAs), not paying the costs of teacher candidates enrolled in the program. Thus, TQP funds cannot pay for tuition or other student support costs such as certification or state testing.

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7. Under AP1, if we are reforming the whole teacher preparation program to include a full year residency experience for our undergraduate student teachers, can funds be used for resident stipends?

No. While the addition of a more intensive clinical experience to the teacher preparation program is a valuable change (see HEA section 202(d)(2) and its inclusion in AP1), AP1 focuses on design and implementation of reforms within the teacher preparation program (and follow-up for teachers working in participating LEAs), not paying the costs of teacher candidates enrolled in the program. Thus, TQP funds can be used to create and implement a clinical "residency" experience but it cannot pay resident stipends. For the residency program, HEA section 202f(2)((B)(i) (like AP2) expressly provides that those eligible to participate in teaching residencies must be recent graduates of a four-year IHE or mid-career professionals from outside the field of education who possess strong content knowledge or a record of professional accomplishment. Only post-graduate residency programs that meet the statutory requirements (including mentors and service in high-need LEAs) outlined under AP2 can provide stipends and other incentives to its residents.

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8. AP1 requires that applicants implement reforms in each teacher prep program. Does that mean that partnering IHEs must reform all teacher prep programs inclusive of all subjects and grade levels, including those not housed in the college of education?

The required reforms need to permeate to all of the institutions’ programs that prepare teachers, within the five year project period. Grantees need not reform all programs at once, nor begin the reforms in all of the institutions’ teacher preparation programs.

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9. The Pre-baccalaureate/5th year Teacher Preparation program has required induction program component (section 202(d)(6) of the statute) that focuses on literacy training. How is the term “literacy” defined?

The HEA does not define “literacy” so eligible partnerships may define the term as they believe is reasonable in the context of the projects they are proposing. Please bear in mind that the statute also contains other references to "literacy." Applicants need to define the term “literacy” consistently with regard to each of these different TQP program requirements.

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10. What participants are eligible to enroll in the Teaching Residency Programs?

As stated in section 202 (e)(2)(B)(i) of the HEA, eligible applicants are recent graduate of a four-year institution of higher education or a mid-career professional from outside the field of education possessing strong content knowledge or a record of professional accomplishment.

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11. May individuals who already have teacher certification in one area participate in the program as a way of getting certified in another area?

No. The definition of a “teaching residency program” in section 200(22) of the statute includes a provision requiring that the program be for “prospective teachers” who do not become fully certified and highly qualified until after they complete the one-year mentored residency component of the program. The intent of this program is thus to bring new teachers into classrooms.

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12. How are participants selected for the Teaching Residency Programs?

Please see section 202 (e)(2)(B)(iii) of the HEA.

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13. Who is responsible for tracking the residents’ 3-year service obligation?

The partnership.

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14. Under AP2, can a program allow students to start as undergrads, providing them with teacher prep courses (as part of the eventual Master's degree) during junior and senior years and then transfer those students into the 5th year residency program?

Yes, if the proposed master’s degree program requires rigorous academic coursework as a component of a teaching residency program as defined by the statute, including having the teaching residency program operate in the last year of the master’s degree program.

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15. Can this project be used to expand a current program to a 5-year master’s program?

According to HEA section 202f(2)((B)(i), which provides the basis for AP2, grant funds can only be used for activities related to the graduate residency experience. While the statute doesn't prevent a program from recruiting and preparing undergraduate pre-residency candidates, the grant funds cannot pay for the costs of these activities. For the residency program, HEA section 202f(2)((B)(i) (like AP2) expressly provides that those eligible to participate in teaching residencies must be recent graduates of a four-year IHE or mid-career professionals from outside the field of education who possess strong content knowledge or a record of professional accomplishment. Pre-program participants may take courses in preparation for the residency, but those pre-participants are not yet “residents” for the purposes of the grant and grant funds cannot pay for any of the activities or programs in the pre-graduate program nor for any of the costs associated with students that have not yet received their BA.

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16. May a project prepare 5 separate cohorts of teachers in a teaching residency program?

Yes. The statute does not specify how many cohorts of residents should be prepared within the grant period. Please note that if an applicant proposes to recruit and prepare candidates in years 4 and 5 of the grant, it will be expected to describe in its application its commitment to providing the required minimum two-year induction support beyond the 5-year grant period.

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17. What is the minimum number of residents who must be in each cohort?

There is no minimum. The statute does not specify the number of teachers required in each cohort.

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18. May a teaching residency Master’s program be longer than one year?

Yes, residency programs may last up to 18 months, as amended by Pub. L. 111-39. In that period, grantees must implement the teaching residency program, which must culminate in issuance of the master’s degree (and participants’ receipt of full certification and status of highly qualified teachers). TQP program funds may only be used to pay for residents’ stipends for one-year period of that program.

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19. May a teaching residency program be focused to prepare teachers of English language learners?

Yes, provided this focus is consistent with what the high-need subject areas identified by the partnering “high-need LEA.”

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20. What is the number of hours per day or per week that teaching residents must spend in the classroom while they are in the program?

This is determined by the project design prepared by the eligible partnership. The statute does not specify a specific number of hours per day/week that the resident must spend in the classroom. Residents are expected to teach alongside a mentor teacher (who is the teacher-of-record) for a full academic year.

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21. May a teacher resident be in charge of his/her own classroom while the mentor teacher works in another classroom?

No. The definition of a “teaching residency program” (section 200(22)) states that the resident “teaches alongside a mentor teacher, who is the teacher of record.” Moreover, under Title I, Part A of the ESEA, all teachers providing instruction in core academic subjects must already be highly qualified. Participants in the teaching residency program are, by definition, not yet highly qualified.

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22. What are the requirements for a mentor teacher in the residency program?

Please see section 202(e)(2)(A)(iii) and (iv) of the HEA.

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23. Absolute Priority 2: Teacher Residency, states in Section II(3)(ii) that mentors shall have multiple extra responsibilities (ie. teacher leaders for residency, mentors, induction coaches, etc). Does each mentor really have to do all the things listed?

Yes. But mentor’s principal responsibility is to be a mentor for the residents. While the other activities need to be implemented, he extent to which each mentor is actively involved in all of the other activities is up the applicant.

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24. May projects provide a stipend to an LEA’s teachers who assume responsibility for mentoring those who complete a pre-baccalaureate/5th year teacher preparation program?

For pre-baccalaureate/5th year preparation programs, the law permits projects to use program funds to provide stipends or other supplemental compensation, in the form of a bonus, differential, incentive, or performance pay, based on the mentor’s extra skills and responsibilities, to teachers who take on responsibilities for mentoring new teachers who have completed the program.

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25. Where a teaching residency program relieves a mentor teacher of some of that teacher’s regular teaching responsibilities, may the project use program funds to pay for a replacement teacher to teach the mentor’s class(es)?

Yes, as long as the LEA, under its established policies, would not pay for these kinds of replacement costs in the absence of the TQP project (which therefore would constitute impermissible supplanting of State or local funds). Where use of TQP program award would supplement the LEA’s use of funds, payment for the replacement teacher would constitute a reasonable and necessary cost under the cost principles in Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-87.

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26. May projects provide stipends or other supplemental compensation to mentors selected to participate in a Teaching Residency Program?

Yes, projects may use program funds to provide stipends or other supplemental compensation, as needed, in the form of a bonus, differential, incentive, or performance pay to mentor-teachers selected to work in the teaching residency program based on their extra skills and responsibilities.

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27. What condition must a Teaching Residency participant meet in order to receive a living stipend or salary during the one-year residency period?

Before receiving the living stipend or salary, a participant must have signed an Agreement to Serve prepared by the eligible partnership and containing (1) the information required by section 202(e)(2)(C)(iii) of the statute, and (2) such other information and assurances and the eligible partnership determines to be necessary. This information includes the participant’s promise, after completion of the program, to be a full-time teacher of a “high-need subject” in a high-need school served by the partner high-need LEA for three academic years, or to repay the salary or stipend. Provisions governing the participant’s responsibility for providing updating information to the partnership to permit it to confirm whether or not the participant is meeting the service obligation, other relevant terms such as provision for deferral of the service obligation for cause, are addressed in section 202(e)(2)(C)(iv) of the statute.

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28. May payment of the participants’ “one-year living stipend or salary ” be made with either TQP grant funds or with non-Federal funds?

Yes.

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29. If the residency program can last 18 months, may applicants provide 18 months of stipends to residents?

No. The statute states that stipends may be only one year. Whether this year is a 12-month period or an academic year is up to the eligible partnership.

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30. Can candidates enroll in the residency program, decline a stipend, and then not have to teach in the high need LEAs?

Candidates may do so to avoid the service requirement in HEA section 202(e)(2)(C)(iii). Yes. But the eligible partnership that administers the TQP residency program may, if it chooses, require candidates as a condition of participation in the residency to repay TQP or match funds that it expends on the residency if the candidates do not meet a similar service obligation.

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31. How is “living stipend or salary” defined?

The term ‘living stipend or salary’ is not defined in the statute. Therefore, the applicant would describe in the budget and budget narrative (and perhaps elsewhere in the application) the amount that it proposes to provide as a living stipend or salary to participants to be served under the program.

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32. May participants in a teaching residency be charged tuition?

Yes.

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33. Do the subjects identified as "high-need" by the State govern which subjects a teaching residency program may train its participants to teach?

No. By law, an eligible partnership must target their teaching residency programs to high-need subject areas as determined by the needs of the “high-need LEA” in the partnership. See Section 202(e)(1)(A) of the statute. Thus, how a State may define phrases such as “high-need” or “critical-need fields” is not determinative.

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34. How are the shortage areas determined?

High-need subject areas are identified by the eligible partnership and its partner LEA.

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Last Modified: 07/07/2014