Skip Program Navigation
Teacher Quality Partnership Grant Program

   Current Section
Performance
 Office of Innovation and Improvement Home
Budget and Match Frequently Asked Quesions

  Select a link below to jump to the relevant page section.
  1. Is there a matching requirement?
  2. What if I can’t meet the match?
  3. Will requesting a waiver hurt the chances for an application’s approval?
  4. May a project pay mentor teacher salaries to meet the match? What about paying university faculty salaries?
  5. Where might applicants look for possible organizations to assist with the non-Federal match?
  6. May all grantees, regardless of who is the fiscal agent, charge indirect costs on their TQP program grant. In what amount? And may a grantee claim as match any portion of its indirect costs that it does not charge to its TQP program grant award?
  7. The program statute contains a 2% limitation on administrative expenses. Does this refer to just the fiscal agent of the grant or to all TQP grant funds used in the partnership?
  8. What does the Department mean by a “Restricted Indirect Cost Rate”?

1. Is there a matching requirement?

Yes, this program requires a 100% match from the eligible partnership. This is described in Section 203(c)(1) of the statute. Additionally the statute allows for the Secretary to waive all or part of the matching requirement as described in Section 203(c)(2) of the statute. For more information, see pages 18-19 of the application package.

 TOP


2. What if I can’t meet the match?

Applicants may apply for a match waiver, as allowed by Section 203(c)(2). In such a waiver, applicants may address evidence of reductions to the university budgets and of severe economic distress affecting partner LEAs and other partners. Waivers should be for up to two years, although future waivers may be considered when the time comes. For more information, see pages 18-19 of the application package.

 TOP


3. Will requesting a waiver hurt the chances for an application’s approval?

Applicants that believe they need a waiver of the match requirement have a right to request one, and peer reviewers will be instructed not to deduct points to an applicant that has requested a waiver.

 TOP


4. May a project pay mentor teacher salaries to meet the match? What about paying university faculty salaries?

The match, like federally funded activities, must meet the “supplement not supplant” requirement. This means that a grantee may not use federal dollars, or match dollars, to pay for activities that would already be happening without the grant. However, if staff is contributing additional effort towards the grant in addition to their regular duties, then that may be paid for by federal funds or matching funds.

 TOP


5. Where might applicants look for possible organizations to assist with the non-Federal match?

One place to search is the i3 Foundation Registry. This site was established to help the Investing in Innovation (i3) grants secure their required private sector match. Note that the content on the site refers to the specific regulations that guide i3, and not TQP.

 TOP


6. May all grantees, regardless of who is the fiscal agent, charge indirect costs on their TQP program grant. In what amount? And may a grantee claim as match any portion of its indirect costs that it does not charge to its TQP program grant award?

All grantees are entitled to charge indirect costs (for institutions of higher education, the cost principles in Office of Management and Budget Circular A-21 (relocated to 2 CFR Part 220) refers to these as Facilities and Administration (F&A) costs). Given the program’s “supplement, not supplant,” requirement, by rule, the amount of indirect costs that the eligible partnership may charge to TQP grant funds is determined through use of a “restricted indirect cost rate”, and the amount the eligible partnership as a whole charges may not exceed the amount derived from use of the lead applicant’s restricted indirect cost rate. In this regard, if the lead applicant is an LEA, the rate is the LEA’s approved restricted indirect cost rate. If the lead applicant is an IHE, the rate is its approved restricted indirect cost rate or, if it does not have such a rate or does not want to calculate one, eight (8) percent. See sections 75.563, 75.564, and 76.564 of EDGAR.

 TOP


7. The program statute contains a 2% limitation on administrative expenses. Does this refer to just the fiscal agent of the grant or to all TQP grant funds used in the partnership?

The statute imposes a two percent (2%) limitation on the amount of administrative costs that a grantee or any other entity may charge to program funds. The Department does not have a standard definition of “administrative costs.” Therefore, applicants should use their own agency’s fiscal rules and procedures to determine what proposed costs are attributable to this category of costs and to adhere to the cost limitation.

 TOP


8. What does the Department mean by a “Restricted Indirect Cost Rate”?

A "restricted indirect cost rate" is the indirect cost rate that recipients must use to charge program funds to indirect costs under any Department program with a supplement, not supplant requirement. The formula essentially reduces the regular “unrestricted” indirect cost rate that recipients use to calculate permissible indirect costs based on the direct cost pool by eliminating from the rate costs that the recipient would have anyway whether or not it had a Federal grant.

It is likely that each IHE and LEA already has a restricted indirect cost rate approved by a cognizant agency. If an IHE does not yet have one, sections 75.563 and 76.564 of EDGAR permits it to use a restricted indirect cost rate of eight percent until its cognizant agency approves a rate for the IHE.For more information, see page 17 of the Application Package. Click here

more FAQs about indirect cost rates.

 TOP


Print this page Printable view Bookmark  and Share
Last Modified: 07/07/2014