Teaching American History

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New Jersey 2010 Grant Abstracts

Grantee Name:

Allamuchy Township School District

Project Name:

James Madison Seminar: Sussex-Warren History Consortium

Project Director:

Dr. Bradford P. Wilson

Funding for Years 1-3:

$946,425

Number of Teachers Served Overall:

45

Number of School Districts Served:

16

Grade Levels:

6-12

Partners:

Princeton University, Philadelphia Museum of Art, National Association of Scholars

Topics:

Year 1: American Revolution, the Constitution
Year 2: Federalist Era, Jeffersonian Republicanism, John Marshall, Jacksonian Democracy
Year 3: Civil War and Reconstruction
Year 4: Gilded Age and Progressive Era, American Empire, the Great War
Year 5: New Deal, World War II and Early Cold War, Vietnam War and the End of the Cold War, the Constitution and the Culture War

Methods:

Summer seminars, lectures, workshops, field studies

A recent survey of teachers in these New Jersey school districts revealed an interest in interacting with historical experts and participating in professional development regarding primary source development, integration and investigation. In this project, 45 middle and high school teachers will engage in a 5-year examination of the major ideas, people, events and developments in American history from a constitutional perspective. Each year, the focal point will be an 8-day summer seminar at Princeton University to address content and make teachers aware of the relatively recent emphasis on social history. An additional 3.5 days of after-school professional development will be conducted each year to focus on content, curriculum and pedagogy. At least 85 teachers will be recruited, with 45 selected randomly as the experimental group and approximately 40 constituting the control group. Content time periods were selected because of the dramatic and polarizing debates that decisively shaped American political and constitutional perspectives for succeeding generations. These historical developments demonstrate the evolution of freedom and democracy as well as constitutional norms and understandings. Attention will be given to developing the pedagogical skills to guide teachers and their students in gathering, examining and organizing historical data to make historical explanations, with particular emphasis on historical writing. Participating teachers will receive New Jersey professional development credit hours and may also receive graduate credits from the College of Education at Ashland University in Ohio upon payment of tuition. The project Web site will feature video recordings of the scholarly lectures, examples of lesson plans and other materials developed by the teachers.

Grantee Name:

Bridgeton Public Schools

Project Name:

The Bridge Town Liberty Fellowship

Project Director:

James M. Coyne

Funding for Years 1-3:

$498,780

Number of Teachers Served Overall:

30

Number of School Districts Served:

1

Grade Levels:

K-12

Partners:

Rutgers University, Franklin's Opus, Bill of Rights Institute, American Institute for History Education, Cumberland County Historical Society

Topics:

Year 1: Out of an Empire
Year 2: From Unity to Division
Year 3: From Division to Unity — War, Reconstruction and World Power
Year 4: Liberal Democracy vs. Totalitarianism
Year 5: Liberty and Tyranny

Methods:

Colloquia, summer institutes, videoconferences

In this southeastern New Jersey district, nearly 30 percent of the population lives in poverty and all seven of Bridgeton's schools have been identified as in need of improvement. Fellows will participate in 2-day fall and winter colloquia, a day of CICERO training, 2 half-days of research and review, and a 3-day summer institute each year. In addition, they will attend 12 live evening videoconferences presented by historians and teachers from across the country. Every fellow will be expected to develop one classroom lesson or activity each year. In addition, five experienced teachers will be recruited for training as content specialists; they will assist project staff with coaching and mentoring and will eventually provide professional development to teachers outside of the project. Participants will work with scholars and historians to research history, write historical narratives, create substantive lessons and generate Web-based history activities; these will be peer-reviewed on the wiki section of the project Web site. Fellows will learn to use binary Paideia and the Teaching History Frameworks, plus resources from CICERO, the History Channel, SojournerHistory and other sources. Fellows who complete requirements will be eligible for graduate credits. Project partners have agreed to sustain activities beyond the grant period through chat rooms, videoconferencing, "Talking History" and bulletin boards. The project will publish a compilation of its events, materials and fellows' work on a Web site, through which they will be available for training other teachers.

Grantee Name:

Camden City Schools

Project Name:

The Walt Whitman Liberty Fellowship

Project Director:

Loretta Gronau

Funding for Years 1-3:

$497,994

Number of Teachers Served Overall:

200

Number of School Districts Served:

2

Grade Levels:

K-12

Partners:

Rutgers University, Franklin's Opus, Bill of Rights Institute, Camden County Historical Society, American Institute for History Education, National Council for the Social Studies

Topics:

Year 1: The Empire vs. the Colonies
Year 2: From Unity to Division: the Agrarian South and the Industrial North
Year 3: From Division to Unity: War, Reconstruction and World Power
Year 4: Liberal Democracy vs. Totalitarianism
Year 5: Liberal Democracy vs. Totalitarianism Redux

Methods:

Colloquia, field studies, summer institutes, evening videoconferences open to all teachers, wikis, blogs, online resources, classroom-based coaching

New Jersey's Camden City and Camden Diocese districts operate in one of the nation's poorest cities, where 29 of the 33 schools are in need of improvement. Teachers who have had limited access to professional development will be able to participate in activities that include two multiday colloquia, a 2-day field study, 4.5 days of research and review, 12 live videoconferences, and a 5-day summer institute, all eligible for graduate credit. These events will combine content information with instruction on using Web 2.0 resources and powerful classroom strategies. Project leaders will recruit 40 teachers into each 1-year program, screening for those from schools with the greatest need. In addition, the project will help five teachers become content specialists; they will receive additional training so they can replicate project activities for other history teachers. The project aims to immerse fellows in proven, research-based strategies for teaching traditional American history, thus enabling them to engage students in a higher level of thinking and learning. Fellows will learn to use the American Institute for History Education's history frameworks and signature strategies, and they will also become familiar with binary Paideia as an organizing tool for classroom instruction. Using their access to CICERO and other online resources, fellows will research and develop lessons that apply the Understanding by Design approach. Lesson plans and other project work will be published on the project Web site, and teacher- and student-created video resources will be available on TeacherTube.com. Fellows will work with content specialists to help other history teachers by modeling, reviewing lesson plans and coaching.

Grantee Name:

Ewing Public Schools

Project Name:

James Madison Seminar: Ewing History Consortium

Project Director:

Dr. Bradford P. Wilson

Funding:

$946,425

Number of Teachers Served Overall:

45

Number of School Districts Served:

5

Grade Levels:

6-12

Partners:

Princeton University, National Association of Scholars, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Topics:

Year 1: American Revolution, the Constitution
Year 2: Federalist Era, Jeffersonian Republicanism, John Marshall, Jacksonian Democracy
Year 3: Civil War and Reconstruction
Year 4: Gilded Age and Progressive Era, American Empire, the Great War
Year 5: New Deal, World War II and Early Cold War, Vietnam War and the End of the Cold War, the Constitution and the Culture War

Methods:

Summer seminars, lectures, workshops, field studies

Teachers in these New Jersey school districts recently expressed an interest in receiving more U.S. history professional development, interaction with historical experts and collaborative opportunities to develop new lesson plans and teaching strategies. In this project, 45 middle and high school teachers will engage in a 5-year examination of the major ideas, people, events and developments in American history from a constitutional perspective. Each year, the focal point will be an 8-day summer seminar at Princeton University to address content and make teachers aware of the relatively recent emphasis on social history. An additional 3.5 days of after-school professional development will be conducted each year to focus on content, curriculum and pedagogy. At least 85 teachers will be recruited, with 45 selected randomly as the experimental group and approximately 40 constituting the control group. Content time periods were selected because of the dramatic and polarizing debates that decisively shaped American political and constitutional perspectives for succeeding generations. These historical developments demonstrate the evolution of freedom and democracy as well as constitutional norms and understandings. Attention will be given to developing the pedagogical skills to guide teachers and their students in gathering, examining and organizing historical data to make historical explanations, with particular emphasis on historical writing. Participating teachers will receive New Jersey professional development credit hours and may also receive graduate credits from the College of Education at Ashland University in Ohio upon payment of tuition. The project Web site will feature video recordings of the scholarly lectures, examples of lesson plans and other materials developed by the teachers. /p>

Grantee Name:

Linden Public Schools

Project Name:

James Madison Seminar: Union County History Consortium

Project Director:

Dr. Bradford P. Wilson

Funding for Years 1-3:

$951,675

Number of Teachers Served Overall:

45

Number of School Districts Served:

4

Grade Levels:

6-12

Partners:

Princeton University, Philadelphia Museum of Art, National Association of Scholars

Topics:

Year 1: American Revolution, the  Constitution
Year 2: Federalist Era, Jeffersonian Republicanism, John Marshall, Jacksonian Democracy
Year 3: Civil War and Reconstruction
Year 4: Gilded Age and Progressive Era, American Empire, the Great War
Year 5: New Deal, World War II and Early Cold War; Vietnam War and the End of the Cold War; the Constitution and the Culture War

Methods:

Summer seminars, lectures, workshops, field studies

Based on a needs assessment, American history teachers in these New Jersey districts are dissatisfied with their lesson plans, particularly the lack of emphasis on primary sources. In this project, 45 middle and high school teachers will engage in a 5-year examination of the major ideas, people, events and developments in American history from a constitutional perspective. Each year, the focal point will be an 8-day summer seminar at Princeton University to address content and make teachers aware of the relatively recent emphasis on social history. An additional 3.5 days of after-school professional development will be conducted each year to focus on content, curriculum and pedagogy. At least 85 teachers will be recruited, with 45 selected randomly as the experimental group and approximately 40 constituting the control group. Content time periods were selected because of the dramatic and polarizing debates that decisively shaped American political and constitutional perspectives for succeeding generations. These historical developments demonstrate the evolution of freedom and democracy as well as constitutional norms and understandings. Attention will be given to developing pedagogical skills to guide teachers and their students in gathering, examining and organizing historical data to make historical explanations, with particular emphasis on historical writing. Participating teachers will receive New Jersey professional development credit hours and may also receive graduate credits from the College of Education at Ashland University in Ohio upon payment of tuition. The project Web site will feature video recordings of the scholar lectures and examples of lesson plans and other materials developed by the teachers.

Grantee Name:

Ridgewood Public Schools

Project Name:

Profiles and Perspectives of Our American Identity

Project Director:

Hank Bitten

Funding for Years 1-3:

$999,479

Number of Teachers Served Overall:

75 to 100

Number of School Districts Served:

14

Grade Levels:

K-12

Partners:

Princeton University, Columbia University, George Washington University, Rutgers University, Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, Hermitage Museum

Topics:

Year 1: Colonial America and the Early Republic
Year 2: 19th Century America
Year 3: 20th Century America
Year 4: American Foreign Policy
Year 5: Critical American Issues

Methods:

History seminars, field studies, summer academies, classroom observations, Lesson Study

The districts in this northern New Jersey consortium vary in size and demography, and many face challenges that have prevented them from offering rigorous history professional development. Profiles and Perspectives of Our American Identity will engage teachers in annual activities that include two full-day history seminars, one field research experience, a variety of supplemental activities (e.g., lesson study, research) and a 5-day summer academy. Every year, participants will have at least 112 hours of professional development in content, methods and research. A core group of 40 teachers, with a minimum of two from each district, will participate for all five years and will be selected mainly from schools in need of improvement. An additional 15 to 20 teachers will participate each year based on need and availability. The project will invite teachers to compare and contrast local, regional and national events in American history through profiles of well-known and ordinary individuals and their perspectives on ideas, decisions, events and issues. For example, the profiles (based largely on personal papers and primary sources) from Colonial America will include Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Native Americans, indentured servants and farmers. Their perspectives on such issues as government and law, steps toward unity, social and economic conditions, family life and religion will be considered. Project staff and historians will help participants learn to employ inductive instruction, address diverse learning styles, use "History Habits of Mind" and essential questions, and conduct historical research. Teachers will develop classroom libraries of teaching materials and, through lesson study, will collaborate to design, deliver, observe and refine lesson plans.

Grantee Name:

West Orange High School District

Project Name:

James Madison Seminar: Essex County History Consortium

Project Director:

Dr. Bradford P. Wilson

Funding for Years 1-3:

$946,425

Number of Teachers Served Overall:

45

Number of School Districts Served:

4

Grade Levels:

6-12

Partners:

Princeton University, Philadelphia Museum of Art, National Association of Scholars

Topics:

Year 1: American Revolution, the Constitution
Year 2: Federalist Era, Jeffersonian Republicanism, John Marshall,  Jacksonian Democracy
Year 3: Civil War and Reconstruction
Year 4: Gilded Age and Progressive Era, American Empire, the Great War
Year 5: New Deal, World War II and Early Cold War; Vietnam War and the End of the Cold War; the Constitution and the Culture War

Methods:

Summer seminars, lectures, workshops, field studies

A large majority of history teachers in these New Jersey districts expressed interest in having professional development opportunities to interact with historical experts, enrich their content knowledge and integrate primary sources into classrooms. In this project, 45 middle and high school teachers will engage in a 5-year examination of the major ideas, people, events and developments in American history from a constitutional perspective. Each year, the focal point will be an 8-day summer seminar at Princeton University to address content and make teachers aware of the relatively recent emphasis on social history. An additional 3.5 days of after-school professional development will be conducted each year to focus on content, curriculum and pedagogy. At least 85 teachers will be recruited, with 45 selected randomly as the experimental group and approximately 40 constituting the control group. Content time periods were selected because of the dramatic and polarizing debates that decisively shaped American political and constitutional perspectives for succeeding generations. These historical developments demonstrate the evolution of freedom and democracy as well as constitutional norms and understandings. Attention will be given to developing pedagogical skills to guide teachers and their students in gathering, examining and organizing historical data to make historical explanations, with particular emphasis on historical writing. Participating teachers will receive New Jersey professional development credit hours and may also receive graduate credits from the College of Education at Ashland University in Ohio upon payment of tuition. The project Web site will feature video recordings of the scholarly lectures and examples of lesson plans and other materials developed by the teachers.


 
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Last Modified: 11/23/2010