Teaching American History

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Hawaii 2007 Grant Abstract

Grantee Name:Hawaii Department of Education, HI
Project Name:Seedbeds of Virtue in American History: Teaching About Civic Virtues and Responsibility in American History
Project Director:Kathleen Nishimura
Funding:$999,404
Number of Teachers Served:585
Number of School Districts Served:1
Number of Students Served:18,720
Grade Levels:K-12
Partners:The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, National History Day, the Hawaii Council for the Humanities, Chaminade University of Honolulu, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, and the Judiciary History Center
Topics:Year 1, Family and Community in American History; Year 2, Service and Leadership in American History; Year 3, Voices of Conscience and Protest in American History
Methods:Summer institutes, workshops, graduate courses

In Year 1 of this professional development project, elementary school teachers will examine early communities of English settlers in Virginia and Massachusetts. Middle school teachers will study tariffs and slavery that caused division within the U.S. and led to the Civil War. High school teachers will look at European and Asian immigration to the U.S. during the late 19th and early 20th centuries as well as the impact of the Great Depression and World War II on American families. In Year 2, elementary teachers study European exploration of the Americas and the emergence of such leaders as George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. Middle school teachers examine the Articles of Confederation, compromises in the Constitution, and the 19th century suffrage movement. High school teachers will study Progressive Era reforms and assess the impact of the New Deal. In Year 3, elementary teachers will identify major events leading to the American Revolution and analyze the Declaration of Independence. Middle school teachers explore the origins and impact of the Bill of Rights, examine events leading to constitutional protection of African Americans and erosion of rights guaranteed by the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments. High school teachers will study non-violence in the early Civil Rights movement and trace the course of America's involvement in Vietnam.


 
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Last Modified: 10/23/2007