Teaching American History Grant Program

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New York 2005 Grant Abstracts

Grantee Name:Community School District 13 New York City Department of Education, Brooklyn, NY
Project Name:District 13 TAH Project
Project Director:Laurie Harriton (718) 935-4252
Funding:$452,657
Number of Teachers Served:160
Number of School Districts Served:1
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

This project was developed by District 13 in collaboration with Brooklyn College, the American Civil Rights Education Services, the Brooklyn Historical Society, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Partners also include the Brooklyn Museum, the City of New York Museum, and the South Street Seaport Museum. Participants will be drawn from American history teachers in the fourth, fifth and seventh grades. They will enhance their knowledge and teaching skills and create collaborations that support instruction by engaging in graduate-level courses each year, museum studies, seminars, and field trips. In addition, school-based professional development sessions will be conducted and curriculum will be created and aligned with state standards. Program content focuses on the following: (1) change and continuity in American democracy; (2) immigration and interactions among peoples; (3) economic and technological changes; and (4) America's changing role in the world. Local and primary resources will illustrate each key theme.

Grantee Name:Community School District 2, New York City Department of Education, New York City, NY
Project Name:History in the Classroom
Project Director:Jennifer S. Goodwin (212) 356-3802
Funding:$925,901
Number of Teachers Served:45
Number of School Districts Served:4
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

Developed in collaboration with Hunter College, this year-round professional development program for high school teachers also partners the school districts with the New York Public Library, the American Museum of Natural History, and the Museum of the City of New York. Eight graduate-level courses geared to the Grade 11 curriculum will be offered, along with workshops during the school year and summer institutes. Course work covers Colonial America and the Early Republic, Civil War and Reconstruction, the Gilded Age and Imperialism Through the Progressive Era, World War I through World War II, the Civil Rights Era, and Contemporary America. Summer institutes address U.S. Founding Documents, Leadership, and America in a Global Context.

Grantee Name:New York City Department of Education, New York, NY
Project Name:Becoming Historians: Using Primary Source and Founding Documents to Teach American History in the Elementary School
Project Director:Theresa R. Ruyter (212) 356-3812
Funding:$997,455
Number of Teachers Served:75
Number of School Districts Served:4
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

The primary goal of this program is to improve instruction in American history in a cross-section of elementary schools in four districts representing a rich diversity of cultures, languages, socioeconomic status, and academic achievement. Partners include New York University, the Schomberg Center for Research in Black History, the New York Public Library, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Historic Hudson Valley, and the Museum of the City of New York. Each year of the grant, a new cohort of 25 teachers will spend one school year in seminars and a summer institute studying American history content and pedagogy. Year 1 looks at how freedoms were incorporated into founding documents and interpreted in the Republic's early days. Year 2 focuses on ways that "citizenship" was shaped by the Constitution, the Civil War, slavery, and immigration. Year 3 explores how land, property, and territory were framed in the Constitution and informed westward expansion and industrialization.

Grantee Name:Community School District 7, New York City Department of Education, Region 9, New York, NY
Project Name:American Leaders
Project Director:Jennifer S. Goodwin (212) 356-7514
Funding:$904,180
Number of Teachers Served:90
Number of School Districts Served:4
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

This program brings a consortium of middle schools in neighboring districts together with Teachers College- Columbia University, the Museum of the City of New York, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, the Historic Houses Trust, and the South Street Seaport to provide seventh and eighth grade teachers with content-rich professional development in American history. Aimed at building instructional capacity and boosting student achievement in U.S. history, the program involves summer institutes, six full-day sessions devoted to development and implementation of lessons, project director residencies, workshops, and an annual colloquium. Summer institutes cover the topics of foundations and philosophy of a Nation, immigration and migration, and the changing nature of the American people. Among founding documents examined are the Mayflower Compact, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, the Federalist Papers, and the Constitution.

Grantee Name:District 29/Region 3, New York City Department of Education, Flushing, NY
Project Name:Teaching Democratic America: A Collaboration between Teachers and Historians
Project Director:Gus Hatzidimitriou (718) 281-3405
Funding:$985,215
Number of Teachers Served:
Number of School Districts Served:1
Number of Students Served:12,000

Ninety seventh, eighth, and eleventh grade teachers from 26 middle and high schools along with 15 social studies instructional supervisors are targeted participants in a professional development program designed and run in cooperation with the American Social History Project at the City University of New York (CUNY), and the Program in Social Studies of the Department of Secondary Education, Queens College, CUNY. Teaching American Democracy will provide four day-long retreats with historians, four day-long Retreats with history educators, a two-day leadership retreat, and district-wide staff development days, classroom observations, and school-site meetings to spread the resources of the project to all history teachers. Content covers the full chronological sweep of American history by focusing on broad themes of Defining and Refining Democracy and American Encounters. Year 1 focuses on the 18th and 19th Centuries; Year 2 on the 19th and 20th Centuries; and Year 3 on mid-19th century immigration, settling the West, and 20th century immigration.

Grantee Name:District 9 New York City Department of Education, Bronx, NY
Project Name:Uncovering America's Past
Project Director:Barbara W. Rosenberg (718) 741-7057
Funding:$990,614
Number of Teachers Served:40
Number of School Districts Served:1
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

Community School District 9 is partnering with the Museum of the City of New York, the New York Historical Society, and Colonial Williamsburg to engage American history teachers in the fourth, seventh and eighth grades in a professional development program including school-year learning sessions, summer institutes, study groups, and conferences. Participants will integrate hands-on experiences into the classroom through electronic field trips and other interactive classroom events. An Assistant Principal will join the ten teachers selected to participate in the Colonial Williamsburg summer institute each year. Content addresses the American colonies, the American Revolution, the rise of a new Nation, industrialization, and immigration. Scholars will integrate the history of New York and New York City into lectures, discussions, and lesson planning.

Grantee Name:Dutchess County Board of Cooperative Education, Poughkeepsie, NY
Project Name:America's Promise: 400 Years of Defining the American Dream
Project Director:Andrew J. Verdon (845) 486-4940
Funding:$999,522
Number of Teachers Served:150
Number of School Districts Served:40
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

Within the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area, 40 districts in three counties are partnering with Marist College, the Hudson River Valley Institute, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Karpeles Library, and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to improve the quality of American history instruction. The staff development program requires participants to create a plan mixing mandatory and optional activities aimed at acquiring content knowledge and building teaching skills that result in higher student achievement. Requirements include three seminars and development of learning experiences for students using primary sources, organized around historical inquiry, and including a rubric for assessing student historical reasoning and knowledge. Seminar topics include Henry Hudson and the New World: The Meeting of Many Cultures and Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and the Birth of Modern America. Other important focuses of the project are Presidential Leadership during Wartime: FDR, Lincoln, and Lyndon Johnson, and Coming to America: 400 Years of the Immigrant Experience.

Grantee Name:New York City Department of Education, Region 4, Community School District 24
Project Name:Teachers and Historians: A Partnership to Enrich Student Knowledge of U.S. History
Project Director:John-Paul Bianchi (718) 391-8307
Funding:$978,881
Number of Teachers Served:105
Number of School Districts Served:2
Number of Students Served:12,000

"Teachers and Historians" will engage middle and high school American history teachers in two districts in a professional development program run in conjunction with the American Social History Project at the City University of New York (CUNY) and the Program in Social Studies, Department of Secondary Education, Queens College, CUNY. The diverse urban schools served by the program have high numbers of students from low-income families, high rates of student failure in U.S. history, and significant numbers of teachers with little American history teaching experience. Activities include four day-long retreats with historians, four day-long retreats with history educators, a two-day leadership retreat, and the use of evaluation data designed to help improve instructional practice and student performance. Participants include 90 teachers in Grades 7, 8, and 11, and 15 social studies instructional supervisors; both groups will disseminate program insights and resources to all history teachers in their districts. Year 1 focuses on Defining and Refining Democracy and includes topics such as the American Revolution, the Constitution, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Year 2 continues the theme with topics such as the Rise of Industrial America, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, and the Civil Rights Movement. Year 3's theme of American Encounters will introduce teachers to topics such as mid 19th century Immigration, settling the West, and 20th century immigration.

Grantee Name:New York City Department of Education, Regional Instructional Center 10, New York, NY
Project Name:We the People
Project Director:Lainie Leber (917) 521-3678
Funding:$999,999
Number of Teachers Served:60
Number of School Districts Served:1
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

We the People is a professional development program in American history teaching aimed at fourth and fifth grade teachers. Two teachers will participate from each of 30 schools in a district in which the majority of students is at or below the poverty level, with many immigrants, refugees, and English Language Learners. The program teams Region 10 with the Teachers College and the Department of History at Cornell University, the New York Historical Society, and the Museum of the City of New York. Each teacher will participate in seven after-school seminars, four Saturday workshops, and a one-week summer institute. Traditional content themes include Native Americans, the Age of Exploration, colonial times, the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, westward expansion, industrial growth, urbanization, and government. Teachers will learn the words and ideals of the Founding Fathers and the legal and cultural underpinnings of the United States democracy.

Grantee Name:New York City Department of Education Region 2, Bronx, NY
Project Name:Telling America's Story for Small School American History Teachers
Project Director:Phillip Panaritis (718) 828-4638
Funding:$984,000
Number of Teachers Served:75
Number of School Districts Served:1
Number of Students Served:49,809

This professional development program aims to serve all 75 seventh, eighth and eleventh grade American history teachers in the district's 55 schools. In addition, some activities will be open to all 335 middle and high school teachers in Region 2's large schools. The district is located in an area of high-poverty in which large numbers of families are immigrants and large numbers of teachers are ill prepared to teach U.S. history. Partners with the LEA are the Museum of the City of New York, the New York Historical Society, Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum, Van Cortland House Museum, South Street Seaport Museum, and the African-American History Project. Program activities include annual two-week institutes, lectures by historians, mini-sessions for materials development, peer-led study groups, museum fairs, book clubs, use of the project website, and access to Columbia American History Online. Participants will also receive American history museum passes. Content themes include Democracy in the U.S., covering the American Revolution, the Constitution, the Federalist Papers, Jefferson and Jackson, the Civil War, and the American Presidency. A second theme is Freedom and Liberty in the U.S., covering the 17th and 18th Centuries. The third theme is the U.S. and Its Relationship to the World, ranging from the Monroe Doctrine to the Cold War.

Grantee Name:New York City Department of Education, Community School District 28, Region 3, Queens, NY
Project Name:American Citizen
Project Director:Constantine Hatzidimitriou (718) 281-3405
Funding:$983,980
Number of Teachers Served:134
Number of School Districts Served:1
Number of Students Served:No Information Available

This professional development collaboration partners the school district with the Gotham Center of the City University of New York, City Lore, New York's Center for Urban History and Culture, the Historic House Trust of New York City, the Henry Street Settlement, the Brooklyn Historical Society, and the U.S.S. Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. Aimed at improving student achievement in American history by increasing the skills and knowledge of their teachers, the program will do the following: (1) provide a professional staff development program focused on basic concepts of traditional American history; (2) disseminate the curriculum developed by the teachers; and (3) develop a sustainable model for staff education that can be used across the city and nation. In the first year, there will be a 40-hour summer institute for 50 educators who teach Grades 4 to 8. The second year will focus on a 60-hour Gotham Fellows program of intensive seminars for 24 teachers from Grades four, five, seven, and eight citywide. During the third year, the program will be disseminated system-wide and will fully prepare an additional 60 teachers. The program content spans the periods covered by traditional American history classes. A key focus will be the changing nature of citizenship in the Revolutionary and Civil War eras and during the 19th century influx of immigrants.


 
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Last Modified: 09/27/2005