State Charter School Facilities Incentive Grants

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2004 Grant Awards

Announcement

The U.S. Department of Education has announced the grantees under a new charter school facilities program, the State Charter School Facilities Incentive Grants program. The grantees, and the funding levels for the first two years of these five-year grants, are:

  • California School Finance Authority
    1st year $9,850,000
    2nd year $9,850,000
    3rd year $9,850,000
    4th year $9,850,000

  • Utah State Office of Education
    1st year $2,785,655
    2nd year $2,379,392
    3rd year $1,660,850
    4th year $1,279,579

  • Minnesota Department of Education
    1st year $5,000,000
    2nd year $4,000,000
    3rd year $2,214,410
    4th year $2,000,000

  • D.C. Public Schools
    1st year $1,057,220
    2nd year $722,922
    3rd year $1,057,220
    4th year $1,652,901

Under the State Charter School Facilities Incentive Grants program, the Department can award competitive grants of up to 5-years to states. States can use these funds to establish or enhance and administer per-pupil facilities aid programs for charter schools.

The State Charter School Facilities Incentive Grants program encourages states to develop and expand per-pupil facilities aid programs by matching non-Federal funds. The maximum Federal share of funds decreases each year (from 90 percent in the first year to 20 percent in year 5) and phases out entirely after 5 years. For a state to be eligible to receive a grant, the state's program must be specified in state law and provide annual funding on a per-pupil basis for charter school facilities. A per-pupil facilities aid program is one in which a state makes payments to charter schools. All, or a portion of all, of this funding is dedicted for facilities. The payments are based on a formula that takes into account the number of pupils in the charter school.

Unlike traditional public schools, charter schools do not typically have access to facilities through bonding or taxing authority. Charter schools often pay for facilities out of their general revenue, which could be better spent for educational purposes.


 
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Last Modified: 02/25/2011