Native Hawaiian Education

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2012 Grant Awards

Abstracts
FY 2012 Native Hawaiian Education Program

 

S362A120069
University of Hawaii

The Liko A’e Native Hawaiian Scholarship program has a two-fold mission:1) to support Native Hawaiian students’ entry into and completion of a program of higher education, and 2) to sustain the cycle of improvement among Native Hawaiians through education.  The goals for this project are to: 1) wrap around support services; 2) develop a leadership project that will connect scholars to the communities and professionals within their community and nation and 3) provide a community capacity-building opportunity to engage community leaders from all sectors and Liko A’e scholars to network and address the needs of Native Hawaiians in fields in which they are underemployed.  The project will provide approximately 600 scholarships to Native Hawaiian students while directly and indirectly reaching nearly 7,000 people through program goals and objectives.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120062
Living Life Source

The aim of the Kukui Malama Project is to increase the proportion of Native Hawaiian (NH) charter and immersion school students on Oahu and Kauai who are actively involved in healthcare career development and pursuing postsecondary healthcare training. Project goals are to: 1) increase academic performance levels of NH students on Oahu and Kauai especially at Hawaiian charter and immersion schools; 2) to improve NH students’ literacy skills in kindergarten through the sixth grade; 3) increase the number of NH students who graduate from high school; 4) identify, recruit and provide scholarship assistance to NH students interested in pursuing post-secondary healthcare training to reduce healthcare occupational shortages experienced by the Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems statewide.   The project will serve more than 200 NH charter and immersion and public school students at 2 charter schools and other public school sites in the Central and Westside districts of Kauai and 1 charter school site and other public school sites in Central Oahu.  
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120057 
Children’s Defense Fund

Hawaii KOA (Knowledge, Opportunity, Achievement)is a multi-layered project with services designed to prepare K – 12 students to enter the next level of education with the skills needed to succeed and to increase cultural awareness, knowledge and native language mastery among Native Hawaiian youth. Project services, aligned to address needs, gaps and weaknesses, include: a) Summer Learning; b) Academic Interventions; and c) Cultural Enrichment. Children’s Defense Fund will partner with local public school districts and public charter schools serving Native Hawaiian students to host three annual, eight-week, summer Freedom Schools, each serving up to 75 Native Hawaiian and low-performing students in grades K – 12 (Elementary Freedom School – Grades K – 5; Middle Freedom School – Grades 6 – 8; High Freedom School – Grades 9 – 12).  The project will serve 7,397 high needs and Native Hawaiian students enrolled in three partner school complexes (Konawaena, Kealakehe and Kohala) along the Kona and Kohala Coasts of Hawaii. Objective 1: Provide summer learning options for students, grades K – 12. Objective 2: Increase academic performance of Native Hawaiian students in Reading, Math and Science; and Objective 3: Improve student knowledge of Native Hawaiian culture and language.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120046 
University of Hawaii

The Ke Ola Mau Health Career Pathways Program is intended to increase the number of Native Hawaiians that enter and successfully complete a health career and is designed around a partnership between Na Pua No’eau, a University of Hawaii statewide Native Hawaiian education center providing educational enrichment to students in grades K-12 and their families on each island with professional schools and support services at the University of Hawaii campuses, and with Native Hawaiian health providers on each island. The statewide project would: 1) expose 2,000 high-risk Native Hawaiian students in grades K-12 to educational and career opportunities in selected health professions annually (Priority 1); 2) prepare 50 high school students statewide to enter college as a pre-major or major in a health field annually (Priority 6); 3) facilitate 40 Native Hawaiian college freshman and sophomore students to maintain good standing while preparing to major in a health field at  University of Hawaii at Hilo or University of Hawaii annually; 4) facilitate research, internships and/or community service projects annually for 80 Native Hawaiian students majoring in a health career; and 5) transition 80% of our project graduates directly into the Health Careers workforce, Health Education, or onto graduate or professional schools in the Health Fields.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120053
Hui Malama o Ke Kai

Hui Mālama O Ke Kai (HMK) is an after-school program offering research-driven services that incorporate cultural methodology into traditional educational enrichment models. The Wa’a Project programs’ curricula are place-centered, experiential, multi-year, ocean-based, and are steeped in Native Hawaiian values/culture in order to foster cultural identity and self-efficacy. Number of Participants to be Served will annually serve approximately eighty (80), primarily Native Hawaiian, “at-risk/at-promise" 5th and 6th grade HMK Keiki Program students and their families from Blanche Pope and Waimānalo Elementary schools, two of the lowest scoring most “high need” schools in the state, as well as dedicated HMK Keiki Program alumni and their families in the 7th to 12th grades through the HMK ‘Ōpio Leadership Program will holistically strengthen the personal development, health, and achievement factors of its participants and families.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120036
Partners in Development

Ka Pa‘alana Homeless Family Education Program’s goal is to better prepare for success the fragile population of at-risk Native Hawaiian families living on beaches and in public housing units through a provided continuum of care.  Ka Pa‘alana has two objectives:  increase family literacy and strengthen family dynamics and health of homeless Native Hawaiian families living on Leeward Coast beaches by continuing the “first contact” Mālama Mobile Outreach services and expanding its efforts at Kaupuni Park as well as extending its reach via a home visiting component;  and increase family literacy and strengthen family dynamics of at-risk/homeless Native Hawaiian families living in the Kaui‘okalani, Sea Winds, Waimaha and Sunflower public housing units by introducing a three-hour-a-day, two-day-a-week comprehensive family education program and incorporating extensive home visits. Over a period of three years, the program will serve 1,590 homeless/at-risk Native Hawaiians (820 children ages 0-5 and 770 adults), and will conduct 450 tent/home visits.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120005
Partners in Development

Project Tūtū and Me: Kāhelahela (Grandparent and Me: To spread out and forge roots) is a free mobile preschool that serves children age birth-five and theiradult caregiver.  The project will expand and continue this highly effective program for families living in the communities of Hilo and Laupāhoehoe, Hawai‘i. The goal and expected outcome of the project is that Native Hawaiian children in these communities will enter school ready to learn and succeed. The project’s objectives are: (1) to provide a quality early educational foundation for young children; (2) to provide education and support to their caregivers; (3) to enrich the relationship between caregiver and child; (4) to provide opportunities for professional development; (5) to partner with community organizations and agencies; (6) to develop educational materials and resources, and (7) to implement measures to assess, analyze and quantify the program’s impact. In three years’ time, the project will have increased the school readiness of 1,500 children.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120025 
Keiki O Ka Aina

Keiki O Ka Aina Family Learning Centers (KOKA) is an innovative partnership between KOKA, eight State of Hawaii Public Schools and the women’s correctional center, a bilingual preschool and three special education programs for children with special needs, and a high school with teen moms.  The project will incorporate Hawaiian language into all of our curricula and do pre/post evaluations to substantiate progress in the development of basic Hawaiian vocabulary.  Program objectives are: 1) Children demonstrate school readiness as measured by the Hawaii School Readiness Assessment (HSRA); 2) Children demonstrate improved literacy readiness, indicated by receptive vocabulary; 3) Children demonstrate improved literacy readiness, indicated by expressive vocabulary; 4) Children are screened for Developmental and Social/Emotional Delays and those with areas of concern are referred to their pediatrician for follow-up; 5) Children entering kindergarten are better prepared for learning as a result of our programs; 6) Children improve literacy as a result of having Department of Education (DOE) Teachers who demonstrate knowledge of establishing culturally competent learning environments and SAT-based instruction; 7) Children benefit from Parents/ Caregivers who are involved in their education; 8) Children benefit from Parents/ Caregivers with stronger connections to Hawaiian culture. This program will serve over 2800 children and parents and train over 50 teachers.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120068
University of Hawaii

Windward Community College (WCC), Pathway Out of Poverty program supports disadvantaged Native Hawaiian students to complete Nurse Aide (NA) training and 48 academically-promising NA graduates in Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) and Registered Nurse (RN) training over 3 years.  The curriculum emphasizes Native Hawaiian traditions and language, fosters cultural pride, and promotes healthy-living behaviors, while improving college enrollment rate, income-earning capacity, and long term socioeconomic stability of high-need students and their families. Project proposes to expand NA training by developing an online version of the didactic portions of the course and to enhance our “Prep to Nursing” course.  Also, a mechanism will be added for NAs transitioning to nursing to earn stipends through RN-supervised volunteer work at Lunalilo Home, a long-term care facility established by Hawaiian royalty to care for disabled and/or childless older adults.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120030 
University of Hawaii

 Ka Pilina: AIM Together is a project to improve math achievement resulting in increased high school (HS) graduation rates and college enrollment of all Native Hawaiian (NH) youth and those at-risk and with disabilities. The target priorities are: Priority (1) needs of at-risk children and youth and Priority (6-f) improving achievement and HS graduation rates.  Objectives include: (1) foster partnerships with math, cultural, disability, and educational experts; (2) identify, document, and adapt evidence based, face-to-face math teaching strategies using NH cultural context and create a blended learning BL intervention that includes intelligence tutoring system ITS; (3) provide PD to teachers; (4) provide training to college mentors; (5) pilot-test the BL intervention; (6) facilitate and monitor the teachers’ delivery of the BL intervention in school & during camps; (7) develop and implement math cultural activities and application to STEM during math camp & Math Community Days; (8) assess the effects of the BL intervention on students; (9) assess the effects of PD on teachers; (10) assess the effects of cultural math activities and STEM application activities on students; and (11) disseminate the findings and deliverables. The target schools are James Campbell High, Ilima Intermediate, Ewa Makai Middle, and Ke Kula 'o Samuel M. Kamakau Public Immersion School Kahuku Intermediate and High School, and five elementary schools (Hau’ula, Sunset, Kaaawa, Kahuku, Laie) and Over three years, the project will serve more than 3600 students.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120013
Partners in Development

Tech Together: Ka Ulu Ana Project activities will address the special needs of Native Hawaiian students by providing instruction through culturally-based innovative hands-on projects with Hawaiian language intertwined and incorporates experiential learning, group oriented projects, and exploratory methods focused on renewable and non-renewable energy.  TheProgram’s goals are: 1) To enable a minimum of 2,375 sixth grade students in 30 different schools to increase their base line knowledge in key STEM areas (by at least 40%) and favorable attitudes toward STEM study and careers; 2) To increase involvement for 7,125 family members and mentors of sixth grade students in developing at-home learning environments and activities that encourages community interest in learning and in building science projects that propel the student to success; and 3) To engage a minimum of 50 sixth grade teachers in professional development over three years to increase the number of teachers qualified to teach energy technology using culturally appropriate methods.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

S362A120040
University of Hawaii

The goal of the PALS Project (Program for Afterschool Literacy Support) is to: 1) increase school engagement;  2) improve reading proficiency;  3) increase the assets in children’s lives, and 4) increase graduation rates and college/workforce readiness.  Project goals will be accomplished through the provision of a series of after-school programs in a pipeline’ of elementary, middle, and high schools designed to leverage existing community resources and partnerships to provide children with place-based, culturally relevant learning experiences that shift across time/grade levels to account for the developmental and future oriented needs of the students.  Objectives include: 1) develop and implement placed-based learning opportunities across grade levels; 2) create a pipeline infrastructure to support students across critical transition grades; 3) create  community/career internships in high school; 4) provide ongoing professional development for PALS teachers; and,5) build and strengthen capacity for community involvement in education. PALS will reach and impact 432 students annually in 5 elementary schools, 3 middle schools and 1 high school (75% of the schools in the entire district) along the Wai’anae Coast.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120031
Kawaiahao Church Corporation

The Ulana O Kukui project will develop a bilingual Hawaiian-English curriculum for children of ages 3 to 9 and their parents, provide professional development to teachers, and involve parents in children’s bilingual language skill development.  The project objectives are: 1) 52 students will demonstrate increased levels of school readiness in beginning reading and literacy of the Hawaiian and English languages from age 3 through Grade 3; 2) teachers will receive professional development to improve their abilities to provide Hawaiian and English language instruction and to address the unique needs of Native Hawaiian students in the Hawaiian-English bilingual educational program, built around Montessori strategies of culturally-based education; and 3) 104 parents will demonstrate increased levels of Hawaiian and English language literacy in order to support their children’s bilingual development.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120014
Partners in Development

Na Pono Ka Pilina O’hana seeks to expand its four-year-old preschool classroom from two half days to five full days a week.  The project will incorporate the four-component program of the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL) emphasizing the Family Child Interactive Learning model: (1) Childhood Education, (2) Parent Education, (3) Parent and Children Time and Adult Education.   The program’s home site is Blanche Pope Elementary school located in the heart of Waimanalo’s Hawaiian Homestead.  Na Pono Ka Pilina objectives are to serve 90 four-year olds from 475 families or 2,550 individuals; increasing Kindergarten readiness; increasing literacy and technology skills of adults; improving parenting skills; increasing quality of parent/child interactions and incorporating the Na Honua Mauli Ola guidelines.  
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120019
Partners in Development

Project Pili A Pa’a will increase the instructional capacity of teachers to build capacity via teacher leadership, and to build student confidence in their ability to excel in school.  Six cycles of teachers will engage in intensive work to improve teaching pedagogy and will be comprised of staff from core content areas to develop curriculum and examine teaching practices that are culturally responsive to Native Hawaiian learners.  The measurable objective will include increased percentages in student achievement, changes in student/teacher attitudes toward teaching/learning, and improved level of college /career readiness.  Eighty-eight teachers and 486 students of Native Hawaiian descent within three North Hawai’i schools will be impacted.
To view the 2012 application, click here.

 

S362A120070 
Educational Services Hawaii

The Journey to Success Project seeks to provide mentoring services for 50 to 60 Native Hawaiian youth who are no longer represented by an adult advocate or surrogate parent, to enable the youth to: (1) earn sufficient credits during the academic year to graduate with a high school diploma or certificate of completion; (2) earn sufficient credits during the academic year to be promoted to the next higher level and avoid retention; (3) improve their academic performance; or (4) improve their post-high school employment opportunities. The Project’s mentors will work with a Native Hawaiian youth and his or her foster family, over an extended period of time, and regularly checks on the educational progress of the youth. The mentor intervenes, or connects, in a timely manner to re-establish and maintain the youth’s connection to school and learning if the youth is disengaged from school. The mentor’s message to the youth, is: you can succeed; complete the work; attend each class; be on time; express your frustration constructively; and stay in and complete school.
To view the 2012 application, click here

 

S362A120007 
Lanai Culture & Heritage Center

E ‘Ike Hou iā Lana‘i (Embracing Lāna‘i’s History Through Language and Literacy) is an initiative that engages the community and school in a collaborative effort to improve literacy and academic outcomes.  The objectives of the community-school partnership of Lāna‘i Culture & Heritage Center (Lāna‘i CHC) and the Lāna‘i High and Elementary School (LHES) are as follows: (1) to utilize cultural curricula to improve academic outcomes for students in LHES; (2) to enhance early childhood and young adults literacy through the combined study of the Hawaiian language and English, cultural and natural history and outreach programs; and (3) to improve learning outcomes of young adults and graduation rates of Hawaiian students. The proposed project “E ‘Ike Hou iā Lāna‘i” (Embracing Lānai‘i’s History Through Language and Literacy) will serve 542 students in Lāna‘i High & Elementary School as well as the 2800 residents from the Lāna‘i community utilizing the Lāna‘i CHC.
To view the 2012 application, click here.


 
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Last Modified: 12/03/2012