Magnet Schools Assistance

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Texas 2010 Grant Abstracts

Grantee Name:

Houston Independent School District

Project Name:

Magnet Schools Assistance Program

Project Director:

Lupita Hinojosa

Telephone:

(713) 556-6788

Email:

lhinojos@houstonisd.org

Number of Schools Served:

5

Number of Students Served:

2,833

Year 1 Funding:

$3,736,835

Total (3-Year) Funding:

$11,432,650

Program Description:
The grant will fund three programs at the elementary level, one at the middle school level, and one at the high school level.

Two whole-school Montessori magnets will be funded from the grant—one on the northeast side of Houston at Garden Oaks Elementary School and one on the southeast side of the city at Dodson Elementary School. The Montessori program at Garden Oaks will include an environmental science theme. The funds will also be used for a health science magnet at Whidby Elementary, which is located near the Texas Medical Center and the DeBakey High School for Health Professions.

At the secondary level, Fondren Middle School will become an International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) magnet school and Jones High School will become a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) magnet with an emphasis on green renewable energy and technology.

Program Goals:
The goal of the program is to enhance the educational programs at five schools and, by way of demonstrating “new horizons” for those schools, to strengthen the HISD magnet schools program generally. The five exemplary programs in this proposal will be beacons for the district and community, leading the way for all magnet programs. With the support of MSAP funding we will create exemplary magnet school programs that demonstrate best practices consistent with MSAP purposes.

The three main goals are promoting desegregation/school choice, building capacity of schools and staff, and improving academic achievement of students.

Schools Served and Number of Students Served:
Dodson Elementary—Montessori (548 students)
Garden Oaks Elementary—Montessori & Environmental Science (599 students)
Whidby Elementary—Leadership & Health Science (480 students)
Fondren Middle School—Leadership & IB MYP (610 students)
Jones High School—Leadership & S.T.E.M (596 students)

Grantee Name:

The Rhodes School

Project Name:

Magnet Schools Assistance Program

Project Director:

Michelle Bonton

Telephone:

(281) 224-5873

Email:

mlbonton@yahoo.com

Number of Schools Served:

1

Number of Students Served:

300

Year 1 Funding:

$1,321,003

Total (3-Year) Funding:

N/A

The purpose of The Rhodes School Magnet School Project is to expand educational choice and provide increased opportunities for students from different ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds to interact with each other. The goal will be accomplished through a fine art magnet charter school which offers art, dance, drama, and classical music as part of the core curriculum. We will utilize federal, state, and private resources to implement the program and establish partnerships with other arts organizations as well. Both process and outcomes evaluation data are important in meeting the needs of significant constituencies and supporting later efforts to replicate successful models. Evaluation will entail reviewing, describing, and assessing program effectiveness based on the following program goals:

  • To establish a new Magnet School that will promote desegregation.
  • To provide public school choice to parents of students who attend low performing schools and reduce minority group isolation in k-5 schools with substantial proportions of minority students.
  • To improve student achievement, across the curriculum, including in math, science, reading, social studies, art, theater, dance and music.
  • To provide innovative theme-based curricula that will promote equity and diversity and increase interaction among students of different backgrounds (e.g. social, economic, ethnic, racial).
  • To improve the capacity to continue offering a magnet school program after the Federal funding has ended.
Grantee Name:

Corpus Christi Independent School District

Project Name:

K-12 Metropolitan Design (MET) project

Project Director:

Janis Jordan

Telephone:

(361) 886-9115

Email:

jmjordan@ccisd.us

Number of Schools Served:

2

Number of Students Served:

N/A

Year 1 Funding:

$2,070,030

Total (3-Year) Funding:

$6,425,681

The Corpus Christi Independent School District (CCISD) will create a K-12 innovative arts magnet program on two inner city campuses. The creation of the K-12 Metropolitan Design (MET) project for Corpus Christi is an exciting new K-12 continuum that strengthens and expands the fine arts through creativity, innovation, and design. This new academic choice for CCISD families combines both creativity and critical thinking as essential 21st century skills with a strong science and math focus through the arts. Creativity expert, Sir Ken Robinson states that creativity is the crucial 21st century skill America needs to solve today's pressing problems. This robust arts and humanities focus ensures students attain college and career-readiness skills and attributes. The guiding constructs of this program are based on sound research using high-yield instructional strategies, differentiation, the leveraging of technology, and personalized instruction. Assessment will be immediate, ongoing, individually-driven, and authentic. Professional development for teachers will be job-embedded, individualized, and reflective to ensure dynamic improved learning. The MET magnet program will be world-class. It will invigorate students, excite the community, and spark high interest in parents searching for value-added curriculum and instruction for their children.

Wynn Seale Middle School and Miller High School are struggling academically. Both schools continue to drop in enrollment as affluent families move to suburban areas of the city, perpetuating a tough image for these two schools. District funding beyond the educational basics for these schools is not available. This means that they will continue to flounder without some type of intervention. CCISD proposes to capitalize on the highly successful Chula Vista Academy of Fine Arts program by expanding and enhancing it. The CCISD magnet project combines the operations of three schools: Chula Vista Academy of Fine Arts, Wynn Seale Middle School, and Miller High School into two campuses to form the Corpus Christi Metropolitan Magnet Schools of Design. The Wynn Seale campus will become the Metropolitan Elementary Magnet School of Design (Metro E) and Miller High School will house the Metropolitan Preparatory Magnet School of Design (Metro Prep). With this Metropolitan Design magnet project Wynn Seale will merge with Chula Vista to become a K-6 campus and Miller High School will sequentially scaffold a more sophisticated program of study from 7th grade as the Metropolitan Design strand cycles though the 12th grade. The reconfiguration of the schools into K-6 and 7-12 smaller learning communities will mean students deal with only one transition as they advance from elementary to secondary. Metro E and Metro Prep will transform two inner-city schools into “hip” urbane downtown schools with sophistication and polish.

The CCISD Board voted to implement this K-12 articulated magnet thematic strand by securing a U.S. Department of Education MSAP grant. Furthermore, CCISD assures the six statutory purposes of the Magnet Schools Assistance Program and the Elementary and Secondary Education Act are strongly embedded in this thematic strand. The Corpus Christi Metropolitan Schools of Design engage rigorous student educational curricula with the essential development of creativity, innovation, and design to provide an integrated program sought by parents and students alike. This program proposes a well-rounded, transformational design for revitalizing and invigorating these campuses.

Grantee Name:

Galveston Independent School District

Project Name:

Magnet Schools Assistance Program

Project Director:

Annette Scott

Telephone:

(409)766-5122

Email:

annette_scott@gisd.org

Number of Schools Served:

5

Number of Students Served:

2,500

Year 1 Funding:

$3,950,000

Total (3-Year) Funding:

$11,432,650

Galveston Independent School District (GISD) will establish four new magnet schools and substantially revise one magnet school. The catastrophic effects of Hurricane Ike have resulted in financial challenges for the district. GISD is unable to proceed with this project without grant funding.

The goals of the GISD Magnet program are to 1: Eliminate, reduce, or prevent minority group isolation. 2: Develop and design innovative educational practices promoting diversity and increasing choices 3: Build the capacity to continue operating at a high performance level after grant funding ends. 4: Provide the opportunity to meet challenging State academic content and achievement standards. 5: Substantially strengthen the students' knowledge of academic subjects and their attainment of tangible and marketable skills. 6: Provide all students in the magnet schools equitable access to high quality education resulting in academic success and achievement.

These goals will be accomplished through a District School of Choice Model, with each school implementing different themes. Central Middle School will integrate a Media Arts and Technology into their curriculum. Parker Elementary School will implement an International Studies curriculum including the study of the foreign languages of German, French, Chinese, and Spanish. Oppe Elementary School will focus on Coastal Studies. Morgan Elementary School's theme will be Science and Engineering. Early Childhood University will develop a culture of Academic Excellence and Project Based Learning.

Grantee Name:

Ector County Independent School District

Project Name:

Magnet Schools Assistance Program

Project Director:

Wendy Hines

Telephone:

(432) 334-7107

Email:

Wendy.Hines@ectorcountyisd.org

Number of Schools Served:

3

Number of Students Served:

2,700

Year 1 Funding:

$2,267,860

Total (3-Year) Funding:

$6,831,387

Creating New Magnet Schools for Meaningful Desegregation

The Ector County Independent School District (ECISD) located in Odessa, Texas, is significantly revising themes at three existing magnet schools. ECISD did not receive Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) support during the last funding cycle. The revised magnet themes are designed to substantially reduce racial isolation in a community with a growing minority population while significantly raising student achievement so that each school meets all requirements of the Reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).

The unique magnet programs will voluntarily draw students who currently live in the district's predominantly white neighborhoods. They will also increase the academic growth rate in the percentage of students who achieve the state's definition of academic proficiency.

The Zavala Elementary School will change its magnet theme from the current Micro-Society theme to Children's Engineering. Cameron Elementary School will significantly revise its Dual Language program to become an International Studies magnet school. Ector Jr. High will significantly revise its current Fine Arts magnet program and will offer the Middle Years International Baccalaureate Program and Project Lead the Way Engineering.

All courses of study will be tailored to provide students discipline, skills, and challenging academic standards, emphasizing creativity and flexibility. In addition to the unique program of studies, students will also be provided instruction using proven “research-based” teaching approaches to address individual learning styles. Approximately 2,700 students will be directly impacted through the MSAP Grant in ECISD.


 
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Last Modified: 12/21/2010