Magnet Schools Assistance

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Connecticut 2010 Grant Abstracts

Grantee Name:

New Haven Public Schools

Project Name:

Magnet Schools Assistance Program

Project Director:

Robert Canelli

Telephone:

(203) 946-5696

Email:

robert.canelli@new-haven.k12.ct.us

Number of Schools Served:

4

Number of Students Served:

1,492

Year 1 Funding:

$3,017,801

Total (3-Year) Funding:

$9,832,520

New Haven will establish four new magnet schools that will draw students from nearby suburban communities. To be successful as in the past, New Haven will rely on the support of the Magnet Schools Assistance Program to achieve its project goals. New curriculum must be developed and aligned with state standards, teachers must be trained, supplies and equipment must be purchased and integrated into the new curricula and parents must be informed about the new programs. Each school's theme must be integrated into lessons, and part-time tutors will supply extra support in Literacy.

Names of magnet schools, special curricular programs, and number of students who will participate (2010-11): Rogers-Brennan: Communication and Media (350 Students); Conte-West Hills: Exploration and Innovation (658 Students); Hyde High School: Health Science and Sports Medicine (220 Students); The Science and Engineering University Magnet School: Science and Engineering (264 Students).

A brief description of major objectives/performance measures:

Objective 1: Minority group isolation will be reduced at 4 minority group isolated magnet schools; minority group isolation will be reduced by specific percentage points each year. Each year, applicant pool for each magnet school will reflect racial and ethnic compositions that in relation to the total school enrollments will reduce minority group isolation. Each year, each magnet school will receive at least 100 applications. Each year, class minority: non-minority ratios will not deviate from grade ratios by more than 15%.

Objective 2: All students will receive instruction that includes their school's systemic reforms and magnet themes in units and courses aligned with State standards. Each year, magnet schools will complete school improvement plans with objectives and activities that support systemic reforms; each year, units reflecting systemic reforms will be developed, used with students for a specific number of minutes per week.

Objective 3: All students in each magnet school program will receive magnet theme instruction. Each year, magnet theme related units will be developed, used with students for a specific number of minutes per week and published.

Objective 4: Each year, for each magnet school, the proportion of students in each NCLB subgroup will meet or exceed the adequate yearly progress standards for their grades. Magnet schools will show improvement in reading, mathematics and writing each year for all students and subgroups; all magnet schools will attain NCLB Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for all students and subgroups each year. By end of project period, magnet school students will develop mastery of the magnet curriculum.

Objective 5: Provide professional development for magnet school teachers related to systemic reforms and magnet theme development and implementation. Each year, magnet school teachers will receive at least 30 hours of PD related to systemic reforms and 30 hours of PD related to magnet theme.

Objective 6: There will be an increase in parent participation at each magnet school.

Grantee Name:

Capitol Region Education Council

Project Name:

The Hartford and CREC Consortium

Project Director:

Denise Gallucci

Telephone:

(860) 524-4015

Email:

dgallucci@crec.org

Number of Schools Served:

8

Number of Students Served:

2,506

Year 1 Funding:

$3,729,379

Total (3-Year) Funding:

$11,469,544

Objective 1: Minority group isolation will be reduced at 8 minority group isolated magnet schools; minority group isolation will be reduced by specific percentage points each year (1.1 – 1.8); Each year, applicant pool for each magnet school will reflect racial and ethnic compositions that in relation to the total school enrollments will reduce minority group isolation (1.9); Each year, each magnet school will receive at least 100 applications (1.10); Each year, class minority:non-minority ratios will not deviate from grade ratios by more than 15% (1.11).

Objective 2: All students will receive instruction that includes their school's systemic reforms and magnet themes in units and courses aligned with State standards. Each year, magnet schools will complete school improvement plans with objectives and activities that support systemic reforms (2.1); Each year, units reflecting systemic reforms will be developed, used with students for a specific number of minutes per week (2.2).

Objective 3: All students in each magnet school program will receive magnet theme instruction. Each year, magnet theme related units will be developed, used with students for a specific number of minutes per week and published (3.1, 3.2).

Objective 4: Each year, for each magnet school, the proportion of students in each NCLB subgroup will meet or exceed the adequate yearly progress standards for their grades. Magnet schools will show improvement in reading, mathematics and writing each year for all students and subgroups (4.1 – 4.3); all magnet schools will attain NCLB Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for all students and subgroups each year (4.4). By end of project period, magnet school students will develop mastery of the magnet curriculum (4.5).

Objective 5: Provide professional development for magnet school teachers related to systemic reforms and magnet theme development and implementation. Each year, magnet school teachers will receive at least 30 hours of PD related to systemic reforms and 30 hours of PD related to magnet theme (5.1, 5.2).

Objective 6: There will be an increase in parent participation at each magnet school (6.1).

Names of magnet schools, special curricular programs, and number of students who will participate (2010-11): Mary M. Hooker:Environmental Sciences (304 students); Annie Fisher STEM: Engineering and Math (383 students); Hartford Magnet Middle/High School: Early College (700 students); Pathways to Technology: Technology/Problem-Based Learning (385 students); CREC Museum Academy: Museum Studies (226 students in yr.2); CREC Aerospace, Engineering, Biomedical, and Advanced Mathematics Academy: Aerospace and Engineering (257 students); CREC Medical Professions and Teacher Preparation Magnet School: Health Care/Medical Studies and Teacher Preparation (251 students); Connecticut River Academy: Environmental Studies (180 students).

Grantee Name:

Area Cooperative Educational Services

Project Name:

Magnet Schools Assistance Program

Project Director:

Sharyn Esdaile

Telephone:

(203) 498-6842

Email:

shayesd@aol.com

Number of Schools Served:

2

Number of Students Served:

1,350

Year 1 Funding:

$473,767

Total (3-Year) Funding:

$1,177,559

This program will enhance the capacity of two Area Cooperative Educational Services (ACES) magnet schools, which serve over 1,350 students, to recruit diverse students from isolated, low-performing districts and schools in Connecticut and educate them to high levels of mastery. ACES Thomas Edison Middle School, or TEMS, is a science, math, and technology magnet school that serves 752 grade 6-8 students. ACES Wintergreen Interdistrict Magnet School, or WIMS, is a K-8 school that provides a comprehensive liberal arts education and an extended school day and year for 605 students.

Through this project, these two magnet schools will implement science and hands-on, inquiry-based learning activities that will also strengthen their instructional programs in reading/language arts, social studies, and math. Teachers will collaborate in the context of Professional Learning Communities to align planning and instruction and better respond to student needs. These complementary components will lead to academic growth for all students.

Partners and collaborators who will support the work of this project include the Connecticut Science Center, the Peabody Museum at Yale, the Eli Whitney Museum, Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk, Mystic Seaport Museum, and Hammonasset Beach State Park. These are resource-rich institutions that will provide professional development for educators and exploration and field study opportunities for WIMS and TEMS students and their families.

The goal of this project is to use science and inquiry to strengthen the language arts, social studies, math, and science curricula and instruction and bolster achievement among TEMS and WIMS students. Project objectives will demonstrate progress toward achievement of MSAP performance measures and are:

1. To maintain diverse student enrollments at TEMS and WIMS across the three-year grant period that reduces racial and minority group isolation in sending schools and provides opportunities for students to learn with diverse peers (Performance measure a);

2. To increase the percentage of students from all racial and ethnic groups who meet or exceed state annual progress standards in reading and language arts by 3% each year as measured by student test scores on Connecticut's annual Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) exam (Performance measure b);

3. To increase the percentage of students from all racial and ethnic groups who meet or exceed state annual progress standards in math and science by 3% each year as measured by student test scores on Connecticut's annual Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) exam (Performance measure c);

4. To administer TEMS and WIMS at funding levels that are reasonable given the nature of the magnet school programs and are comparable to Connecticut's annual cost-per-student expenditures in public schools each project year (Performance measure d);

5. To strengthen and maintain achievement-supporting Professional Learning Communities at TEMS and WIMS by the end of MSAP project year 1 and continuing throughout the grant period;

6. To increase awareness of magnet schools' crucial role in educational equity to assure continued operation of TEMS and WIMS as magnet schools after the MSAP grant period (Performance measure e); and

7. TEMS and WIMS students will meet State standards and NCLB Adequate Yearly Progress standards, both overall and among racial and socioeconomic student sub-groups, three years after federal funding ends (Performance measure f).


 
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Last Modified: 12/21/2010