Investing in Innovation Fund (i3)

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District of Columbia 2010 Validation Grant Abstracts


Grantee:

Council for Opportunity in Education

PR Award Number:

U396B100289

Project Title:

Using Data to Inform College Access Programming in the 21st Century High School (Using DICAP)

Project Director:

Maureen Hoyler
202-347-7430

Amount of Award:

$20,264,447

Length of Award:

5 years

Absolute Priority:

AP2: Use of Data

List of Partners (with states for each):

School Districts
The Academy at Shawnee, Fern Creek, and Moore High Schools in Louisville (KY)
Central Tech, East and Strong Vincent High Schools (PA)
Erie City School District (PA)
Jefferson County School District (KY)

Universities and Other Partners
Gannon University (PA)
Greater Erie Community Action Agency (PA)
Kentucky State University, (KY)
Northwest Tri-County Intermediate Unit (PA)
University of Louisville (KY)

Project Website:

TBD

Description of Project:

Using Data to Inform College Access Programming in the 21st Century High School (Using DICAP) combines tiered school-level and student-level interventions previously undertaken by the Council for Opportunity in Education (COE). Using DICAP aims to positively impact college enrollment and success, as well as student achievement, student growth and related factors, in six schools with large numbers and percentages of high-needs students by using targeted and whole-school interventions that include data collection, data analysis and the dissemination of analysis. A secondary project goal is to validate a new model for Federal Talent Search programs that will enable them to meet new requirements for providing sufficient academic support to help students succeed in rigorous secondary school curricula. (Talent Search is a federally funded college access program that annually serves 370,000 low-income middle and high school students in nearly 500 programs in all 50 states.)

In the Using DICAP model, at least 25 percent of students enrolled in each grade level at each school receive targeted college access services that start the summer before high school enrollment and continue through graduation. To a large extent, services are delivered through learning communities of students in the same grade, enrolled – to the extent feasible –in the same courses. Students are jointly selected for participation based on Talent Search eligibility criteria by school and college access program personnel. Students in learning communities receive a mix of services already provided by Talent Search but with more frequency and intensity.

From the inception of its 2006 GE Foundation pilot, Using DICAP was intended to be scaled. By introducing a model to assist Talent Search programs to meet changes required by the Higher Education Opportunity Amendments of 2008, the project could be replicated in any of the 470 Talent Search programs in all 50 states and the territories. Using DICAP can also be scaled in other federal, state and privately funded college access programs including GEAR UP and Upward Bound.

Using DICAP is an exceptional approach, combining tiered school-level and student-level interventions to allow college access programs and school districts to make informed decisions about (1) student course taking, (2) grade-level achievement goals, (3) academic support to meet grade-level achievement goals, (4) programming for transitioning from middle to high school, (5) activities encouraging students to aspire to STEM majors and careers, (6) engaging parents in college-going activities and (7) engaging community leaders in increasing college-going and success.

Description of Evaluation:

Using DICAP outcomes are evaluated using a rigorous quasi-experimental design to study student and school-wide impacts. Tier 1, which comprises a matched-comparison group and growth modeling, is conducted with individual student-level data to determine whether participation increases student academic performance, rigorous course taking patterns and retention and promotion rates, and rates of postsecondary enrollment and degree attainment. Evaluators will also examine whether participation benefits different student groups in different ways. Tier 2, a comparative short interrupted time-series, will examine school-level impacts, including overall college enrollment and success rates and staff use of data and techniques that integrate student data.

Project Evaluator:

Mario Yepes-Baraya
609-734-5323

Organization:

Educational Testing Service


Grantee:

Smithsonian Institution

PR Award Number:

U396B100097

Project Title:

The LASER Model: A Systemic and Sustainable Approach for Achieving High Standards in Science Education

Project Director:

Sally Goetz Shuler
202-633-2966

Amount of Award:

$25,536,561

Length of Award:

5 years

Absolute Priority:

AP3: High Standards and High-Quality Assessments

List of Partners (with states for each):

School District
Houston Independent School District (TX)

Other
Indiana Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (I-STEM)
Resource Network of Purdue University (IN)
North Carolina Science, Mathematics, and Technology
  Education Center (NC)

Project Website:

TBD

Description of Project:

Developed by the National Science Resources Center (NSRC), a division of the Smithsonian Institution, the Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform (LASER) model is a coherent set of strategies designed to help district and school-based leaders create and sustain the infrastructures that are required to support and promote high-quality, inquiry-oriented science instruction in our nation's K-8 classrooms. The LASER model has already been successfully implemented in a number of states, impacting tens of thousands of teachers and hundreds of thousands of students. Funding will be used to support validation of the LASER model in Indiana, North Carolina and Texas by (a) stress-testing the strategies in high-poverty urban and rural schools, (b) gaining a better understanding of the factors at every level of the system that will be critical to the success of subsequent national scale-up, and (c) refining existing research instruments and replication protocols. The project will serve 75,000 rural and urban students in grades 1-8.

Description of Evaluation:

Program evaluation will entail a large-scale, well-designed randomized controlled trial involving approximately 100 schools in three states. This will be complemented by a set of some 30 case studies of selected phase 1 and phase 2 schools representing high and low levels of implementation, respectively.

Project Evaluator:

Donald M. "Chip" Morrison
901-678-5368

Organization:

The University of Memphis, Center for Research and Educational Policy (CREP)


 
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Last Modified: 05/01/2012