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New York 2010 Development Grant Abstracts


Grantee:

New York City Department of Education

PR Award Number:

U396C100941

Project Title:

New York City Department of Education — School of One

Project Director:

Tres Watson
212-374-0558

Amount of Award:

$4,999,560

Length of Award:

4 years

Absolute Priority:

AP2: Use of Data

List of Partners (with states for each):

There are no partners.

Project Website:

www.schoolofone.org

Description of Project:

Ensuring that students graduate from high school ready for college, meeting the individual needs of students with disabilities and English language learners, and doing this in a way that is scalable across urban and rural communities requires a fundamental redesign of the way instruction is delivered to students and data are used in classrooms. In the traditional school model, instruction is largely provided through a single modality—one teacher delivering instruction to 25-30 students at one time. In the New York City Department of Education's School of One, students receive instruction through multiple modalities, and delivery is organized through an adaptive, highly intelligent learning platform so that students can learn in ways that are personalized to their academic needs, interests and ways of learning.

In the 2012-13 school year, School of One will expand to four additional school sites serving approximately 3,000 students in grades 6-8. The 2012-13 expansion will continue to use School of One's non-enterprise solution, which may have the capacity to support only as many as 10 schools at one time. However, School of One will use a portion of its i3 grant funds to develop an enterprise solution that can be scaled to an exponential number of schools and students, both in New York City and beyond.

By fall 2014, School of One expects to expand nearly five times in size to serve 35 middle schools across New York City, using the first version of its enterprise platform. During this time frame, funding for enterprise development and the further expansion of School of One will come from a mix of philanthropic and public sources (and some in-kind support). Once the enterprise solution is built, School of One will begin migrating to a fee-for-service model that can accommodate the needs of schools within and outside of New York City interested in adopting School of One. Prior to scaling up outside of New York City, School of One will seek alternative governance models that will enable School of One to expand to support districts and cities outside of New York.

Description of Evaluation:

Evaluators will use a cluster randomized controlled trial, with eight schools divided evenly into treatment and control groups. The main research question is whether the program has a large impact on students' mathematics achievement growth. The evaluation includes the following elements:

  • Collection of administrative data and a baseline survey to measure non-test outcomes.
  • Collection of periodic test and survey data to reassess academic behaviors and attitudes as well as experiences with the program for the treatment students.
  • Focus groups.
  • Data collection on key elements of program implementation to provide detail on program functioning and the factors that mediate its impact.
Project Evaluator:

Jonah Rockoff and Leigh Linden
212-854-9799

Organization:

Columbia University


Grantee:

New York City Department of Education, District 75

PR Award Number:

U396C100275

Project Title:

Everyday Arts for Special Education

Project Director:

Kathy London
212-802-1585

Amount of Award:

$4,633,397

Length of Award:

5 years

Absolute Priority:

AP1: Effective Teachers and Principals

List of Partners (with states for each):

Manhattan New Music Project (NY)

Project Website:

http://www.mnmp.org/arts/research/ease/

Description of Project:

District 75 serves 23,000 students with special needs in New York City, with more than 4,000 teachers in 56 schools. In partnership with the Manhattan New Music Project (MNMP), the district is launching Everyday Arts for Special Education (EASE), a 5-year initiative to increase the effectiveness of teachers in special education settings. EASE is a professional development program designed to improve student achievement in the areas of communication; socialization; academic learning; and arts proficiency through integrated, arts-based approaches.

Through a series of training workshops and extensive in-school support, participating teachers in 10 treatment schools will learn skills and strategies across multiple arts disciplines (music, dance, visual arts and theater) in order to integrate the arts into their classroom instruction. In addition, EASE training will be offered to other teachers within District 75 through a districtwide professional development program, to special education teachers and college students through Summer Seminar workshops, and to special education administrators nationwide through Administrators' Workshops. Through treatment schools and other training efforts, EASE will serve 40,795 students.

In its professional development partnership with MNMP's Communication and Socialization through the Arts, District 75 has found evidence that integrated arts instruction can help address core communication and socialization deficits in students on the autism spectrum. The district expects to see similar results when similar instruction is differentiated for a range of special-needs populations. For most students with disabilities, communication and socialization are major curriculum areas, and are represented in each student's Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals; in this sense, improvement in these areas constitutes improved student achievement in and of itself. Moreover, lack of mastery in these areas can have a negative effect on all areas of learning. Improving communication and socialization skills through targeted arts activities provides opportunities for teaching other curricula. Core academic areas can be taught in engaging ways through arts integration, particularly for students who may not easily learn through more traditional instruction.

Through intensive professional development, EASE seeks to increase participating teachers' ability to effectively apply integrated, multidisciplinary, arts-based strategies for students with special needs. EASE specifically targets improvements in students' communication and socialization skills, and the district expects these improvements to lead to academic gains in other content areas. A rise in students' arts proficiency is also anticipated.

Description of Evaluation:

The evaluation will employ a quasi-experimental design, with an additional systematic, qualitative component. Research questions include the following: (1) Does the program increase teachers' ability to effectively apply multidisciplinary arts-based strategies for students with special needs? (2) Does the program improve students' communication and socialization skills through multidisciplinary arts activities? (3) Does the program improve students' arts proficiency through multidisciplinary arts activities? (4) Does the program improve students' academic proficiency through multidisciplinary arts activities? (5) Are there different effects among different sample populations, including students on the autism spectrum, students with cognitive disabilities, students with emotional disturbance, and students with multiple disabilities?

Project Evaluator:

Dr. Rob Horowitz
212-781-3730

Organization:

Center for Arts Education Research at Teachers College, Columbia University


Grantee:

The Studio in a School Association, Inc.

PR Award Number:

U396C100448

Project Title:

Arts Achieve: Impacting Student Success in the Arts

Project Director:

Thomas Cahill
212-765-5900

Amount of Award:

$4,372,798

Length of Award:

5 years

Absolute Priority:

AP3: High Standards and High-Quality Assessments

List of Partners (with states for each):

92nd Street Y/Harkness Dance Center (NY)
ArtsConnection, Inc. (NY)
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum,
Smithsonian Institution (NY)
Dance Educational Laboratory (NY)
New York City Department of Education (NY)
Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall (NY)

Project Website:

TBD

Description of Project:

The Studio in a School Association, Inc., a local education agency and four other organizations are partnering to implement Arts Achieve: Impacting Student Success in the Arts. This program will accomplish the following:

  • Improve student achievement in the arts through the development and implementation of balanced arts assessments that are aligned with fifth grade, eighth grade, and high school academic achievement standards.
  • Translate the standards and information from assessments into classroom practices that support improved arts achievement for all students.
  • Promote innovations in student and teacher access to content and assessment feedback
    through the use of technology.

Arts Achieve will result in the creation of online, open access educational resources that have been validated and informed by the results of the assessments and made available nationwide. This grant will also enable the introduction of technology into arts classroom practice to facilitate art creation, documentation, research, feedback, reflection, collaboration, and file sharing; both within and beyond the schools (student-to-student, student-to-teacher, student-to-parent, and student- and teacher-to-partnering arts institution). Arts Achieve puts formative and summative assessment to work to empower high-needs students to reflect, direct, and enhance their experience and performance in the arts and to connect to resources that they could not otherwise access. The project will also produce objective measures through which the partners can assess significant correlations of arts achievement to improved English language arts performance. Arts Achieve will involve 14,400 high-needs students during the term of the grant, and it has the potential to impact the more than 1.1 million children who attend New York City Department of Education schools. The research for and evaluation of this project will be conducted by Metis Associates.

Description of Evaluation:

Using random assignment, half of the selected schools will be assigned as treatment and half as control schools. Formative evaluation questions will focus on successful implementation of the project and dissemination of the resulting products. Summative questions will focus on the extent to which Arts Achieve produces assessments aligned with arts standards, the impact of the initiative on arts teachers’ instruction and their integration of technology into the classroom, and the impact of the project on student academic performance. Evaluators will use inferential techniques as part of an annual impact study. Hierarchical linear modeling may be employed for outcome analyses.


Project Evaluator:

Suzanne Hartnett
212-425-8833

Organization:

Metis Associates


 
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Last Modified: 05/01/2012