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Innovative Approaches to Literacy Program

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  1. Background/Introduction
  2. Program Overview: A-1. What is the authorizing statute for the IAL program?
  3. Program Overview: A-2. What is the purpose of the IAL program?
  4. Eligibility Requirements: B-1 Who is eligible to apply for an IAL grant?
  5. Eligibility Requirements: B-2. Can an individual school receive an IAL grant?
  6. Eligibility Requirements: B-3. If an eligible consortium applies for an IAL grant, who is the applicant and what are the responsibilities of members of the consortium?
  7. Eligibility Requirements: B-4. Are private schools eligible to apply for an IAL grant?
  8. Eligibility Requirements: B-5. How is eligibility for the IAL program determined for LEAs that are not included in SAIPE for school districts?
  9. IAL PROGRAM DEFINITIONS: C-1. What is the definition of an eligible national not-for-profit organization?
  10. IAL PROGRAMS AND LITERACY EDUCATION: D-1. Must IAL projects specifically address English and language arts as opposed to other academic content-areas?
  11. IAL PROGRAMS AND LITERACY EDUCATION: D-2. What are some elements of a high-quality plan for use of technology that can be used by school libraries?
  12. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-1. What are allowable costs under the IAL program?
  13. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-2. Must an applicant selected for an IAL grant have an approved indirect cost rate to charge indirect costs to programs?
  14. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-3. May IAL funds be used to pay stipends, bonuses, scholarships, and direct teacher support such as salaries for specialists or new teachers?
  15. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-4. May IAL funds be used for paying rent?
  16. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-5. May IAL funds be used for construction?
  17. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-6. Is there a cost share requirement for the IAL program?
  18. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-7. May applicants include the cost of food in their budgets?
  19. PROGRAM REPORTING: F-1. Are grantees required to submit an annual performance report?
  20. PROGRAM REPORTING: F-2. Must an applicant use an outside evaluator?
  21. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-1. Is IAL subject to Executive Order 12372?
  22. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-2. Must submission of charts and tables be double-spaced in an IAL grant application?
  23. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-3. Is there a page limit for the application?
  24. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-4. What is the required font for this application submission?
  25. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-1. What is an absolute priority? What is a competitive preference priority?
  26. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-2. How many absolute and competitive preference priorities are in the IAL NIA?
  27. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-3. How many points will be awarded under the competitive priorities?
  28. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PREFERENCE PRIORITIES: H-4. How does an applicant meet the absolute priority?
  29. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PREFERENCE PRIORITIES: H-5. What is a logic model?
  30. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-6. How would an LEA qualify for additional points under the rural competitive preference?
  31. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-1. On what authority are the selection criteria based?
  32. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-2. How will applications be reviewed?
  33. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-5. Will an applicant receive its scores and reviewer comments after the competitions are completed?
  34. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-6. Will the reviewers be asked to read every part of each application?
  35. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-7 Does a grantee’s past performance count as part of the overall selection process?
  36. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS: J-1. What are the applicable regulations that apply to the IAL program?

1. Background/Introduction

The U.S. Department of Education (Department) developed the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for the Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program to assist potential applicants in developing high-quality proposals. The FAQs are intended to provide applicants with guidance on the requirements governing the fiscal year (FY) 2016 IAL program competition. The FAQs do not create any rights for, or confer any rights on, any person or institutions.

The Department will provide additional or updated program guidance, as necessary, on its IAL Web site, http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovapproaches-literacy/index.html. If you have further questions that are not answered here, please e-mail Beth.Yeh@ed.gov or Daphne.Kaplan@ed.gov.

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2. Program Overview: A-1. What is the authorizing statute for the IAL program?

The IAL program is carried out under the legislative authority of the Fund for Improvement of Education (FIE), Title V, part D, subpart 1, sections 5411 through 5413 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA) (20 U.S.C. 7243–7243b).

FIE supports nationally significant programs to improve the quality of elementary and secondary education at the State and local levels and to help all children meet challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards.

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3. Program Overview: A-2. What is the purpose of the IAL program?

The IAL program supports high-quality programs designed to develop and improve literacy skills for children and students from birth through 12th grade in high-need local educational agencies (high-need LEAs, as defined in the Notice Inviting Applications (NIA)) and schools. The Department intends to support innovative programs that promote early literacy for young children, motivate older children to read, and increase student achievement by using school libraries as partners to improve literacy, distributing free books to children and their families, and offering high-quality literacy activities.

Many schools and districts across the Nation do not have school libraries that deliver high-quality literacy programming to children and their families. Additionally, many schools do not have qualified library media specialists and library facilities. Where facilities do exist, they often lack adequate books and other materials and resources. In many communities, high-need children have limited access to appropriate age- and grade-level reading material in their homes.

The IAL program supports the implementation of high-quality plans for childhood literacy activities and book distribution efforts that are supported by evidence of strong theory (as defined in the NIA).

Proposed projects under the IAL program, based on those plans, may include, among other things, activities that—

    1. Increase access to a wide range of literacy resources (either print or electronic) that prepare young children to read, and provide learning opportunities to all participating students;
    2. Provide high-quality childhood literacy activities with meaningful opportunities for parental engagement, including encouraging parents to read books often with their children in their early years of life and school, and teaching parents how to use literacy resources effectively;
    3. Strengthen literacy development across academic content areas by providing a wide range of literacy resources spanning a range of both complexity and content (including both literature and informational text) to effectively support reading and writing;
    4. Offer appropriate educational interventions for all readers with support from school libraries or national not-for-profit organizations;
    5. Foster collaboration and joint professional development opportunities for teachers, school leaders, and school library personnel with a focus on using literacy resources effectively to support reading and writing and academic achievement. For example, an approach to professional development within the IAL program might be collaboration between library and school personnel to plan subject-specific pedagogy that is differentiated based on each student’s developmental level and is supported by universal design for learning (as defined in the NIA), technology, and other educational strategies; and
    6. Provide resources to support literacy-rich academic and enrichment activities and services aligned with State college- and career-ready standards (as defined in the NIA) and the comprehensive statewide literacy plan (as defined in the NIA).
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4. Eligibility Requirements: B-1 Who is eligible to apply for an IAL grant?

To be considered for an award under this competition, an applicant must coordinate with school libraries in developing project proposals.

In addition, to be considered for an award under this competition, an applicant must be one of the following:

    1. a high-need LEA (as defined in the NIA);
    2. an National not-for-profit (NNP) (as defined in the NIA) that serves children and students within the attendance boundaries of one or more high-need LEAs;
    3. a consortium of NNPs that serves children and students within the attendance boundaries of one or more high-need LEAs;
    4. a consortium of high-need LEAs; or
    5. a consortium of one or more high-need LEAs and one or more NNPs that serve children and students within the attendance boundaries of one or more high-need LEAs.

A national not-for-profit organization that applies for an IAL grant, either as a single entity applicant or as part of a consortium, is required to submit documentation of its nonprofit 501(c)(3) status with the grant application.

To determine the eligibility of an LEA, we use the U.S. Census Bureau’s Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) for school districts for the most recent income year. A list of LEAs by State with family poverty rates (based on the SAIPE data) is posted on the Department’s Web site at the address below.

Some LEAs such as some charter school LEAs, State-administered schools, and regional education service agencies are not included in the SAIPE data for school districts. In such cases, LEA eligibility is based on a determination by the State educational agency (SEA), consistent with the manner in which the SEA determines the LEA’s eligibility for the Title I allocations, that 25 percent of the students aged 5-17 in the LEA are from families with incomes below the poverty line. Applicants must submit documentation from the State certifying official verifying that the SEA has determined this eligibility requirement is met for each LEA not listed in the SAIPE data. The IAL eligibility form is available in the IAL instructions package and on our Web site at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/ial/eligibility.html.

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5. Eligibility Requirements: B-2. Can an individual school receive an IAL grant?

No. Individual schools are not eligible to apply for a grant. However, applicants are required to coordinate with school libraries in developing project proposals. See question B-1 for a definition of eligible entities.

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6. Eligibility Requirements: B-3. If an eligible consortium applies for an IAL grant, who is the applicant and what are the responsibilities of members of the consortium?

The members of an eligible consortium are one or more NNPs that serve children and students within the attendance boundaries of one or more high-need LEAs; one or more high-need LEAs; or a combination of these NNPs and LEAs. The members of each consortium shall either 1) designate one member of the group to apply for the grant; or 2) establish a separate, eligible legal entity to apply for the grant. If the consortium decides to designate one member of the group to apply for the grant, the applicant for the group is the grantee and is legally responsible for: (a) the use of all grant funds; (b) ensuring that the project is carried out by the group in accordance with Federal requirements; and (c) ensuring that indirect cost funds are determined as required under Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) at 34 CFR § 75.564(e). Members of the consortium shall also enter into an agreement that details the activities each member plans to perform and that binds each member to every statement and assurance made by the applicant in the application. The applicant shall submit the agreement with its application (See the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards “Uniform Guidance” (2 CFR 200) at the following link: https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants_docs.).

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7. Eligibility Requirements: B-4. Are private schools eligible to apply for an IAL grant?

No, private schools are not eligible to apply for this grant nor are they eligible to receive services through an eligible LEA for this program.

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8. Eligibility Requirements: B-5. How is eligibility for the IAL program determined for LEAs that are not included in SAIPE for school districts?

An LEA that is not included on the SAIPE list, such as a charter school LEA, is considered a high-need LEA if the SEA determines, consistent with the manner in which the SEA determines that LEA’s eligibility for the Title I allocations, that 25 percent of the students aged 5-17 in the LEA are from families with incomes below the poverty line.

States may use one of two methods of estimating poverty data that involve equating another source of poverty data, such as free and reduced price lunch (FRPL) student eligibility data, to census poverty data and thereby deriving census poverty data for these “special” LEAs. These methods are consistent with the Department's guidance for calculating Title I and Class-Size Reduction program allocations for special LEAs. The first method, using FRPL data as an example, is as follows:

  1. Determine the number of children eligible for the FRPL program in each special LEA. The special LEA should use the direct certification data that the SEA described and then use a 1.6 multiplier described in question 5 of the guidance available here http://www.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/SP19-2014os.pdf. If the result is larger than enrollment just use the enrollment # to derive the census count.
  2. Divide the total census poverty number for the State by the total FRPL number for the State (the result is a "State equating factor").
  3. For each special LEA, multiply the number of FRPL children in the special LEA by the State equating factor. The result is the census poverty estimate for that special LEA.
  4. The State now has census poverty figures for all LEAs.

We believe this is a straightforward approach that involves minimal burden for States. However, some States may wish to use a second method, which tracks children who attend special LEAs back to the sending LEA in order to determine the appropriate census poverty figure for the special LEA. This second method uses the proportion of FRPL children from a regular district or districts who are attending a special LEA or LEAs and applies that proportion to the census poverty data figure for the regular LEAs, to determine: 1) an estimated census poverty data figure for the special LEAs; and 2) an adjusted census poverty data figure(s) for the regular LEAs. In order to use this method, the State must be able to identify the resident LEA of each student attending a special LEA.

Applicants are required to submit documentation from the State certifying official verifying that the SEA has determined this eligibility requirement is met for each LEA not included on the SAIPE list. The IAL eligibility form is available in the IAL instructions package and on our Web site at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovapproaches-literacy/eligibility.html.

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9. IAL PROGRAM DEFINITIONS: C-1. What is the definition of an eligible national not-for-profit organization?

The NIA defines National not-for-profit (NNP) organization as an agency, organization, or institution owned and operated by one or more corporations or associations whose net earnings do not benefit, and cannot lawfully benefit, any private shareholder or entity. In addition, it means, for the purposes of this program, an organization of national scope that is supported by staff or affiliates at the State and local levels, who may include volunteers, and that has a demonstrated history of effectively developing and implementing literacy activities.

To demonstrate that an organization is a national not-for-profit entity, factors include, but are not necessarily limited to:

  1. whether the organization's charter, articles of incorporation, or other documents establishing the organization describe its mission as being national in scope;
  2. proof that the organization has staff or affiliates at the State and local levels, who may include volunteers, as evidenced by the geographic scope of its activities;
  3. legal evidence of a current 501(c) (3) (not-for-profit) designation by the Internal Revenue Service;
  4. a certified copy of the applicant's certificate of incorporation or similar document if it clearly establishes the not-for-profit status of the applicant; or
  5. a statement from a State taxing body or the State Attorney General certifying that:
    (i) The organization is a not-for-profit organization operating within the State, and
    (ii) No part of its net earnings may lawfully benefit any private shareholder or individual.

Note: A local affiliate of an NNP does not meet the definition of NPP. Only a national agency, organization, or institution is eligible to apply as an NPP.

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10. IAL PROGRAMS AND LITERACY EDUCATION: D-1. Must IAL projects specifically address English and language arts as opposed to other academic content-areas?

We recognize the need to strengthen literacy development across academic content areas to effectively support reading and writing. Applicants may therefore propose projects that include many strategies to improve and enhance literacy development from birth to 12th grade across academic content areas. The NIA provides an overview of what types of projects the IAL program will support to strengthen literacy development in children.

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11. IAL PROGRAMS AND LITERACY EDUCATION: D-2. What are some elements of a high-quality plan for use of technology that can be used by school libraries?

A high-quality plan for use of technology might include a description of an applicant's specific goals for using technology to improve student achievement or teacher effectiveness. Such a plan would have a strong rationale and clear goals for using technology that are aligned with the IAL program’s purpose.

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12. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-1. What are allowable costs under the IAL program?

Costs must be allowable, allocable, reasonable, and necessary according to the Federal cost principles found in The Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200). A cost is allocable to a grant award if it is consistently treated like other costs incurred for the same purpose in like circumstances and is considered to be reasonable, in its nature and amount, by a prudent person under the circumstances prevailing at the time the decision is made to incur the cost. Generally, IAL grant funds can be used to support high-quality projects designed to develop and improve literacy skills for children and students from birth through 12th grade. This includes innovative programs that promote early literacy for young children and motivate older children to read and programs that increase student achievement by using school libraries, distributing free books to children and their families, and offering high-quality literacy activities.

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13. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-2. Must an applicant selected for an IAL grant have an approved indirect cost rate to charge indirect costs to programs?

Yes. ED requires grantees charging indirect costs to programs to obtain a Federally-approved indirect cost rate. An applicant that does not have an approved indirect cost rate at the time it is selected for an IAL grant award may request approval from the Department for a temporary indirect cost rate of 10% of the expended amount of the entity’s direct salaries and wages. However, a grantee must submit an indirect cost rate proposal to its cognizant agency within 90 days of receiving its grant award notice. Those applicants who plan to charge indirect costs should include a copy of the indirect cost rate agreement as an attachment when submitting their application.

Note: IAL is not subject to a “supplement-not-supplant” requirement. Unless otherwise noted in a grantee’s indirect cost rate agreement, applicants are generally permitted to use the normal “indirect cost rate” rather than the “restricted indirect cost rate” when applying for IAL funds. Grantees who use a restricted rate will recover fewer indirect costs than those who use the unrestricted rate.

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14. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-3. May IAL funds be used to pay stipends, bonuses, scholarships, and direct teacher support such as salaries for specialists or new teachers?

These expenses may be allowable in certain circumstances if necessary and reasonable to accomplish the program's and project’s objectives, consistent with applicable sections of the Uniform Guidance (2 CFR200).

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15. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-4. May IAL funds be used for paying rent?

Applicants should focus their proposed activities on high-quality literacy activities. To the extent that the leasing of some additional space is necessary and reasonable for meeting the purposes and objectives of the program, rent may be an allowable cost. (See the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards “Uniform Guidance” (2 CFR 200) at the following link: https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants_docs.)

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16. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-5. May IAL funds be used for construction?

No. A grantee may not use its grant for acquisition of real property or for construction unless specifically permitted by the authorizing statute or implementing regulations for the program. (See the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards “Uniform Guidance” (2 CFR 200) at the following link: https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants_docs.)

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17. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-6. Is there a cost share requirement for the IAL program?

No. The IAL program does not have a cost share requirement; however, applicants are encouraged to leverage grant resources by aligning other Federal, State, local, and private funds to support the project or by engaging in meaningful partnerships to increase the potential effectiveness and sustainability of the project.

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18. FISCAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR IAL PROJECTS: E-7. May applicants include the cost of food in their budgets?

No. Costs for entertainment (including food) are not allowable costs. (See Uniform Guidance 2 CFR 200).

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19. PROGRAM REPORTING: F-1. Are grantees required to submit an annual performance report?

Yes. Under the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), the Department has developed performance measures to determine the overall effectiveness of programs funded with Federal dollars, including the IAL program. The GPRA performance measures for the IAL program are:

    1. The percentage of four-year-old children participating in the project who achieve significant gains in oral language skills.
    2. The percentage of fourth graders participating in the project who demonstrated individual student growth (i.e. an improvement in their achievement) over the past year on State reading or language arts assessments under section 1111(b)(3) of the ESEA.
    3. The percentage of eighth graders participating in the project who demonstrated individual student growth (i.e. an improvement in their achievement)over the past year on State reading or language arts assessments under section 1111(b)(3) of the ESEA.
    4. The percentage of schools participating in the project whose book-to-student ratios increase from the previous year; and
    5. The percentage of participating children who receive at least one free, grade- and language-appropriate book of their own.

All grantees will be expected to submit an annual performance report that includes data addressing these performance measures, to the extent that they apply to the grantee’s project.

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20. PROGRAM REPORTING: F-2. Must an applicant use an outside evaluator?

No. However, applications submitted for the IAL program will be evaluated based on the quality of the project evaluation (See the IAL application package, Selection Criterion F). As such, applicants will be responsible for carrying out the evaluation plan/activities that are outlined in the application package.

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21. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-1. Is IAL subject to Executive Order 12372?

Yes. Executive Order 12372 concerns the Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs, and, among other things, gives States the opportunity to review and provide comments to Federal agencies on applications for Federal discretionary (competitive) grants. Applicants can find more details in the Appendix for the Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs in the IAL application package. However, potential applicants should not delay the timely submission of their applications in Grants.gov pending the outcome of the State’s review.

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22. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-2. Must submission of charts and tables be double-spaced in an IAL grant application?

Yes. Charts and tables must be prepared in double space format.

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23. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-3. Is there a page limit for the application?

Yes. The application narrative must be limited to no more than 25 pages. The application narrative is where the applicant addresses the selection criteria that reviewers use to evaluate the grant application. The page limit does not apply to the cover sheet; eligibility information; the budget section, including the narrative budget justification; the assurances and certifications; the one-page abstract; the resumes; the bibliography; the logic model, or the letters of support. However, the page limit does apply to all of the application narrative section. Please note reviewers will not read any pages of the narrative section that exceed the page limit.

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24. APPLICATION SUBMISSION: G-4. What is the required font for this application submission?

A submitted application must use a font size that is either 12 point or larger or no smaller than 10 pitch (characters per inch). The applicant must use one of the following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, Courier New, or Arial. An application submitted in any other font (including Times Roman or Arial Narrow) will not be accepted.

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25. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-1. What is an absolute priority? What is a competitive preference priority?

Under EDGAR at 34 CFR § 75.105(c)(3), the Secretary may give absolute preference to applications that meet a priority. For the IAL FY 2014 competition, all applicants must meet the absolute priority established in the NIA. Applicants that do not meet the absolute priority will not be considered for funding.

Under EDGAR at 34 CFR § 75.105(c)(2), the Secretary may award some or all bonus points to an application depending on the extent to which the application meets each competitive preference priority. These points are in addition to any points the applicant earns under the selection criteria (see 34 CFR § 75.200(b)).

In accordance with the NIA, the maximum number of additional points the Secretary may award to an application depends upon whether the application meets each competitive preference priority. Additionally, the Secretary may select an application that meets a priority over an application of comparable merit that does not meet the priority. Competitive priorities are not requirements in that applicants do not need to address them to be considered for funding. Applications that meet one or more competitive priorities will be awarded additional points.

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26. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-2. How many absolute and competitive preference priorities are in the IAL NIA?

The IAL NIA contains one absolute priority and three competitive preference priorities. For FY 2016, the following absolute priority has been established:

  • Absolute Priority—High-quality plan for innovative approaches to literacy that include book distribution, childhood literacy activities, or both, and that is supported, at a minimum, by evidence of strong theory (as defined in 34 CFR 77.1 (c)).

For the FY 2016 IAL program, the following three competitive priorities have been established:

  • Competitive Preference Priority 1—Leveraging Technology to Support Instructional Practice and Professional Development (5 points);
  • Competitive Preference Priority 2—Improving Early Learning and Development Outcomes (5 points); and
  • Competitive Preference Priority 3—Serving Rural Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) (5 points).

Applicants are strongly encouraged to identify, in the project abstract section of their applications, any competitive preference priority they intend to meet with the application, and to include a brief description of how they are qualified to meet each priority.

Please refer to the NIA under Priorities for more information on absolute and competitive priorities under the IAL program.

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27. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-3. How many points will be awarded under the competitive priorities?

Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), the Department will award an additional 5 points per priority to an application that meets Competitive Preference Priorities 1- 3. The maximum number of competitive preference points an application can receive for this competition is 15.

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28. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PREFERENCE PRIORITIES: H-4. How does an applicant meet the absolute priority?

To meet the absolute priority, applicants must submit a plan that is supported by evidence of strong theory, as defined in the NIA, including a rationale for the proposed process, product, strategy, or practice and a corresponding logic model (as defined in 34 CFR 77.1(c)).

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29. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PREFERENCE PRIORITIES: H-5. What is a logic model?

The NIA uses the definition of logic model (also referred to as theory of action) in 34 CFR 77.1(c), which defines logic model as a well-specified conceptual framework that identifies key components of the proposed process, product, strategy, or practice (i.e., the active “ingredients” that are hypothesized to be critical to achieving the relevant outcomes) and describes the relationships among the key components and outcomes, theoretically and operationally.

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30. ABSOLUTE AND COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: H-6. How would an LEA qualify for additional points under the rural competitive preference?

An applicant qualifies for competitive preference points under the rural competitive preference if the applicant’s proposed project is designed to provide high-quality literacy programming, or distribute books, or both, to students served by a rural LEA. A rural LEA, for the purposes of the IAL program, is an LEA that is eligible under the Small Rural School Achievement program or the Rural and Low-Income School program authorized under Title VI, Part B of the ESEA. Applicants may determine whether a particular LEA is eligible for these programs by referring to information on the Department’s Web site at: http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/freedom/local/reap.html.

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31. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-1. On what authority are the selection criteria based?

The selection criteria for this program are from 34 CFR § 75.210 and are listed in the NIA. The maximum score for all criteria is 100 points. The maximum possible score for each criterion is indicated in parentheses next to each criterion listed in the selection criteria section of the NIA.

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32. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-2. How will applications be reviewed?

The Department will use peer-reviewers to review and score applications on the selection criteria. The Department has sought independent reviewers from various backgrounds and professions with relevant expertise, whom we will ask to use their professional judgment to evaluate and score each application based on the selection criteria.

Following the peer-review, Department staff will determine whether the application meets the absolute priority, and will also assign competitive preference priority points to applications meeting the competitive priorities, up to a total of 15 additional points.

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33. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-5. Will an applicant receive its scores and reviewer comments after the competitions are completed?

Applicants may request a copy of the technical review forms completed by the peer reviewers on their applications. Individual reviewer names are deleted from the forms to preserve confidentiality.

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34. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-6. Will the reviewers be asked to read every part of each application?

Yes. To facilitate the review, the Department encourages applicants to carefully follow the directions in the application package. Applicants should pay particular attention to the flow of the narrative and correctly label all attachments. Please note that our reviewers will not read any pages of the narrative section that exceed the 25 page limit.

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35. SELECTION CRITERIA: I-7 Does a grantee’s past performance count as part of the overall selection process?

The Department reminds potential applicants that in reviewing applications in any discretionary grant competition, the Secretary may consider, under EDGAR, 34 CFR § 75.217(d)(3)(ii), the applicant’s past performance and use of funds under a previous grant award. The Secretary may also consider whether the applicant failed to submit a timely performance report or submitted a report of unacceptable quality.

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36. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS: J-1. What are the applicable regulations that apply to the IAL program?

    1. The following sections of EDGAR apply to the IAL program:
      • Part 75 Direct Grant Programs
        Part 77 Definitions
        Part 79 Intergovernmental Review
        Part 81 General Education Provision Act - Enforcement
        Part 82 Lobbying
        Part 84 Debarment
        Part 97 Protection of Human Subjects
        Part 98 Student Rights in Research, Experimental Programs, and Testing
        Part 99 Family Educational Rights
    2. The Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards “Uniform Guidance” (2 CFR 200)
    3. The Education Department debarment and suspension regulations in 2 CFR part 3485.
    4. The notice of final supplemental priorities and definitions for discretionary grant programs, published in the Federal Register on December 15, 2010 (75 FR 78486), and corrected on May 12, 2011 (76 FR 27637).
    5. The notice of final priorities, requirement, and definitions for the IAL program published in the Federal Register on June 17, 2014.
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Last Modified: 04/08/2016