Full Service Community Schools Program

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2010 Awards

Eleven (11) new awards were made in FY 2010.

Grantee Name
Year 1 Funding
Year 2 Funding
Year 3 Funding
Year 4 Funding
Year 5 Funding
Total
Flowing Wells Unified School District $438,954 $438,954 $438,954 $438,954 $438,954 $2,194,766
Bert Corona Charter School $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $2,500,000
Green Dot Public Schools $102,240 $463,603 $428,705 $429,005 $429,005 $1,852,558
Children and Families First $419,878 $481,246 $481,246 $481,246 $481,246 $2,344,862
Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation $499,845 $499,868 $499,631 $499,490 $499,449 $2,498,283
Indiana University $498,090 $496,596 $494,526 $499,502 $496,582 $2,485,296
Boston Public Schools $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $2,500,000
Greater Lawrence Community Action Council $487,047 $486,365 $491,647 $496,985 $498,857 $2,460,901
Paterson Public Schools $466,111 $499,759 $499,759 $499,759 $499,759 $2,465,147
Spartanburg School District 7 $497,703 $499,872 $499,844 $498,718 $499,898 $2,496,035
East Austin College Prep Academy, Inc. $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $2,500,000

Arizona Grantee Abstract

Grantee Name:Flowing Wells Unified School District
Project Name:Flowing Wells Full-Service Community Schools Program
Project Contact:Martha Petty
(520) 696-8801
Mailing Address:1556 W. Prince Road
Tucson, AZ 85705
School District:Flowing Wells Unified School District
Project Sites:Flowing Wells Jr. High (7-8)
Centennial Elementary (K-6)
Homer Davis Elementary (K-6)
Laguna Elementary (K-6)
Walter Douglas Elementary (K-6)
Partners:Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson
Flowing Wells Extension Programs, Inc.
National Community Education Association
Project Services:Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Parent Engagement Activities
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,194,766.00

Project Summary: The Flowing Wells Full-Service Community Schools Program (FW FSCSP) seeks to establish four (4) initiatives at Flowing Wells Jr. High, a persistently low achieving school currently in transformation, and four feeder elementary schools. These schools are located in a low wealth community which is considered by social service and law enforcement agencies to be an area of extreme stress for families. The four initiatives-- Project MAX, Skills for Success, Learn to Serve and Parent GED and ESL classes--will address the needs of students, parents, and community members.

The diverse neighborhoods served by the targeted schools contain the second highest number of assistance cases in Pima County. This area has also been designated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as a Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Study Area. Students served by these schools have a strong need for the additional academic and social emotional support provided by the proposed FW FSCSP. All four schools have a high percentage of at-risk students including ELL and special needs students.

The FW FSCSP will provide comprehensive, developmentally appropriate extended day academic enrichment, mentoring and community service opportunities to over 1500 students. The FW FSCSP will provide education opportunities through GED and ESL classes to over 500 parents and community members. Project MAX will involve a partnership with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson and provide weekly, year-round, one-to-one mentoring through both school site based and community based activities. Skills for Success will provide high quality after-school academic tutoring and enrichment for three hours a day in the areas of literacy, STEM and homework help for over 1500 students. Learn to Serve will provide student-let community service opportunities for over 300 students.

The FW FSCSP will provide many benefits to children, families and the entire community. As a result of the four projects, students should experience academic gains in reading, writing and STEM. The FW FSCSP will also have a major positive impact on the community through the opportunities for community service and parent education.

California Grantee Abstracts

Grantee Name:Bert Corona Charter School
Project Name:San Fernando Valley Full Service Community Schools Program
Project Contact:Yvette King-Berg
Karina Favela
(213) 688-2802
Mailing Address:9400 Remick Avenue
Pacoima, CA 91331
School District:Direct-funded charter schools in the San Fernando Valley
Project Sites:Bert Corona Charter School (grades 6-8)
Vaughn Next Century Learning Center (K-12)
Pacoima Charter Elementary School (K-5)
Charles Maclay Middle School (6-8)
San Fernando Institute for Applied Media Pilot School (6-8)
Partners:Youth Policy Institute
UCLA- Community-Based Learning
Meet Each Need With Dignity (MEND)
Phoenix House
Friends of the Family
Northeast Valley Health Corporation
Communities in Schools
Unusual Suspects
Project Services:Early Learning Services
Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Programs for Students Chronically Absent, Truant, Suspended, or Expelled
Job Training and Career Counseling Services
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care
Programs that Increase Access/Use of Social Services and Promote Family Financial Stability
Mental Health Services
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,500,000.00

Project Summary: Services provided or coordinated in the San Fernando Valley Full Service Community School (SFV FSCS) program include all 12 program areas. Based on a needs assessment completed at each target school, the program will particularly target mentoring and youth development services, remedial education and academic enrichment services, parenting education and leadership services, increased access to social service programs, and assistance for students who have been truant, suspended, or expelled through partnerships with the agencies described above that have been developed in the San Fernando Valley Poverty Initiative. The program will also provide professional development for teachers at target schools to integrate community school resources.

In all targeted schools, academic achievement levels of students significantly lag behind the state average. All targeted schools serve students from families in poverty significantly higher than the state average and require additional community support services to build academic achievement. School families are over 90% Latino and the English Learners rates are much higher than the state average.

A major objective of the project is to increase student academic achievement on state standardized tests in Years 1–5. The elementary schools will improve percentage of students who increase their California Standards Test percentile rank in the Proficient or Advanced category by average of 3 percentage points each year for English Language Acquisition (ELA) and 3 percentage points each year for math. For middle and high schools, the increase for students scoring at proficient/advanced will be 2 percentage points per year in ELA and in math. In addition, the program will improve student attendance and reduce tardiness, misbehavior write-ups, and suspensions every year. The program will increase percentage of families who consider their target school to be a safe haven conductive to learning, and will increase family involvement in the education of their children.

The San Fernando Valley FSCS program will conduct an initial Planning Period for the first six months of Year 1 that will include comprehensive needs assessment building on the work already completed. The program will then operate the final six months of Year 1 through the end of Year 5. It is expected that the San Fernando Valley FSCS program will serve 1,359 students and family members in Year 1 (a six month period after planning), 3,211 students and family members in Year 2, 3,705 students and family members in Year 3, 4,199 students and family members in Year 4, and 4,692 students and family members in Year 5.

Grantee Name:Green Dot Public Schools
Project Name:Locke Full-Service Community School Collaborative
Project Contact:Erica Gonzalez
(323) 565-1600
Mailing Address:1149 S. Hill Street
Ste. #600
Los Angeles, CA 90015
School District:Each Locke charter school serves as its own LEA
Project Sites:Alain Leroy Locke Charter High School
Locke Charter High School #1
Locke Charter High School #2
Locke Charter High School #3
Animo Lock Tech Charter High School #1
Animo Watts 2 (9-12)
Locke Launch to College Academy #1
Locke Launch to College Academy #2
Animo Locke Ace Academy
Partners:Locke Wellness Center
Los Angeles Unified School District School Mental Health
Watts Healthcare Corporation
Green Dot Public Schools
Attendance Improvement Management
Break the Cycle
Planned Parenthood
Public Counsel
Shields for Families
United Friends of the Children
United Peace Officers Against Crime
Vision Service Providers
Watts Century Latino Organization
Project Services:Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Family Engagement Programs
Programs for Students Chronically Absent, Truant, Suspended, or Expelled
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care
Programs that Increase Access/Use of Social Services and Promote Family Financial Stability
Mental Health Services
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$ 1,852,558.00

Project Summary: Green Dot Public Schools, on behalf of itself and the 8 Local Education Agencies (LEAs) created in connection with its Turnaround of Alain Leroy Locke Senior High School, will establish its Locke Full-Service Community Schools Collaborative, a project that will provide a coordinated and integrated set of comprehensive academic, social and health services to high-need students, students’ family members, and members of the Watts community in South Los Angeles.

The Watts community is one of the lowest income communities in all of Los Angeles; it is also one of the communities with the lowest educational attainment. Teen birth rates are high, as is the percentage of households with children headed by a single mother. Heavy gang activity and racial violence, combined with other Adverse Childhood Experiences typical for the area (interrupted living situations, foster care placement etc. ) put the area’s youth in the highest risk categories for mental illness and other stress-related mental health problems. The 3,300 students of the Locke schools are reflective of this community: over 90% are eligible for a free or reduced price lunch (all the Locke LEAs hold Title I status); 63% of them are Latino and 28% are African-American. A full 28% of them are English Language Learners and 11% require Special Education services. Prior to the Turnaround which was launched in fall 2008, Locke had been among the most persistently lowest-achieving schools not only in Los Angeles, but also in California and even the nation, both in terms of test scores and graduation rates.

The Collaborative will spearhead the transformation of the Locke Family of Schools into a true community school; it will add a full set of partnerships whose services, supports and opportunities will lead to improved student learning, stronger families and a healthier community. Working with the new Locke Wellness Center, an alliance among Los Angeles Unified School District School Mental Health, Watts Healthcare Corporation and Green Dot, collaborative partners will provide the eligible services listed above. Education services will be provided primarily at the school sites; the other services will be provided primarily at the new Locke Wellness Center which will open in fall 2011 and be located across the street from the main Locke campus. In all, more than 3,500 individuals will be served each year through these services.

Delaware Grantee Abstract

Grantee Name:Children and Families First
Project Name:Eastside Community Schools Initiative (ECS)
Project Contact:Sue Weimer
David Scott
(302) 777-9764
Mailing Address:2005 Baynard Blvd.
Wilmington, DE 19802
School District:Christina School District
Project Sites:Bancroft Elementary (K-5)
Stubbs Elementary (K-5)
Elbert-Palmer Elementary (K-5)
Partners:Big Brothers Big Sisters of Delaware
Christina Cultural Arts Center
Delaware Art Museum
Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts
Delaware Center for Economic Education Entrepreneurship
Delaware Symphony Orchestra
Delaware Theater Company
Food Bank of Delaware
Henrietta Johnson Medical Center
YMCA of Delaware
YWCA Delaware
ActKnowledge
Project Services:Early Learning Services
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Programs for Students Chronically Absent, Truant, Suspended, or Expelled
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care
Programs that Increase Access/Use of Social Services and Promote Family Financial Stability
Mental Health Services
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,344,862.00


Project Summary: The plan for the Eastside Community Schools (ECS) initiative focuses on five areas: Coordinated resources (e.g. building infrastructure to integrate all partner relationships, space utilization, and outreach so that families are connected to the resources they need); Enriched learning (e.g. ensuring that students, parents and community are motivated to learn; offering a full range of free after-school and summer programs); Health & Mental Health Services (serving as a hub for comprehensive services to address the physical, mental, and emotional needs of the children and families); Family & Community Engagement (e.g. developing a comprehensive plan for parent and other family engagement); and Early Childhood (e.g. developing high quality early childhood opportunities for all children entering kindergarten, including birth). In partnership with ActKnowledge, Children and Families First (CFF) will conduct comprehensive program evaluation to measure effectiveness of ECS in achieving positive outcomes around academic performance; attendance rates; school environments; and parental involvement.

The neighborhoods in the school feeder pattern face multiple challenges that negatively impact children’s chances for success, including high rates of poverty and unemployment, and low rates of homeownership and educational attainment. CFF, in partnership with the Christina School District, will provide Full-Service Community School programming at Bancroft, Stubbs, and Elbert-Palmer Elementary Schools. All three are Title I schools, serving Kindergarten through fifth grade, and will begin offering Pre-Kindergarten services to a targeted group of children this fall. Stubbs is a Persistently Lowest-Achieving School. Both Bancroft and Stubbs will begin to implement the Transformation model this fall. The three identified schools serve approximately 900 students in grades K through 5 each year, in addition to 100 students to be served in Pre-K beginning this fall. The ECS will serve all students in the schools, as well as parents, family members, and in some cases, community members.

Indiana Grantee Abstracts

Grantee Name:Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation
Project Name:Evansville Vanderburgh Full Service Community Schools
Project Contact:Patricia Weinzapfel
(812) 435-8457
Mailing Address:123 Main Street
Evansville, IN 47708
School District:Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation
Project Sites:Academy for Innovative Studies (6-12)
Cedar Hall Community School (PK-8)
Culver Family Learning Center (ages 3-5)
Lincoln School (K-8)
McGary Middle School (6-8)
Partners:School Community Council
YMCA
YWCA
Youth First, Inc.
Girl Scouts of Raintree Council
Boy Scouts of America
Boys and Girls Club
Big Brothers Big Sisters
Southwestern Healthcare
St. Mary’s Hospital
Old National Bank
Hospitality and Outreach for Latin Americans (HOLA)
Evansville Police Department
Division of Family Resources (DFR)
Early Childhood Development Coalition
Various additional partners
Project Services:Early Learning Services
Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Programs for Students Chronically Absent, Truant, Suspended, or Expelled
Job Training and Career Counseling Services
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care
Programs that Increase Access/Use of Social Services and Promote Family Financial Stability
Mental Health Services
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,498,283.00

Project Summary: The Evansville Vanderburgh Full Service Community School (EVSC FSCS) initiative is committed to enhancing existing resources and integrating FSCS services into a comprehensive network of programs and services while pursuing a common mission of “establishing school sites as places of community to enhance youth and family development. " Full Service Community Schools will be expanded and fully developed in five newly transformed schools serving students from pre- to high school that are among the highest poverty, lowest achieving, and most at-risk in the community.

The Evansville community exceeds state and national poverty rates, with 17.4% below poverty level in the county and 21.3% in the city (IN: 13.1%; US: 13.2%), and 23,518 (14.4% (10,578) of households) receiving food stamps (IN: 14.0% US: 8.7%). The EVSC serves 22,527 students throughout Vanderburgh County in 16 elementary, 8 middle, 5 high, 4 K-8, and one alternative school; 25% are minority (75% white, 14% black, 7% multiracial, 2% Hispanic, 1% Asian, and 1% Native American), and 22.6% receive special education. Over 10 years, the EVSC has seen a 44% increase in poverty (39% in ’00 to 56% in ’10), and 200% increase in ESL students (32 lang. in ’10; 56% Spanish). The district has been in NCLB improvement status for six years.

In 2000, the EVSC spearheaded the development of a district-wide community school initiative called the School Community Council (SCC). To date, over 70 community organizations, businesses, and faith-based partners are working in partnership to support schools. Components of the full-service community school framework are already in place in some schools. EVSC will transform high poverty and persistently low performing schools into Full-Service Community Schools. Elements include early childhood learning centers, after school and summer programs, a college access network, access to health services, social and emotional supports, and alternatives to suspension/expulsion.

Cedar Hall, Lincoln and McGary are persistently lowest achieving schools. The five full-service community schools described in this proposal will employ varying levels of school transformation as part of the district-wide strategic plan. These initiatives include the four areas critical to school transformation: (1) new leadership and increased teacher effectiveness; (2) comprehensive instructional reforms; (3) increased learning time and community-oriented schools; and (4) operational flexibility and sustained support. Collectively, a total of 1,836 students and their families will be served.

Grantee Name:Indiana University
Project Name:The Martindale Brightwood Alliance for Educational Success
Project Contact:Nicole Y. Oglesby
(317) 278-2161
Mailing Address:620 Union Drive
Suite 244
Indianapolis, IN 46202
School District:Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS)
Project Sites:School #51 (K-6)
School #56 (PK-8)
School #69 (K-6)
Partners:100 Black Men
100 Black Men
Boy Scouts of America Indianapolis
Child Care Answers Play and Learn
Choices
Edna Martin Christian Center
Felege Hiywot Garden Center
Gleaner’s Food Bank
HealthNet
Indianapolis Public Schools
Indy Parks
IU Schools of Education, Nursing, and Social Work
Indiana Partnerships Center
Ivy Tech Community College
Learning Well
Martindale Brightwood Community Development Corporation
Rebuilding the Wall
Project Services:Early Learning Services
Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Programs for Students Chronically Absent, Truant, Suspended, or Expelled
Job Training and Career Counseling Services
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care
Programs that Increase Access/Use of Social Services and Promote Family Financial Stability
Mental Health Services
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,485,296.00


Project Summary: Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) is partnering with Indiana University Purdue University’s Community Learning Network to implement the Full Service Community Schools (FSCS) initiative at three schools located in the Martindale Brightwood community. The comprehensive plan was developed in alignment with the Coalition for Community Schools’ logic model framework and in partnership with the schools, Community Advisory Councils, and community partners. Students will be supported and equipped to thrive in academic achievement through a continuum of services in collaboration with strategic partners.

The Martindale Brightwood neighborhood is located on the Near Eastside of Indianapolis, Indiana in Marion County. Martindale Brightwood has a high proportion of children under the age of five living in poverty (47.8%) – nearly triple the County average. It has notably low educational attainment for its residents. Almost 39% of Martindale Brightwood residents over the age of 25 do not have a high school diploma.

In years 1-5, the Martindale Brightwood students and their families that attend Indianapolis Public Schools #51, 56, and 69 will be the targeted population for services. School #51 is a Title 1 elementary school with grades K-6 and 92% of their students are eligible for Free/Reduced Lunch. School #51 is implementing the Turnaround School Improvement Model. School #56 is a Title 1 “Magnet” Montessori-learning school that serves Pre-K-8th grade students. 82% of their students are eligible for Free/Reduced Lunch. School #69 is a Title 1 elementary school with grades K-6, and 93% of their students are eligible for Free/Reduced Lunch. School #69 has not met Annual Yearly Progress.

This FSCS model has as its targeted population students, parents and families with children in the Martindale Brightwood community. The census data for the group is 8,204. It is projected that in year 1, 60% (4,922) of the population will receive services through the grant. The percentage will grow to 85% (6,937) by year 5 because of community wide programming, including efforts to impact student enrollment, increase parental participation and engage community members served through the school and neighborhood partners.

Massachusetts Grantee Abstracts

Grantee Name:Boston Public Schools
Project Name:Boston Public School’s Full Service Community School Grant
Project Contact:Marta Gredler
(617) 635-6609
Mailing Address:443 Warren Street
Dorchester, MA 02121
School District:Boston Public Schools
Project Sites:Jeremiah Burke High School (9-12)
Young Achievers Science and Mathematics Pilot School (K-8)
Higginson-Lewis K-8 School (PK-8)
Partners:Focus Training
Private Industry Council
Freedom House
NAACP
City Year
Children’s Hospital Neighborhood Partnerships
Tutors for All
Wediko’s School-Based Services
Black Ministerial Alliance
New England Eye Institute
Boston University’s Smart Smiles Dental Program
Boston Medical Center’
Project Services:Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Programs for Students Chronically Absent, Truant, Suspended, or Expelled
Job Training and Career Counseling Services
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care
Programs that Increase Access/Use of Social Services and Promote Family Financial Stability
Mental Health Services
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,500,000.00

Project Summary: The overall context for the Boston Public Schools Full-Service Community School (BPS FSCS) initiative is the 5-Year Acceleration Agenda, an ambitious plan with rigorous academic targets. The comprehensive plan will support community partnerships that align with each school’s instructional priorities in four key priority areas across schools: 1) improving achievement of English Language Learners (ELLs); 2) increasing family engagement, education, and support; 3) re-engaging students who have a history of low attendance, negative behavior and/or academic failure; and 4) meeting the health needs of students and their families.

Jeremiah Burke High School has been identified as a persistently lowest-achieving school by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. With this effort, BPS will break new ground by demonstrating that the full-service schools approach is a powerful strategy to turn around persistently under-performing schools. Key partners in the Burke’s FSCS will be Focus Training, the Private Industry Council, Freedom House, the NAACP and City Year. Partners will provide academic supports/enrichment; mentoring/youth development; family education, engagement, and support; and assistance to students who have been chronically absent, truant, suspended, or expelled.

In 2009-2010, the Young Achievers Science and Mathematics Pilot School (550 students in grades K1-8) merged with the under-performing Lewenberg Middle School and had 47% new students this past school year. Key partners will be Children’s Hospital Neighborhood Partnerships, Tutors for All, and Wediko’s School-Based Services. Partners will provide primary health care access/coordination; academic support/enrichment; and assistance to students who have been chronically absent, truant, suspended, or expelled.

Higginson-Lewis K-8 School (383 students in grades PK-8) merged with the underperforming Lewis Middle School in 2009. Key partners in the Higginson-Lewis will be the Black Ministerial Alliance, the New England Eye Institute, Boston University’s Smart Smiles Dental Program, and Boston Medical Center’s Department of Pediatrics. Partners will provide family education, engagement, and support; primary health and dental care; and mental health services.

The target population of the BPS FSCS is the students and their families, and other members of each school community. Students and families in these schools have more ethnic/racial diversity and a much higher percentage of poverty compared to statewide data. According to the BPS risk classification system, a third to more than half of some classes at each school is likely to drop out without sustained intervention. The project will serve an estimated 1790 individuals in year one, increasing to 2,163 by year five.

Grantee Name:Greater Lawrence Community Action Council
Project Name:South Lawrence East Full Service Community School Program
Project Contact:Susan Mitchell
(978) 620-4706
Mailing Address:305 Essex Street
Lawrence, MA 01840
School District:Lawrence Public Schools
Project Site:South Lawrence East Middle School (5-8)
Partners:Boston University, School of Dental Medicine
Boys and Girls Club of Lawrence
Boys and Girls Club of Lawrence
Family Services, Inc.
Family Services, Inc.
Lawrence Family Preservation/Parent Aide Program
Lawrence Family Preservation/Parent Aide Program
Project Services:Early Learning Services
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care

Programs that Increase Access/Use of Social Services and Promote Family Financial Stability
Mental Health Services
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,460,901.00

Project Summary: Greater Lawrence Community Action Council (GLCAC, Inc. ) in collaboration with the Lawrence Public Schools and a variety community partners will increase student academic achievement at the South Lawrence East Full Service Community School (SLE FSCS) through the provision of empirically-based wrap around support services which will be offered to students, their families and the community.

The median family income in the city is $32,007, the lowest in the state. Lawrence has the highest percentage of foreign born residents from Latin America in the state and the LPS system has the highest percentage of Hispanic students (89.4%). Hispanic median family income is $26,557. Among female householders this figure is a mere $21,510. Children raised in a female-headed Lawrence household are 91% likely to grow up in poverty. As of February 2010, 96% (11,761) of Lawrence elementary and secondary students received free or reduced lunch. Lawrence’s 4-year high school graduation rate is 48.1%, the lowest in the state among public non charter schools. In addition to being poor and undereducated, Lawrence residents face numerous other challenges. Lawrence has the highest percentage of children in the states (70%), who speak a language other than English at home. Linguistic isolation can severely inhibit the ability of an individual or group of people to access mainstream culture and the upward social and economic mobility that correlates to this access.

The Lawrence Public School district is fully Title 1 eligible and the SLE FSCS has been identified as a Level 4 Persistently Lowest Achieving School. The SLE FSCS serves students in grades 5-8 and is located on the SLE Educational Complex which consists of the Breen School and the SLE Elementary School. Standardized Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment tests (MCAS) scores for the SLE FSCS reveal that 71% of students scored either “Needs Improvement” or “Warning/Failing” on the English Language Arts (ELA) test and 89% scored either “Needs Improvement” or “Warning/Failing” on the Math portion of the test.

In order to ensure academic growth for all SLE FSCS students, GLCAC, Inc. and its partners have proposed a comprehensive plan that includes after-school, weekend, evening and summer support services. The SLE FSCS Plan is being offered in support of the SLE Transformation Plan as part of the district’s requirements to comply with regulations from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. The Transformation Plan further addresses issues of absenteeism, truancy and suspension. The SLE FSCS will serve 2,373 of the poorest students, families and community members in Massachusetts.

New Jersey Grantee Abstract

Grantee Name:Paterson Public Schools
Project Name:Paterson Public Schools: A Renewed Commitment to Excellence through Full Service Community Schools
Project Contact:Tobi Knehr
(973) 321-1000
Mailing Address:90 Delaware Ave.
Paterson, NJ 07503
School District:Paterson Public School District
Project Sites:School #5 (1-8)
New Roberto Clemente (K-8)
Napier School of Technology (5-8)
Partners:New Jersey Community Development Center
Paterson YMCA
Paterson Education Foundation
St. Paul’s Community Development Center
Catholic Family & Community Services
Paterson Public Library
Clinical Outreach Services LLC
Children’s Aid Society
Project Services:Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Job Training and Career Counseling Services
Nutrition Services and Physical Activities
Primary Health and Dental Care
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,465,147.00

Project Summary: The Paterson Public School District (PPS) in Paterson, New Jersey is committed to reforming its school system. It has embraced the concept of full service community schools (FSCS), and believes that an integrated focus on academics, health, social services, youth development and community engagement will help students, families and community members develop to their full potential.

PPS has been long troubled. In 1991 it was taken over by the NJ Department of Education, and it remains under state control today. Families in Paterson live in poverty, with a median income of $38,921, less than 40% of the national average. The minority population is large, crime rates are high and unemployment is soaring. Students at Paterson schools generally perform poorly, with students’ scores on standardized tests trailing their peers across the state and the nation.

PPS proposes to convert three Title I schools to FSCS: these are School # 5, serving grades 1-8; New Roberto Clemente (NRC), serving grades K-8; and the Napier School of Technology, serving grades 5-8. School #5 will be converted in Year 1 of the grant, and NRC and Napier in Year 2.

Programs and services that will be provided include:

  • In-school clinic with medical, dental and mental health services
  • In school academic assistance
  • Afterschool program
  • Evening youth and community center
  • College bound/career program
  • Anti-bullying/violence prevention
  • Summer youth employment
  • School day and afterschool sports, fitness, and nutrition programs
  • Family nights
  • Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) programs
  • Performing and visual arts
  • Adult literacy and ESL
  • Youth ESL and literacy clubs
  • Adult and youth GED
  • Workforce development, emergency food, and housing services
  • Assistance for disabled youth and adults, immigrants and the hearing impaired

Napier School of Technology is a persistently lowest-achieving school. Last year PPS completely reorganized this school, using the turnaround model. Through the collaboration of PPS and our partners, we will prepare our children to be ready to learn every day, assist our families in helping their children and themselves, and provide resources to strengthen our entire community. Over the life of the project, Paterson FSCS will serve 2,790 people, including 311 Napier students, 811 NRC students, 20% of their families and 125 community members.

South Carolina Grantee Abstract

Grantee Name:Spartanburg School District 7
Project Name:Family Circle: From Cradle to College
Project Contact:Terry Pruitt
(864) 594-6188
Mailing Address:610 Dupre Drive
Spartanburg, SC 29307
School District:Spartanburg School District 7
Project Site:Park Hills Early Learning Center (0-K4)
Partners:City of Spartanburg
Spartanburg County Foundation
Spartanburg Regional Foundation
Regenesis Community Health Center
First Steps of Spartanburg
University of South Carolina-Upstate
USC-Upstate Metropolitan Studies Institute
The Riley Institute at Furman University
Mary Black Foundatio
Big Brothers, Big Sisters of the Upstaten
Project Services:Early Learning Services
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Primary Health and Dental Care
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,496,035.00

Project Summary: The objective of Family Circle: From Cradle to College is to implement a comprehensive program at an Early Learning Center focusing on Early Childhood Education, Remedial Education, Health Care Services, and Parenting, that will reduce the impact of teen pregnancy, single-parent homes and multi-generational poverty on student achievement.

Spartanburg School District 7 has approximately 7,200 students with 64% receiving free and reduced lunch. In 2006 26.5% of births in Spartanburg, SC were born to mothers with less than a high school education and 37.2% were births to single mothers. Review of the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-3 (DIAL-3) data indicates that 54% of the scores of four-year-olds tested for the 2009-2010 Child Development classes indicated potential delay. Kindergarten and first grade students’ literacy levels were assessed with the Dominie Portfolio for Reading and Writing in the fall of 2009. The results indicated that 46% of the kindergarten students and 47% of the first grade students needed additional and substantial intervention. The annual dropout rate is 6.6%, close to double the SC median district rate of 3.4%. Spartanburg County has the fourth highest number of teen pregnancies in S.C. with the highest rates of estimated pregnancies, repeat pregnancies, live births and repeat births are within District 7 attendance boundaries. Only 1 in 4 teen mothers will ever graduate from high school.

Each of the partners provides services to limited subgroups of our students, family and community. This team has the objective of leveraging resources to deliver timely services to convenient locations. The year 1 focus will be upon planning and validating current services and delivery models. Years 2-5 will focus on providing services onsite at Parks Hills Early Learning Center (0-K4). Park Hills Elementary School is a persistently lowest-achieving school that will be closed in June 2011 and reopen in August 2011 as an Early Learning Center. The early learning center service model will be validated during years 1 and 2 and expanded in years 3-5. The project will serve 5,000 individuals, including 600 students, 1,200 family members and 3,200 community members.

Texas Grantee Abstract

Grantee Name:East Austin College Prep Academy, Inc.
Project Name:Community DREAM-Link (Delivering Resources for an Enrichment and Academic Mission)
Project Contact:Jennifer Nelson
(512) 583-2546
Mailing Address:Southwest Key Programs
6002 Jane Lane
Austin, TX 78721
School District:Austin Independent School District
Project Site:East Austin College Prep Academy Charter Middle School (Grades 6-8) (EACPA)
Partners:Southwest Key Programs
East Austin Community Family Center
Huston-Tillotson University
University of Texas at Austin – Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Boys and Girls Club of Central Texas
Travis County Constable – Precinct 1
League of United Latin American Citizens
People Organized in the Defense of Earth and her Resources
Girls Scouts of Central Texas
Hispanic Physicians Association
Advanced Micro Devices
State Farm Insurance
Project Services:Remedial Education & Academic Enrichment Activities
Family Engagement Programs
Mentoring and Other Youth Development Programs
Community Service and Service Learning Opportunities
Job Training and Career Counseling Services
Mental Health Services
Adult Education, Including ESL Instruction
Total (5-Year Funding):$2,500,000.00


Project Summary: East Austin College Prep Academy (EACPA), a local education Agency and a certified charter school in Austin Texas will implement a Full Service Community Schools program in one of the most distressed neighborhood of East Austin, Texas. The DREAM-Link initiative will be established at three adjacent sites: 1) East Austin College Prep Academy; 2) Boys and Girls Club of Central Texas; and 3) El Centro del Familia, established by Southwest Key Programs (SKP). As the parent organization of EACPA, SKP will play an active role in supporting the DREAM-Link Initiative. SKP, with over 55 programs in seven U.S. states, has an outstanding reputation implementing effective youth and family programs in Texas and throughout the U.S.

The target area is the East Austin Govalle/Johnston Terrace neighborhood. The population of East Austin in 2009 was 35,938 of which 58.9% were Hispanic, 30.7% were African American and 55% live in poverty. The unemployment rate for this area was 12.5% and 54% of the region’s working age population did not have a high school diploma. The goal of the DREAM-Link Initiative is to improve academic achievement, attendance, behavior, engagement, and other developmental skills of students and adults through an integrated array of research-based proven programs related to education, social, emotional and economic development for students, families, and community residents of the target area.

The objectives are to: 1) Improve academic performance of students; 2) Improve student behavior and well being; 3) Improve student engagement; and 4) Increase parental/ community resident engagement.

East Austin College Prep Academy (EACPA), a charter middle school, Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Texas and El Centro del Familia will host three sites that will provide a range of FSCS services. These sites will serve students from the charter middle school 6th through 8th grade, three high schools 9th through 12th grade, four middle schools 6th through 8th grade and seventeen elementary schools K - 5th grade residing in East Austin Govalle/Johnston Terrace neighborhood and surrounding area. All schools are receiving Title I funds. In fact, one high school (Johnston) has been rated academically unacceptable for four consecutive years and another (Reagan) has been has been rated academically unacceptable for two consecutive years. Through its integrated focus, DREAM-Link will serve a total of 1,975 participants in Year One (1,200 students and 775 family/community members) and a total of 2,275 participants per year (1,300 students and 975 family/community members) in Years Two through Five.


 
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Last Modified: 08/23/2013