Arts in Education—Model Development and Dissemination Grants Program

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2009 Awards

Four (4) new awards were made in FY 2008.
Grantee Name:The Friends of The Children’s Museum at La Habra
Project Name:Young at Art
Project Director:Maria Tinajero-Dowdle
562-905-9793
Funding Amount:$189,000
Number of Schools Served:Four (4)
Number of Students Served:1,989


Young at Art is a standards-based arts education program for Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade students and K-2nd grade teachers that features visual art, music and drama activities in classrooms and at The Children’s Museum at La Habra. The Children’s Museum at La Habra and the La Habra City School District LEA will partner together to provide standards-based education instruction integrated into the school curriculum, direct student experience with the three arts modalities onsite at the Museum, follow-up standards-based education instruction at the school, and professional arts development workshops for the teachers. Through opportunities for doing, looking at, thinking and talking about music, theater/performing arts, and visual arts, the student learning objective is that students will practice language arts and math readiness skills and processes.

Expected student outcomes include students understanding appropriate vocabulary to describe and express opinions (Language Arts); identifying features or elements of a visual, musical, performed, and written text (Language Arts); analyzing features of an art form (Language Arts); and identifying, describing, and extending literal and implied patterns in visual arts, music, and theater/performing arts (Mathematical statistics). Through opportunities for doing, looking at, thinking and talking about music, theater/ performing arts, and visual arts with their students and in professional development, the teacher learning objective is that teachers will lead students in integrated arts and core curriculum learning experiences in the classroom and at The Children’s Museum at La Habra that help students develop language arts and mathematics readiness skills. Expected teacher outcomes include teachers increasing their appreciation of how the arts help students learn, and integrating various art forms into language arts and mathematics lesson

Young at Art will serve a total of 5,967 K-2nd grade student participants and 162 teachers over four years. Eighty-four percent (84%) of students to be served will be of minority race; 42% will be designated English Language Learners; and 67% will be impoverished. Young at Art will serve all Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade classes in the La Habra City School District, for a total of 48 classrooms at 4 elementary schools served each year.

Grantee Name:Oakland Unified School District
Project Name:Music Integrated Learning Environment (MILE) Project
Project Director:Fillmore Rydeen
510-879-8116
Funding Amount:$196,000
Number of Schools Served:Three (3)
Number of Students Served:Information not available


The Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) of California, in collaboration with the Music in Schools Today (MuST) and the Music-in-Education National Consortium (MIENC) and building on previous NEA funded projects, proposes the Music Integrated Learning Environment (MILE) Project. To improve teacher instruction and student performance in both the arts and other core academic areas, the MILE project will pilot a cross-school collaborative process for developing and implementing standards-based, music integrated curricula. In line with district priorities the proposed model school partnerships will involve first one high performing laboratory school as the professional development center of the project in collaboration with three of Oakland Unified School District’s high poverty elementary schools. Dissemination project results will begin with ten other high poverty schools in the final year of the project.

A unique feature of the MILE program is the cross-sectional design that include both the development of MILE early music integration literacy and drum circle interventions in grades K-2 and music integrate social understanding and school climate interventions in grades 3-5 thus creating an entire K-5 program in the three implementation years of the project. Also unique is the guidance and support each group will receive from content area external partners from local arts learning organizations (MuST) and national organization (MIENC) that will provide an ongoing professional development targeted to teachers’ needs as the MILE grade level cohorts progress over time. Evidence of the impact of arts integrated learning on music learning, academic performance, social-emotional development, and school climate of randomly selected participating schools will be compared against levels of conventional music learning, academic performance, social development and school climate three demographically matched control group high poverty schools.

Each participating MILE school will form a collaborative team with representative school administrative staff, arts and classroom teachers, and arts learning mentors and consultants from external partnering organizations. These teams will plan and implement the two-phase integrated curriculum as a three-school cluster. A comprehensive professional development program, directed by a collaborating team of OUSD, MIENC and MuST staff, will prepare a team of administrators, classroom teachers, music specialists and/or teaching artists for their roles in each of the schools participating in theMILE program. A documentation, assessment, and research component—using and building upon the MIENC’s field-tested instruments and tools developed in collaboration with OUSD district staff—will help the schools, and ultimately the larger arts learning community, to understand better the impact of the arts on learning and social development, and how cross-school partnerships increase capacity to offer music integration projects that meet arts learning, social development and school climate goals as high poverty schools in a large urban school district.

The project evaluation, led by outside evaluator David Reider, OOUSD evaluator Wes Watkins and Principal Investigator Larry Scripp, Ed.D., will use rigorous scientifically based research methods, including intensive data collection from a random assignment of student populations for the formative and summative evaluation in each of the three treatment schools and assessment of the dissemination of the MILE program to ten high poverty schools in the Oakland Unified Schools District.

Grantee Name:Chicago Public Schools, District #299
Project Name:Information not available
Project Director:Margaret Venckus
773-553-5422
Funding Amount:$245,000
Number of Schools Served:Six (6)
Number of Students Served:Information not available


The Chicago Public Schools (CPS), in collaboration with the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE), proposes the International Baccalaureate –Teaching Arts Project (IB-TAP). To improve teacher instruction and student performance in the arts and other core academic areas, IB-TAP will pilot a collaborative process for developing and implementing standards-based, arts-integrated curricula in grades 6 through 8. The project builds on CPS’ International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IBMYP) as well as on CPS’ ongoing work with CAPE. The six treatment and three matched control group schools will be randomly selected from the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme in CPS.

Artist partners will be chosen from CAPE’s experienced team of teaching artists who are expert at collaborating with teachers in challenged schools. Each group will form a collaborative team with each school’s IB coordinator and arts teacher. These teams will plan and implement arts integrated curriculum through a partnership structure. A comprehensive professional development program and mentoring by experienced arts integration practitioners, directed by CPS and CAPE, will prepare team members, classroom teachers, and teaching artists for their roles. A documentation, assessment, and research component—using and building upon CAPE’s field-tested instruments—will help the schools, and ultimately the larger educational community, understand the impact of the arts on learning and how arts partnerships build capacity.

The independent project evaluation, led by Louanne Smolin, Ed.D. and Larry Scripp, Ed.D., will use rigorous scientifically based research methods, including random selection of schools and students.

Grantee Name:Milwaukee Public Schools
Project Name:The Imagine ARTS project
Project Director:Kimberly Abler
414-475-8051
Funding Amount:$265,527
Number of Schools Served:Four (4)
Number of Students Served:1,770


The Imagine ARTS project will serve four diverse high needs Milwaukee schools with 1,770 students. These four Milwaukee Public Schools have a large number of students that are considered high poverty and a large number of students with special needs. The Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest district in Wisconsin, will partner with Arts@Large to provide arts integration services that will be implemented, evaluated and disseminated. The goal of this school-wide program is to develop an effective model of quality standards-based arts integration that is replicable with practical applications in urban classrooms and sustainable in districts with limited resources. The objectives include: 1) increase student academic achievement in reading and mathematics through standards-based integrated arts; 2) increase students’ access to and participating in high quality arts education activities and programs; 3) increase frequency of collaboration among stakeholders to foster a sustainable standards-based arts integration model. Professional development will be provided for the entire faculty of each participating school, providing specific strategies and research based techniques to integrate visual and performing arts into non-arts disciplines to increase academic achievement in the area of reading and mathematics. Artist educators will provide artist in residencies designed to integrate various arts disciplines with reading and mathematics. Integration specialists will model art integration strategies and team-teach with classroom teachers. Each school will be linked with arts partners who will provide direct services to students through standards based integrated arts activities.

Imagine ARTS will: increase student achievement in literacy and mathematics through arts education: increase cross-curricular integration of the arts curriculum into core curricular subject matter; increase and improve collaborative planning among core subject teachers with art teachers; improve balanced Milwaukee Public Schools arts/literacy/mathematics instruction in targeted schools; increase opportunities for the sequential study of the arts in a K-8 setting; increase parental and family learning opportunities in the arts and literacy; strengthen arts partnerships in the community. Each school site is unique and this model allows teachers and staff to shape the arts/literacy/mathematics initiatives for their program based on the educational needs of their students. The arts will be integrated into each school educational plan to support learning goals, increase student engagement and increase student achievement. The evaluation of the pilot project will measure the impact of integrated arts learning strategies in individual student development and achievement over time. This will guide the district in the expansion of this project. The methods and results of the project will be published via the internet and will be presented in professional journals and conferences to allow the results to be replicated by urban schools across the country.


 
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Last Modified: 08/19/2009