Alaska Native Education Equity

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Frequently Asked Questions

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  1. The NIA for new awards for FY 2011, published in the Federal Register on January 31, 2011, provides an estimated range of awards of $300,000 to $700,000.
  2. The NIA states that the project period is "up to 36 months." Does my grant have to last 3 years?
  3. Where can I get help with submitting my application electronically through Grants.gov?
  4. What is GPRA?
  5. What must a grantee do in order to claim indirect costs under its ANE grant?
  6. If, at the time it receives its ANE grant award, a grantee does not have an indirect cost agreement with its cognizant Federal agency, must it submit its indirect cost proposal to its cognizant Federal agency within a certain timeframe?
  7. If a partnership includes a nonprofit organization and (a) one or more LEAs or (b) one or more SEAs, which entity's indirect cost rate should the eligible applicant use?
  8. What is the definition of "persistently lowest-achieving schools?"
  9. The approved State application for SIG includes a list of schools with different classification.
  10. Who will determine if applications meet the priority and, therefore, qualify for the competitive priority points?
  11. Will an applicant receive more competitive preference priority points if it includes more than one "persistently lowest-achieving school" in its application?
  12. What should an applicant consider if it wants to include a “persistently lowest-achieving school" in it's application for funds under the ANE program?

1. The NIA for new awards for FY 2011, published in the Federal Register on January 31, 2011, provides an estimated range of awards of $300,000 to $700,000.

What does this mean? Is this the maximum amount of the grant for all 3 years?


The estimated range of awards provided in the NIA represents the amount we estimate will be awarded under each grant on an annual basis. Grants may be awarded for amounts above or below the estimated range of awards. The estimates are provided to give prospective grantees an idea of the size of an average award in order to assist applicants in developing their applications and budgets. Budgets should be reasonable for the proposed activities and number of individuals to be served.

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2. The NIA states that the project period is "up to 36 months." Does my grant have to last 3 years?

The maximum amount of time for which a grant may be awarded is three years. The minimum amount of time for which a grant may be awarded is one year. Applicants must state in their application the number of years for which they are seeking funding. Applicants should develop their budgets to cover each year of funding.

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3. Where can I get help with submitting my application electronically through Grants.gov?

Applicants can get help with submitting their applications electronically through Grants.gov. Please click on "Applicant Tips and Tools" in the lower right corner of the screen. For additional tips related to the electronic submission of grant applications, please refer to “Submit Application Tips” on the Grants.gov homepage.

**Important Note: Please remember that using the Grants.gov website requires registration, which may take five or more business days to complete. Each applicant also must update its Central Contractor Registry (CCR) registration on an annual basis. New registrations usually take 3-5 business days to process once completed by the vendor. Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit their applications early to avoid any last minute registration or electronic issues.

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4. What is GPRA?

The Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) of 1993 require all federal agencies to establish goals, measures, and targets. The purpose of GPRA is to enhance the effectiveness, efficiency, and accountability of federal programs. GPRA directs agencies to focus management efforts on results.

GPRA measures have been established for the Alaska Native Education program. For further information, please consult the notice inviting applicants.

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5. What must a grantee do in order to claim indirect costs under its ANE grant?

Under 34 C.F.R §75.560(b), if a grantee has not already done so, it must obtain a current indirect cost rate from its cognizant Federal agency in order to charge those costs to its grant. The cognizant Federal agency is generally the Federal department or agency providing the grantee with the most Federal funding subject to indirect cost support, or an agency otherwise designated by OMB. However, Department regulations provide that it is the SEA, on the basis of a plan approved by the Secretary that must approve an indirect cost rate for each LEA that requests it to do so. See 34 C.F.R §75.561.

For additional information about obtaining an approved indirect cost rate or applying for an indirect cost rate, contact the Department’s Office of the Chief Financial Officer at (202) 377‐3909 or (202) 377‐3838.

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6. If, at the time it receives its ANE grant award, a grantee does not have an indirect cost agreement with its cognizant Federal agency, must it submit its indirect cost proposal to its cognizant Federal agency within a certain timeframe?

A grantee that does not have an indirect cost agreement must submit an indirect cost proposal to its cognizant Federal agency within 90 days of receiving its ANE grant award notification. See 34 C.F.R §75.560(b).

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7. If a partnership includes a nonprofit organization and (a) one or more LEAs or (b) one or more SEAs, which entity's indirect cost rate should the eligible applicant use?

The entity that is applying on behalf of the partnership is the applicant. When completing ED Form 524, the applicant’s indirect cost rate should be used.

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8. What is the definition of "persistently lowest-achieving schools?"

Persistently lowest-achieving schools means, as determined by the State and described in the State application for the School Improvement Program (SIG): (i) Any Title I school in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring that (a) is among the lowest-achieving five percent of Title I schools in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring or the lowest-achieving five Title I schools in improvement, corrective action, or restructuring in the State, whichever number of schools is greater; or (b) is a high school that has had a graduation rate as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b) that is less than 60 percent over a number of years; and (ii) any secondary school that is eligible for, but does not receive, Title I funds that: (a) is among the lowest-achieving five percent of secondary schools or the lowest-achieving five secondary schools in the State that are eligible for, but do not receive, Title I funds, whichever number of schools is greater; or (b) is a high school that has had a graduation rate as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b) that is less than 60 percent over a number of years.

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9. The approved State application for SIG includes a list of schools with different classification.

Which schools on the list, if included in an application for funds under the ANE program, are eligible for the additional five competitive preference priority points?

All "Tier I" and "Tier II" schools on the list are eligible for the additional five competitive preference priority points.

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10. Who will determine if applications meet the priority and, therefore, qualify for the competitive priority points?

The ANE program staff will award the competitive preference priority points.

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11. Will an applicant receive more competitive preference priority points if it includes more than one "persistently lowest-achieving school" in its application?

No. Applicants will be awarded five (5) points regardless of whether they propose to serve 1, 2, or 3 "persistently lowest-achieving schools." As long as one "persistently lowest-achieving" school is included, the full five (5) points will be awarded.

**NOTE: In order to receive the five points, it is very important that applicants clearly list the school(s) that will be served by the project in the project abstract.

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12. What should an applicant consider if it wants to include a “persistently lowest-achieving school" in it's application for funds under the ANE program?

Some schools identified as "persistently lowest-achieving" will receive SIG funding and will be required to adopt one of four school intervention models (turnaround, restart, school closure, or transformation). If an applicant proposes to serve a school that it anticipates will receive SIG funds, it should ensure that the proposed ANE project services are consistent with the school intervention model selected. So, for example, if an applicant wishes to include a school it anticipates will receive SIG funding, it should consider the fact that the school will be required to undergo major changes that may impact staffing, administration, and possible closure. Additionally, the school will receive a large amount of funding under SIG – up to $2 million per year for three years.

The applicant should carefully consider these factors in its proposal. It should not propose services that cannot be implemented because they are inconsistent with the SIG reform models. For more information on the reform models and SIG requirements, see the SIG Web site.

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