Parents MY CHILD'S ACADEMIC SUCCESS
Foreword -- Helping Your Child Become a Reader

Years of research show clearly that children are more likely to succeed in learning when their families actively support them. When you and other family members read with your children, help them with homework, talk with their teachers, and participate in school or other learning activities, you give your children a tremendous advantage.

Other than helping your children to grow up healthy and happy, the most important thing that you can do for them is to help them develop their reading skills. It is no exaggeration to say that how well children learn to read affects directly not only how successful they are in school but how well they do throughout their lives. When children learn to read, they have the key that opens the door to all the knowledge of the world. Without this key, many children are left behind.

Childlike drawing of a mother sitting akimbo and reading to a small child.

At the heart of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 is a promise to raise standards for all children and to help all children meet those standards. To help meet this goal, the President is committed to supporting and promoting the very best teaching programs, especially those that teach young people how to read. Well-trained reading teachers and reading instruction that is based on research can bring the best teaching approaches and programs to all children and so help to ensure that "no child is left behind". However, the foundation for learning to read is in place long before children enter school and begin formal reading instruction. You and your family help to create this foundation by talking, listening, and reading to your children every day and by showing them that you value, use, and enjoy reading in your lives.

This booklet includes activities for families with children from infancy through age 6. Most of the activities make learning experiences out of the everyday routines in which you and your children participate. Most use materials that are found in your home or that can be had free-of-charge from your local library. The activities are designed to be fun for both you and your children as you help them to gain the skills they need to become readers. Enjoy them!

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Last Modified: 09/01/2003