Growing Up Drug–Free: A Parent's Guide to Prevention – 1998

A r c h i v e d  I n f o r m a t i o n

Chapter 8: Where To Get Information And Help

The U.S. Department of Education does not endorse any private or commercial products or services, or products or services that are not affiliated with the federal government. The sources of information listed on this and the following pages are intended only as a partial listing. Readers of this booklet are encouraged to research and inform themselves of the many additional products and services relating to drug and alcohol abuse available to them.

Support groups

Alcoholics Anonymous World Services. A worldwide fellowship of sober alcoholics whose recovery is based on Twelve Steps. No dues or fees; self-supporting through small voluntary member contributions. Accepts no outside funds; not affiliated with any other organization. 475 Riverside Dr., New York, NY 10115; (212) 870-3400 nationwide, (212) 647-1680 in Manhattan. Website: http://www.aa.org/

Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters. A free, nonprofit, worldwide organization that supports and provides literature to family members and friends of alcoholics. 1600 Corporate Landing Pkwy., Virginia Beach, VA 23454-5617; (800) 344-2666 or (800) 356-9996. Website: http://www.al-anon.alateen.org/

Families Anonymous, Inc. A worldwide organization that offers a 12-step, self-help program for families and friends of former, current, or suspected abusers of drugs or alcohol who have related behavioral problems. P.O. Box 3475, Culver City, CA 90231-3475; (800) 736-9805 or (310) 313-5800. Website: http://www.familiesanonymous.org

Nar-Anon Family Group Headquarters. An organization that supports people who have friends or family members with drug problems. P.O. Box 2562, Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA 90274-8562; (310) 547-5800.

Narcotics Anonymous. A 12-step fellowship of recovering addicts. Meetings are free. P.O. Box 9999, Van Nuys, CA 91409-9099; (818) 773-9999. Website: http://www.wsoinc.com/

Toughlove International. A national self-help group for parents, children, and communities that emphasizes cooperation, personal initiative, and action. It publishes newsletters, brochures, and books and holds workshops. P.O. Box 1069, Doylestown, PA 18901; (800) 333-1069. Website: http://www.toughlove.org/

Information on drug prevention and treatment

Safe and Drug-Free Schools Program. The federal government's primary vehicle for preventing drug use and violence among youth. Provides funding and technical support for school-based education and prevention activities. U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-6123. (202) 260-3954. Publications: (877) 433-7827. Website: http://www.ed.gov/offices/OSDFS/

African American Family Services (AAFS). A comprehensive resource center with a specific focus on substance abuse within the African-American community. Through AAFS, individuals and organizations may purchase culturally sensitive on-site training packages, books, pamphlets, videos, and pre-assembled journal article packets related to chemical dependency and African-American client populations. Adult and adolescent outpatient treatment services. 2616 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55408; (612) 871-7878 or (800) 557-2180.

American Cancer Society. Offers literature on smoking and referrals to local chapters. 1599 Clifton Rd. NE, Atlanta, GA 30329; (800) 227-2345. Website: http://www.cancer.org/

American Council for Drug Education. Provides information on the effects of drug usage and offers treatment referrals through its hotline. 164 W. 74th St., New York, NY 10023. Information: (800) 488-DRUG and www.acde.org. Referrals: (800) DRUG-HEL(P) and www.drughelp.org. For immediate specific assistance or referral: (800) COC-AINE; (888) MAR-IJUA(NA); (800) HEL-P111; (800) 9HE-ROIN; (800) REL-APSE; (800) CRI-SIS9.

CDC National AIDS Clearinghouse (CDC National Prevention Information Network). Treatment referrals. P.O. Box 6003, Rockville, MD 20849-6003; (800) 458-5231. Website: http://www.cdcnac.org/

Hazelden Foundation. A foundation that distributes educational materials and self-help literature on quitting alcohol, tobacco, and drugs. P.O. Box 176, Center City, MN 55012-1076; (800) 257-7800. Website: http://www.hazelden.org/

Join Together. A national resource that provides publications, information, and linkages between groups and individuals working to prevent, reduce, and treat substance abuse and gun violence in their communities. 441 Stuart St., 7th Fl., Boston, MA 02116; (617) 437-1500. Website: http://www.jointogether.org/

Los Ninos Bien Educados. A program that works with Latino parents to assist with the challenges of child rearing in the U.S. 1131 Ventura Blvd., Suite 103, Studio City, CA 91604; (800) 325-CICC.

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. An organization that provides information, including literature and referrals on how to overcome alcohol and drug addiction. 12 W. 21st St., 7th Fl., New York, NY 10010; (212) 206-6770 or (800) NCA-CALL. Website: http://www.ncadd.org/

National Crime Prevention Council. An organization that works to prevent crime and drug use by providing parents and children with audio-visual materials, reproducible brochures, and other publications. P.O. Box 1, 100 Church St., Amsterdam, NY 12010; (800) 627-2911. Website: http://www.ncpc.org/

National PTA Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Project. With the GTE Corporation, creators of "Common Sense: Strategies for Raising Alcohol and Drug-Free Children," a new area of the National PTA's Children First website (http://www.pta.org/). Focuses on learning the facts about alcohol and other drugs, setting clear limits for children, providing positive role models, and building strong bonds within the family and school. Program offers effective, easy-to-use ideas and materials, enjoyable games and activities. 330 North Wabash Ave., Suite 2100, Chicago, IL 60611-3690; (800) 307-4782 or (312) 670-6782. Website: http://www.pta.org/

National Institute on Drug Abuse. NIDA supports more than 85% of the world's research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction. 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-1124. Website: http://www.nida.nih.gov/

Parents and Adolescents Recovering Together Successfully (PARTS). A self-help group that supports families in recovery. 12815 Stebick Court, San Diego, CA 92310-2705; (619) 698-3449.

Parent to Parent. An organization that empowers parents to counter influences of drug culture in their children's lives. 1240 Johnson Ferry Place, Suite F10, Marietta, GA 30068; (800) 487-7743.

Partnership for a Drug-Free America. An organization that works with the advertising industry to develop anti-drug public service messages and operates a comprehensive website for parents. 405 Lexington Ave., Suite 1601, New York, NY 10174; (212) 922-1560. Website: http://www.drugfree.org/

SafeHomes. A national organization that encourages parents to sign a contract stipulating that when parties are held in one another's homes they will adhere to a strict no-alcohol/no-drug-use policy. c/o Erie County Council for the Prevention of Alcohol and Substance Abuse, 4255 Harlem Rd., Amherst, NY 14226; (716) 839-1157.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)/National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI). A resource that provides a wide variety of federal government agency publications dealing with alcohol and other drug abuse. P.O. Box 2345, Rockville, MD 20847-2345; (800)SAY-NOTO. Website: http://www.health.org/

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)/Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP). A division of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services that provides a wide variety of resources and information on science-based prevention strategies and programs. 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockwall II Building, Suite 900, Rockville, MD 20857; (301) 443-0365.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)/Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT). A division of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services whose hotline provides counseling referrals and treatment options in your state. NCADI, P.O. Box 2345, Rockville, MD 20847-2345; (800) 662-HELP. Website: http://www.drughelp.org/

Youth Power. Formerly "Just Say No" International, a program that now emphasizes youth empowerment, self-esteem and a sense of community through volunteering, tutoring peers, cleaning up the environment, and helping senior citizens. 2000 Franklin St., Suite 400, Oakland, CA 94612; (510) 451-6666 or (800) 258-2766. Website: http://www.youthpower.org/

Parent mobilization groups for drug prevention

The following organizations are resources for parents that provide publications, advocacy, and, in some cases, advice on what approaches are most effective:

African American Parents for Drug Prevention

4025 Red Bird Ave.
Cincinnati, OH 45225
(513) 475-5359

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA)

901 North Pitt St., Suite 300
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 706-0560 or (800) 54-CADCA

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)

511 E. John Carpenter Freeway, Suite 700
Irving, TX 75062
(214) 744-6233 or (800) GET-MADD
Website: http://www.madd.org/

National Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse

300 W. Cesar Chavez Ave., Suite B
Los Angeles, CA 90012-2818
(213) 625-5795

National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics

1402 Third Ave., Suite 1110
Seattle, WA 98101
(206) 467-7686

National Families in Action

Century Plaza II, 2957 Clairmont Road, Suite 150
Atlanta, GA 30329
(404) 248-9676; Website: http://www.nationalfamilies.org/

National Hispanic/Latino Community Prevention Network

P.O. Box 33800
Los Angeles, CA 90033
(916) 442-3760

Parents' Resource Institute for Drug Education, Inc. (PRIDE)

3610 DeKalb Technology Pkwy, Suite 105
Atlanta, GA 30340
(800) 853-7867; Website: http://www.prideusa.org/

Red Ribbon Works (a program of Greenville Family Partnership)

P.O. Box 10203
Greenville, SC 29603
(864) 467-4099; Websites: http://www.gfpdrugfree.org/ and http://www.redribbonworks.org/default.asp

Parenting websites

Adolescence Directory Online (ADOL): http://education.indiana.edu/cas/adol/adol.html

Pregnancy & Parenting: For Today's Mom: http://parenting.ivillage.com/

Partnership for a Drug-Free America: http://www.drugfree.org/

White House Office of National Drug Control Policy: http://www.projectknow.com/

Recommended reading

Hawkins, J.D. and others. Preparing for the Drug-Free Years: A Family Activity Book. 1988. Developmental Research and Programs, Box 85746, Seattle, WA 98145. $10.95.

Strasburger M.D., Victor. Getting Your Kids to Say "No" in the '90's When You Said "Yes" in the '60's. 1993. New York: Simon & Schuster. $11.00.

Wilmes, David J. Parenting for Prevention. 1995. The Johnson Institute-QVS, Inc., 7205 Ohms Lane, Minneapolis, MN 55439-2159. $13.95.

Keeping Youth Drug-Free: A Guide for Parents, Grandparents, Elders, Mentors and Other Caregivers. 1996. U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA/CSAP. (800) 662-HELP. Free.

Marijuana: Facts Parents Need To Know. National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, NCADI Publication No. PHD712, 1995. Free.

Parents: Getting a Head Start Against Drugs Activity Book. 1993. U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA. (800) 662-HELP. Free.

Bibliography

Source material quoted is listed by chapter.

Chapter 1: How This Book will Help You

Bachman, J.G., L. D. Johnston, and P.M. O'Malley. "Smoking Drinking, and Drug Use Among American High School Students: Correlates and Trends, 1975-1979." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 71, 59-69.

Fehr, K. and H. Kalant. "Long-Term Effects of Cannabis on Cerebral Functions: A Review of the Clinical and Experimental Literature." Cannabis and Health Hazards. Proceedings of an ARF/WHO Scientific Meeting on Adverse Health and Behavioral Consequences of Cannabis Use. Fehr, K. and H. Kalant, eds. Toronto: The Addiction Research Foundation, 1981.

Johnston, Lloyd D., Jerald G. Backman, and Partick M. O'Malley. Monitoring the Future. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, 1997.

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Cigarettes, Alcohol, Marijuana: Gateways to Illicit Drug Use. New York: October 1994. Research based on analysis of National Household Survey on Drug Abuse conducted by National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1991.

National Institute on Drug Abuse. Marijuana: Facts Parents Need to Know. Washington D.C. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, NCADI Publication No. PHD712, 1995.

Partnership for a Drug-Free America. Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: Parents. New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.

--- Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: Teens. New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.

Resnick, Ph.D., Michael D., and others. "Protecting Adolescents From Harm: Findings From the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health." JAMA, September 10, 1997.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Office of Applied Studies. National Household Survey on Drug Abuse. Rockville: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Office of Applied Studies, 1996.

Chapter 2: Laying the Groundwork

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse III: Teens and Their Parents, Teachers and Principals. New York: September 1997.

Partnership for a Drug-Free America. Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: Parents. New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.

---Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: Youth. New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.

Chapter 3: Talking With Your Children Effectively

Johnston, Lloyd D., Jerald G. Bachman, and Patrick M. O'Malley. Monitoring the Future. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, 1997.

Partnership for a Drug-Free America. Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: Teens. New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.

Chapter 4: Your Child's Perspective

Horatio Alger Association. The State of Our Nation's Youth: A Study of the Current Attitudes of American Teenagers. Alexandria: Horatio Alger Association, 1996.

Chapter 5: How to Teach Your Child about Drugs

DeWit, Ph.D., David J., David R. Offord, M.D., and Maria Wong, M.Sc. "Patterns of Onset and Cessation of Drug Use Over the Early Part of the Life Course." Health Education & Behavior, vol. 24, December 1997, 744-756.

Johnston, Lloyd D., Jerald G. Bachman, and Patrick M. O'Malley. Monitoring the Future. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, 1997.

Partnership for a Drug-Free America. Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: Teens. New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.

--- Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: Youth. New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.

Chapter 6: What To Do If You Think Your Child Might Be Using Drugs

Anthenelli, Robert M. and Marc A. Schuckit. "Genetics." Chap. 5 in Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Textbook. 3rd ed. Lowinson, M.D., Joyce H., and others, eds. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1997.

Leshner, Alan I. "Addiction is a Brain Disease, and It Matters." Science, vol. 278, 1997.

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Cigarettes, Alcohol, Marijuana: Gateways to Illicit Drug Use. New York: October 1994. Research based on analysis of National Household Survey on Drug Abuse conducted by National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1991.

Chapter 7: Getting Involved and Staying Involved

Botvin, Ph.D., Gilbert J., and others. "Long-term Follow-Up Results of a Randomized Drug Abuse Prevention Trial in a White Middle Class Population." Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 273, no. 14, 1995.

Partnership for a Drug-Free America. Partnership Attitude Tracking Study: New York: Partnership for a Drug-Free America, 1997.


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[Getting Involved And Staying Involved] [Table of Contents]