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U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan Calls Texas High School Teacher Kyle Brenner to Discuss Post on Department's "Listening and Learning Tour" Blog
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FOR RELEASE:
June 30, 2009
Contact: Sandra Abrevaya
sandra.abrevaya@ed.gov
(202) 401-1576

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today called Kyle Brenner, a world history teacher and debate coach at Princeton High School in Princeton, Texas to discuss comments Brenner recently posted on the U.S. Department of Education's Listening & Learning Tour blog at http://www.ed.gov/blog/topic/listening-tour/.

As part of the Listening & Learning Tour, Duncan is traveling to 15 or more states to solicit feedback from a broad group of stakeholders around federal education policy in anticipation of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The tour is gathering input on the Obama administration's education agenda, including early childhood, higher standards, teacher quality, workforce development and higher education.

The Department created the Listening & learning Tour blog on May 11th, 2009 to expand the reach of the conversation. Since Duncan's first post, the Department has helped facilitate the conversation by featuring questions on raising standards, education challenges in rural areas, using data to inform instruction and turning around low-performing schools. The blog also features posts from senior Department officials who are accompanying Duncan on the tour stops around the country. To date more than 400 comments have been posted by individuals from across the country. To join the conversation, visit: http://www.ed.gov/blog/topic/join-the-conversation/ .

To read Brenner's entry in its entirety, visit: http://www.ed.gov/blog/2009/05/secretary-arne-duncan
-takes-listening-tour-online-invites-comments-on-raising-standards/
#comment-91
. The following is an excerpt from Brenner's post: "Teacher Pay: This often cited problem with education occurs in every state. Consider this, the smartest, brightest, and most gifted of America's graduates find careers that often pay into the six figures. If we raise teacher pay to match these fields think of the possibilities of new young teachers who will choose this career path. But with high pay should come increase teacher standards".

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