NEWSLETTERS
October 1, 2010 ED Review
Archived Information


 October 1, 2010
     Share this page Share this page
  Past issues
  Credits, subscribe & unsubscribe
What's inside...
TEACH Campaign
Grant Awards
An Attainable Dream
Student Aid Rules
Practice Guides
Odds and Ends
Quote to Note
Upcoming Events

TEACH Campaign

On September 27, during a live broadcast as part of NBC's Education Nation Summit, Secretary Duncan launched a national teacher recruitment campaign. The campaign features a web site—Teach.gov—dedicated to providing information and resources for students and prospective teachers, including an interactive "pathway to teaching" tool designed to help individuals chart their course to becoming a teacher. The campaign also features public service announcements (PSAs) by celebrities, members of the Administration, and local leaders celebrating our country's teachers and urging today's students to teach. "With more than a million teachers expected to retire within the coming years, we have a historic opportunity to transform public education in America, by calling on a new generation to join those already in the classroom," the Secretary emphasized. "We are working with the broader community to strengthen and elevate the entire teaching profession, so that every teacher has the support and training they need to succeed."

The campaign has several goals:

  • increasing the number, quality, and diversity of people seeking to become teachers, particularly in high-need schools (both urban and rural) and subject areas in greatest demand (math, science, technology, English language learners, and special education);
  • connecting aspiring teachers with information about the pathways to teaching, including preparation, certification, training, and mentoring; and
  • celebrating and honoring the profession of teaching.

Moving forward, the Department will be working with Facebook on an interactive application that will connect experienced teachers with young people. And, the Department will be collaborating with Ebony magazine on a series of teaching roundtables across the nation. "Education is the great equalizer in America," the Secretary stressed. "If you care about promoting opportunity and reducing inequality, the classroom is truly the place to start. Great teaching is about so much more than education." (Note: Video of the Secretary's session with NBC News' Tom Brokaw is available online.)

Also: During an Education Nation Summit interview with TODAY's Matt Lauer, President Obama called for a longer school day and year.

Top


Grant Awards

Prior to the end of the federal fiscal year (September 30), Secretary Duncan announced grants under three key programs, including the Department's remaining American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) programs. First, he announced 49 Investing in Innovation (i3) Fund grants, representing a cross-section of school districts and non-profit organizations (such as institutions of higher education) from among nearly 1,700 applicants under the $650 million program. i3 supports local efforts to start or expand innovative, research-based programs that help improve outcomes for high-need students and close the achievement gap. The Administration has requested $500 million in funding for i3 in Fiscal Year 2011. Next, the Secretary announced 21 Promise Neighborhood planning grants, representing a diverse set of communities in major metropolitan areas, small- and medium-sized cities, rural areas, and an Indian reservation. This initiative supports cradle-to-career services that improve the academic achievement and healthy development of children. The Administration has requested $210 million in funding for Promise Neighborhoods in FY 2011: $200 million for implementation grants and $10 million for new planning grants. Then, the Secretary announced 62 Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) grants, representing various states, districts, and non-profit organizations from 27 states. TIF seeks to strengthen the education profession by rewarding excellence, attracting teachers and principals to high-need and hard-to-staff areas, and providing educators with the feedback and support they need to succeed. The Administration is awarding the first two years of funding—$442 million—with further funding of the five-year grants contingent on Congressional action.

Meanwhile, the Department has also awarded new grants for charter schools, magnet schools, preventing youth substance abuse and violence, school counseling, smaller learning communities and dropout prevention, community resource centers and special education parenting centers, emergency management for higher education, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and American Indian Colleges and Universities.

Top


An Attainable Dream

Last month, the Department released a new video produced especially for Spanish-speaking families that shows how going to college is more attainable and affordable than ever. This five-minute piece profiles Samantha Hernandez, a sophomore at California State University (CSU) at Dominguez Hills, and shows the support she receives in pursuit of her academic and career goals. Her story is told in her own words, as well as those of her fellow students, faculty advisor, college president, and family members—in Spanish. The camera follows Hernandez on campus and at home in South Central Los Angeles. The release of this video coincided with the signing by President Obama of a proclamation commemorating National Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) Week.

Also: Both the opening and closing plenary sessions of the October 5 White House Summit on Community Colleges will be streamed live on WhiteHouse.gov. The opening session begins at 12:15 p.m. ET, and the closing session begins at 3:00 p.m. ET. In the coming days, the White House will issue a toolkit about the content and the structure of the summit.

Top


Student Aid Rules

The Department is on schedule to implement new regulations to strengthen federal student aid programs. The regulations will be released in phases. Final regulations to ensure program integrity are scheduled for publication on or around November 1, 2010, and will go into effect on July 1, 2011. These regulations will address sections of the agency's gainful employment proposal for the for-profit education sector, as well as 13 other issues, in an effort to protect students from aggressive or misleading recruiting practices and offer consumers better information about the effectiveness of career college and training programs. Final regulations on the remaining portions of the gainful employment proposal, dealing with a program's eligibility to receive federal student aid, are scheduled for publication in early 2011. These regulations were originally scheduled to be published on or around November 1, 2010, but the Department is taking additional time to consider the comments received and to host several meetings and public hearings in the coming weeks. These gatherings will allow interested parties to clarify the comments they have submitted and respond to questions from Department officials, while permitting the regulations to go into effect on or around July 1, 2012.

Top


Practice Guides

The What Works Clearinghouse has issued two new practice guides, with practical recommendations for educators to help them address the challenges they face in their classrooms and schools. "Improving Reading Comprehension in Kindergarten Through Third-Grade" recommends five specific steps that teachers, reading coaches, and principals can take to improve reading comprehension for young readers: teach students how to use reading comprehension strategies; teach students to identify and use the text's organizational structure to comprehend, learn, and remember content; guide students through focused, high-quality discussion on the meaning of text; select texts to support comprehension development; and establish an engaging and motivating context within which to teach reading comprehension. "Developing Effective Fractions Instruction for Kindergarten Through Eighth-Grade" recommends five strategies to help educators improve students' understanding of fractions: build on students' informal understanding of sharing and proportionality to develop initial faction concepts; help students recognize that fractions are numbers and that they expand the number system beyond whole numbers; help students understand why procedures for computations with fractions make sense; develop students' conceptual understanding of the strategies for solving ratio, rate, and proportion problems before exposing them to cross-multiplication as a procedure to use to solve such problems; and set a priority on improving teachers' understanding of fractions and how to teach them. Each practice guide recommendation includes a summary of supporting research, implementation strategies, and potential roadblocks and solutions. What Works is an initiative of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES).

Top


Odds and Ends

  • Last week, the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships teamed up with the Department and the Corporation for National and Community Service to host a Convening on the Role of Community-Based Organizations in Turning Around Low-Performing Schools. A select group of participants discussed how to strengthen partnerships between school districts, schools, and community-based organizations. The group also identified promising ways that community and interfaith service initiatives can help transform schools through academics, youth development, health and social supports, and family engagement.

  • This week, President Obama announced a new goal of recruiting 10,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers during the next two years.

  • For Constitution Day (September 17), Secretary Duncan joined HistoryMakers, civil rights leaders, and educators at Dorothy Height Community Public Charter School in Washington, D.C.

  • September 20 and 21, the Department held the "Sustainability Education Summit: Citizenship and Pathways for a Green Economy." Approximately 300 participants discussed ideas and proposals for a national agenda to advance a sustainable economy through education. Congress requested that the Department organize the summit in the Higher Education Opportunity Act.

  • For National GEAR UP Day (September 29), the Secretary visited Friendship Public Charter School in Washington, D.C., and connected via video to active projects in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

  • According to a new report jointly requested by the presidents of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine, the outlook for America's ability to compete for quality jobs in the global economy has continued to deteriorate the last five years, and the nation needs a sustained investment in education and basic research to keep from slipping further.

  • Sixteen members of the President's Advisory Council on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders were recently sworn-in during a special ceremony at the U.S. Capitol.

  • The National Archives has launched a new online tool for teaching with documents. Not only does DocsTeach.org welcome educators to explore thousands of documents in a variety of media from the holdings of the National Archives, but it also allows teachers to combine these materials using clever tools to create engaging activities. Teachers can create lessons from scratch, adapt lessons from others, or let their students create the lessons, and a single suite of tools can be applied to a range of subjects and skill levels.

Top


Quote to Note

"I know we've gone through a tough time these last two years. I do worry sometimes that young folks, having grown up or come of age in difficult economic times, start feeling as if their horizons have to be lowered, and they've got to set their sights a little bit lower than their parents or their grandparents. I just want to remind people that you guys all have enormous challenges that you're going to have to face, but you live in the most vibrant, most dynamic, wealthiest nation on Earth. If you are able to work together as a generation to tackle long-standing problems that you inherited but that are solvable, then there's no reason why the 21st century is not going to be the American Century, like the 20th century was. And, there's still billions of people around the world who want to come here, and they want to come here because they know that this is—for all our problems—still the land of opportunity."

        President Barack Obama (9/27/10), on a conference call with college and university student journalists

Top


Upcoming Events

On October 21, Lights On Afterschool!, a coast-to-coast rally organized by the Afterschool Alliance, will illuminate the nation by celebrating afterschool programs and the need they meet in keeping students safe, helping working families, and improving academic achievement. This year, 7,500 afterschool programs, including many of the Department-funded 21st Century Community Learning Centers, will host activities.

Over the next two weeks, the Department will exhibit at or sent materials to the Family Friendly Schools' Engage! All Families Conference in Las Vegas (October 6-7), the National Indian Education Association's Annual Convention in San Diego (October 7-10), the Division for Early Childhood's Annual Conference on Young Children with Special Needs and Their Families in Kansas City, Missouri (October 14-17), and the National Rural Education Association's Annual Convention in Branson, Missouri (October 15-17). If you are attending any of these events, please stop by the Department's booth or pick-up materials.

Top


Credits, Subscribe & Unsubscribe

Please feel free to contact the Office of Communications and Outreach with any questions:
Director, Intergovernmental Affairs—Stacey Jordan, (202) 401-0026, Stacey.Jordan@ed.gov
Program Analyst—Adam Honeysett, (202) 401-3003, Adam.Honeysett@ed.gov
To be added or removed from distribution, or submit comments (we welcome your feedback!), please contact Adam Honeysett. Or, visit http://www2.ed.gov/news/newsletters/edreview/index.html.


This newsletter contains hypertext links to information created and maintained by other public and private organizations. These links are provided for the user's convenience. The U.S. Department of Education does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of this outside information. Furthermore, the inclusion of links is not intended to reflect their importance, nor is it intended to endorse any views expressed, or products or services offered, on these sites, or the organizations sponsoring the sites.

Top



 
Print this page Printable view Bookmark  and Share
Last Modified: 10/06/2010