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October 11, 2002 -- ED Review
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10/11/02 ED Review
 10/11/02
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What's inside...
NCLB Update
Protecting Your Child
Financial Education
End-of-Year Grants
What Works Clearinghouse
Paying for College
Quote to Note
Upcoming Events

NCLB Update
Need help sifting through the No Child Left Behind Act? The Department's Office of the Undersecretary has developed a Desktop Reference offering a program-by-program look at the major reforms made by the new law, as well as describing how the act's four guiding principles (accountability, flexibility and local control, enhanced parental choice, and focusing on what works) are brought to bear on many of these programs. For more information, please go to http://www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/reference.html. (Programs for which no funding was requested in fiscal years 2002 and 2003 are excluded.)

On October 2, the Houston Independent School District was announced as the winner of the inaugural Broad Prize for Urban Education, edging out four other finalists: Atlanta, Boston, Garden Grove (CA), and Long Beach. The Broad Prize is an annual $1 million award created by the Broad Foundation to honor urban school districts that are making the greatest overall improvement in student achievement while, simultaneously, closing the achievement gaps across ethnic groups and between high- and low-income students. According to Eli Broad, founder of the foundation, "Ensuring achievement in America's urban public schools is the most important civil rights issue of the new century. Inner-city public school children will realize their college dreams with these scholarships, and our country will share in their success and prosperity as a whole." Houston will receive $500,000 in college scholarships; the other four finalists will each receive $125,000 in scholarships. The selection process included an analysis of quantitative and qualitative data by a review board of prominent leaders in education. For more information, please go to http://www.broadprize.org/past.shtml.

Two days earlier, 63 outstanding elementary and middle school principals from across the nation and from U.S. schools abroad were named National Distinguished Principals by the Education Department and the National Association of Elementary School Principals. "With the nation's focus squarely on student achievement and accountability for results under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001," said Secretary Paige, "principals are front and center in the effort to raise student achievement." The program was established in 1984 to recognize public and private school principals who make significant contributions to their schools and communities. Selection guidelines include: nomination by peers; demonstrated commitment to excellence; evidence of support by students, colleagues, parents, and the community; high standards and expectations for students and staff; and service as a principal for at least five years. For more information, please go to http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/09-2002/09302002.html.

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Protecting Your Child
The next "Education News Parents Can Use" broadcast (October 15, 8:00-9:00 ET) focuses on real risks to children—in and out of school. Among the topics: protecting children from abduction and exploitation; bullying and the steps that can be taken to remove the climate of fear and intimidation in schools created by bullying; identifying what a safe learning environment looks like; and establishing a "crisis plan" to help parents and schools during times of emergency. To ease concerns, the program will offer tools and resources for families, schools, and communities to keep students safe. To participate, all you need is a facility with satellite downlink capabilities. For more information, please go to http://registerevent.ed.gov/downlink/event-flyer.asp?intEventID=161. (Note: As before, you can watch live and archived webcasts of each show by going to http://www.connectlive.com/events/ednews/.)

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Financial Education
On October 3, Secretary Paige and Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill unveiled a report (http://www.treasury.gov/press/releases/docs/white.pdf) that identifies a number of options for incorporating financial education into schools:

  • including financial education in standards set by state school boards;
  • incorporating financial concepts into materials being asked on assessments;
  • urging textbook publishers to include more financial education content;
  • integrating financial education materials into classroom lessons; and
  • training teachers and staff on the importance of financial education.
The report is the result of a panel discussion of youth education groups hosted in May. Meanwhile, Secretary Paige awarded $250,000 to the Jump$tart Coalition, a group of 140 national organizations, to (1) improve student achievement on the 2004 Jump$tart Personal Finance Survey, (2) increase the number of states requiring finance education, (3) increase the number of materials being evaluated and listed in the personal finance clearinghouse (http://www.jumpstart.org/mdb/jssearch.cfm), (4) increase visitations to the clearinghouse, and (5) promote Jump$tart's National Standards in Personal Finance. For more information, please go to http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/10-2002/10032002.html.

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End-of-Year Grants
The close of the previous fiscal year (September 30) corresponded with several new grant awards. For example, on October 1, the Department's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools announced funding under the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program, [Child] Mentoring Program, and National Coordinators Program (http://www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/SDFS/news.html). That same week, three states and 10 school districts or partnerships became the first recipients under the Voluntary Public School Choice Program (http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/10-2002/10042002.html), which supports projects that offer the widest variety of choices to students in participating schools, such as options that allow students to transfer from low- to high-performing schools. And, on October 7, the Department released $198 million to help establish, develop, and expand charter schools—and to promote the exchange of information regarding what works to improve student performance among charter schools (http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/10-2002/10072002.html).

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What Works Clearinghouse
The Department-funded What Works Clearinghouse, under contract to summarize evidence on the effectiveness of different programs, products, and strategies intended to enhance student academic achievement and other important educational outcomes, is now on the World Wide Web: http://www.w-w-c.org/. Currently, the site boasts a "who, what, why" summary about the clearinghouse and a schedule of upcoming presentations. Interested parties can also sign up to receive email updates about the WWC's new work. A list of Technical Advisory Group members is forthcoming.

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Paying for College
A recent report by the Department's National Center for Education Statistics, "What Students Pay for College: Changes in Net Price of College Attendance Between 1992-93 and 1999-00," examines the most recent trends in the net price (tuition, living expenses, and other non-tuition costs) of college attendance. Price changes are reported for full-time students attending different types of institutions and trends are detailed for low-, middle-, and high-income students. Despite increases in tuition, low-income students did not pay a higher price on average in 1999-2000 than they did in 1992-93, once grant aid (federal, state, and institutional) was subtracted from the total price of attendance. However, in almost all cases, middle- and high-income students paid more. For more information, please go to http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2002174.

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Quote to Note
"If you don't believe kids can learn, then they won't. There's plenty of research showing this to be true. I could make your head swim with examples, but I'll give you one. In 1968, two researchers named Lenore Jacobson and Robert Rosenthal told teachers that they had 'spurters' in their classes—kids who displayed great intellectual promise. The researchers picked students at random and told the teachers they were the 'spurters.' And lo and behold, those children did great.... If everyone within arms-research of a child—every parent, every principal, and every teacher—made up their minds to take that leap of faith and believe in the potential and promise of that child, then just imagine the possibilities! Never before has any society set such a bold goal and said, 'We are going to educate all the children. No excuses. No ifs, ands, or buts.'" —Secretary of Education Rod Paige (10/1/02)

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Upcoming Events
October 22 and 23, the Office of Civil Rights is sponsoring "No Child Left Behind: Providing Educational Opportunity for American Indian and Alaska Native Students." For more information, please go to http://www.westoverconferences.com/nclbocr/.

Early Childhood Educator Academies (Los Angeles, 11/14-15; St. Louis, 12/3-4; and Miami, 12/9-10) will cover: (1) voluntary state guidelines for children ages three to five; (2) instructional programs, and (3) assessment and professional development. States are sending teams of individuals that play a key role in setting early childhood education policy. A waiting list for non-invitees is available. For more information, please go to http://www.ed.gov/
offices/OESE/earlychildhood/eceacademy.html
.


The "Very Best in Youth" program, sponsored by Nestlé and Reading is Fundamental, honors 30 young people (between the ages of 9 and 18) who have made reading a priority in their lives and, in the process, have made tangible contributions to the quality of life in their communities. The winners, selected from thousands of nominations, will be featured in a special publication and honored in a ceremony in Los Angeles in July 2003. Nestlé will also donate $1,000 in the name of each honoree to the charity of his or her choice. Applications are due no later than November 29. For more information, please go to http://www.rif.org/coordinators/
eventscontests/bestinyouth/vbiy2003_winnerslist.mspx.


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Credits
Please feel free to contact the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs with any questions:
Deputy Assistant Secretary -- Linda Wilson, (202) 401-0404, Linda.Wilson@ed.gov
Program Analyst -- Adam Honeysett, (202) 401-3003, Adam.Honeysett@ed.gov
To be added or removed from distribution, or submit comments (we welcome your feedback!), please contact Adam Honeysett. Or, visit http://www.ed.gov/offices/OIIA/OIA/edreview/.


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Last Modified: 05/05/2008