Press Room NEWSLETTERS
ED Review - August 30, 2002
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08/30/02 ED Review
 08/30/02
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NCLB Update: test delays and impact aid
New television series
Projections to 2012
Afterschool grants
Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll
State scholars
Quote to note
Upcoming events

NCLB Update: test delays and impact aid
Under the No Child Left Behind Act, all schools that were identified in need of improvement or corrective action as of January 7, 2002, must provide public school choice by the beginning of the 2002-03 school year. Moreover, if a school was in its second year of improvement or corrective action as of January 7, it must also offer supplemental educational services by the beginning of the 2002-03 school year. However, the proposed Title I regulations published on August 6 afford some flexibility on "how to treat those schools that made one year of AYP [Adequate Yearly Progress] in 2000-01, but have not yet received their data for the 2001-02 school year to determine if they made AYP for a second consecutive year and thus may exit improvement status." States may allow school districts to wait until the assessment data has been received to take action:

  • If the assessment results indicate that a school has made AYP for the second consecutive year, the school would not be required to offer public school choice or supplemental services.
  • If the assessment results indicate that a school has not made AYP for the second consecutive year, the school would be required to offer supplemental services immediately and to offer public school choice as soon as possible -- but no later than the beginning of the next term during the 2002-03 school year.
This guidance only applies to the current school year.

Meanwhile, the Department has issued new rules governing Impact Aid's construction grant program. The competitive grants are for the emergency repair and modernization of schools in districts that are affected by federal activities, such as a military base. For FY 2002, $48 million in grants are available under the program. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/finrule/2002-3/081602a.html.

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New television series
This fall, a new television series will be unveiled to replace the Secretary's decade-old Satellite Town Meeting. The "as-yet-to-be-named-show" will be livelier and less policy-focused to address the educational needs and concerns of parents and families. The program will include one-on-one interviews, discussion, "how to" demonstrations, video, and graphics, anchored by Education Department officials, school, community, business, and religious leaders, and researchers. Intrigued? The season premier (September 17, 8:00-9:00 ET) aims to provide parents with answers to questions they have about such No Child Left Behind topics as Annual Yearly Progress, parental options, Reading First, testing and accountability, and supplemental educational services. To participate, all you need is a facility with satellite downlink capabilities. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://registerevent.ed.gov/downlink/event-flyer.asp?intEventID=160. (Note: As before, you can watch live and archived webcasts of each show by going to http://www.connectlive.com/events/edtownmeetings/.)

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Projections to 2012
According to "Projections of Education Statistics to 2012," released by the Department's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 53.6 million students will enter K-12 classrooms this fall (a record number of students for the seventh consecutive year) and another 15.6 million students are expected to enroll in colleges and universities (a record number of students for the fifth consecutive year). Nevertheless, the report projects elementary and secondary school enrollment will peak in 2005 at 53.9 million and then decrease slightly before stabilizing at or near the end of the decade, while college enrollment is expected to rise steadily, reaching 17.7 million in 2012. Among the report's other findings: (1) the number of high school graduates is expected to reach 3.2 million in 2009, impacting college enrollment in subsequent years; (2) the number of bachelor's degrees is expected to reach a peak of 1,437,000 in 2012; and (3) the number of students earning degrees at all levels (associate's through first-professional degrees) is also expected to rise. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2002030.

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Afterschool grants
No Child Left Behind converted the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program from a federally administered discretionary grants initiative to a state-administered initiative. Indeed, of the program's $1 billion appropriation, $325 million was awarded to states on a formula basis (current grantees continue to be administered by and receive funding through the U.S. Department of Education), and many states are now conducting their own competitions. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.ed.gov/21stcclc/. (Note: A list of state Department of Education contacts is located at http://www.ed.gov/21stcclc/statecontacts.html.)

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Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll
Phi Delta Kappa International and Gallup has released its 2002 "Public Attitudes Toward the Public Schools" poll, which documents significant trends in public opinion and explores new approaches at school improvement (http://www.pdkintl.org/kappan/k0209pol.htm). The poll found significant support for an increased federal role in public school affairs: 57 percent of those surveyed believe Washington's involvement is "a good thing," versus 34 percent saying it is "a bad thing." In response to specific provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act, 67 percent support testing in grades 3-8; 96 percent support requiring teachers to be licensed in the areas that they teach; and, for schools that fail to meet state standards, 90 percent support offering tutoring by state-approved, private providers, 86 percent support "in-district" school choice, and 56 percent support termination of principals and teachers. Asked whether the goal of bringing all students to proficiency on state tests within 12 years is likely to be achieved, 80 percent thought it was "likely."

Other findings: (1) local schools continue to be regarded favorably, with 71 percent of public school parents giving the school their oldest child attends either a grade of A or B; (2) nearly three-fourths of respondents oppose reducing state spending for education as a means of dealing with current budget crises; (3) although 52 percent of those surveyed oppose the use of state vouchers to expand access to private education, 46 percent support vouchers, up from 34 percent last year; (4) significant majorities are against extending the school day (70 percent) or the school year (59 percent) but for making kindergarten mandatory (85 percent) and adding pre-kindergarten into the formal school program (82 percent); and (5) 77 percent say the enrollment of a school makes a difference in student achievement.

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State scholars
Yesterday, President Bush and Secretary Paige announced the State Scholars program, a partnership between the business community and educators to encourage students to complete courses of study beyond the minimum requirements for high school graduation. The Scholars' Core Academic Course of Study includes at least: four years of English, three years of math (algebra I and II and geometry), three years of lab science (biology, chemistry, and physics), three-and-a-half years of social studies, and two years of a foreign language. With a federal grant, the Center for State Scholars will partner with the Business Roundtable and other business organizations to select five states. Up to $2.4 million is available to implement the program. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.centerforstatescholars.org/.

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Quote to note
"I don't care for the fact that a lot of the Latino youngsters don't go to college. It's not a good statistic for America. Less than 10 percent go on to higher education. We must work to encourage participation at all levels of education. We must make it clear to our youngsters from all walks of life, particularly Hispanic youngsters, that going to college is essential to being able to fully realize the American dream.... Parents can click on a bilingual website called YesICan.gov to learn about college costs, financial aid, and what their children should be asking their guidance counselor about college.... You know, education is the pathway to success, and there's just example after example of people who came here with nothing except a dream or a hope and love and got a good education and succeeded. That's what America is about."-- President George W. Bush (8/23/02)

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Upcoming events
Planning is underway for the Department's third annual International Education Week (November 18-22, coinciding with American Education Week). The week provides schools, colleges and universities, and communities the opportunity to promote and celebrate the benefits of exchange and international education worldwide. Individuals and institutions are encouraged to submit a response sheet on their planned activities. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://exchanges.state.gov/iew2002/.

The Mayors Initiative on Leadership in Education (MILE), a U.S. Conference of Mayors/Broad Foundation partnership to enhance mayoral involvement in education issues, will hold the first of several meetings over the next year October 8 in Cleveland, Ohio. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT Joan Crigger @ (202) 293-7330.

On November 5 and 6 in New York City, the 2002 Business and Education Conference (presented by the Conference Board and the National Alliance of Business) will address: what businesses are doing to assist states and communities with the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act; how business is expanding the education reform dialogue to encompass pre-K and postsecondary education; and how some companies are leveraging their investments in education. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.conference-board.org/conferences/conference.cfm?id=347.

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Credits
Please feel free to contact the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs with any questions: Deputy Assistant Secretary -- Linda Wilson, (202) 401-0404, Linda.Wilson@ed.gov
Program Analyst -- Adam Honeysett, (202) 401-3003, Adam.Honeysett@ed.gov
To be added or removed from distribution, or submit comments (we welcome your feedback!), please contact Adam Honeysett. Or, visit http://www.ed.gov/news/newsletters/.


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Last Modified: 09/17/2003