Press Room NEWSLETTERS
ED Review - August 16, 2002
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08/16/02 ED Review
 08/16/02
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NCLB Update: Reading First and more guidance
What Works Clearinghouise
Personal safety for children
Financial aid regulations
Chief Operating Officer
NCES Classroom
Quote to note
Upcoming events

NCLB Update: Reading First and more guidance
For the most recent news and information, visit http://www.nochildleftbehind.gov/.

Over the last two weeks, four more states -- Arizona, Arkansas, Michigan, and
Utah -- were awarded grants under Reading First (http://www.ed.gov/programs/comtechcenters/03compet.html), President Bush's reading reform initiative built on scientifically based research. The states' applications were deemed excellent; each passed a rigorous panel review that judged state plans on 25 criteria. Arizona will receive $17.7 million this year and $116 million over six years. Arkansas' award is $9.8 million this year and $64.3 million over six years.
Michigan will receive $28.5 million this year and $186.5 million over six years. Utah's award is $4.6 million this year and $30 million over six years. The six year totals are subject to proper implementation, as well as congressional appropriations. Once funded, states will open competitions for sub-grants to eligible school districts. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/08-2002/08072002c.html AND http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/08-2002/08142002.html.


Under the No Child Left Behind Act, students attending schools that have not made adequate yearly progress in improving student academic achievement for three or more years must be given the option of receiving supplemental educational services. These services may include tutoring, remediation, and other educational interventions, provided that such approaches are consistent with the content and instruction used
by the school district and are aligned with the state's academic content standards. The Department's non-regulatory guidance on supplemental educational services (http://www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/SASA/suppsvcsguid.pdf) addresses both state and LEA responsibilities (including the role of parents) and tackles funding issues. (Note: The guidance is consistent with the proposed rules cited in the previous issue and published August 6 in the Federal Register -- http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/proprule/2002-3/080602a.html.)


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What Works Clearinghouise
On August 7, Secretary Paige announced a five-year, $18.5 million contract
to a unique joint venture (Campbell Collaboration of Philadelphia and
the American Institutes for Research of Washington, DC, along with their subcontractors: Aspen Systems of Rockville, Maryland; Caliber Associates of Fairfax, Virginia; and the Education Quality Institute of Washington, DC) to develop a national "What Works" Clearinghouse, which will summarize evidence on the effectiveness of different programs, products, and strategies intended to enhance student academic achievement and other important educational outcomes.
The clearinghouse will provide the following, easily accessible and searchable,
online databases:


  • An educational interventions registry that identifies potentially replicable programs, products, and practices that are claimed to enhance critical
    student outcomes -- and synthesizes the scientific evidence related to their effectiveness.
  • An evaluation studies registry, which is linked electronically to the first registry, and contains information about the studies constituting the evidence of effectiveness.
  • An approaches and policies registry that contains evidence-based research reviews of broader educational approaches and policies.
  • A test instruments registry that contains scientifically rigorous reviews of instruments used for assessing educational effectiveness.
  • An evaluator registry that identifies evaluators and evaluation entities which are willing and able to conduct quality evaluations of education interventions.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/08-2002/08072002a.html.

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Personal safety for children
Responding to some startling statistics -- each year, more than 58,000 children are abducted by non-family members, and over 200,000 children are abducted by family members who are seeking to interfere with custodial rights -- Secretary Paige and Attorney General John Ashcroft joined President Bush to unveil a new effort to help improve personal safety for children. To start with, on September 24, the President will convene a White House Conference on Missing, Exploited, and Runaway Children. The conference will bring key officials and experts, community leaders, teachers, and law enforcement together to share progress made and generate new ideas to prevent the victimization of children. The President also released "Personal Safety for Children: A Guide for Parents" (http://www.nclb.gov/parents/safety/index.html),
a guidebook offering parents specific steps to improve the safety of their children. "As parents, the President, Mrs. Bush, and I know that one of our most important jobs is teaching our children how to protect themselves from those who would do them harm," Paige said. "The recent spate of abductions...are sad reminders...that protecting our children means talking about the potential for danger out there."
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.nclb.gov/media/news/080602.html. (Note: The day before,
Secretary Paige joined over 700 school leaders, school security specialists, and experts on school safety and drug and violence prevention for the Leaving
No Child Behind: Results-Based Strategies for Safe and Drug-Free Schools
conference. His remarks are available at http://www.nclb.gov/media/news/080502.html.)


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Financial aid regulations
The Department's Office of Postsecondary Education is seeking public feedback
on proposals to simplify Title IV student financial assistance program regulations.
For example, under one change, colleges would only be required to obtain
a borrower's signature once on a master promissory note, rather than annually, before disbursing Perkins Loans. (Most borrowers in the Direct and guaranteed-loan programs already only have to sign a note once.) The changes were recommended by
a couple of ad hoc student aid committees, one that focused on loan issues and another that focused on program issues. Comments must be received on or before October 7. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/proprule/2002-3/080602b.html
(Team I --Loan Issues) AND http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/proprule/2002-3/080802a.html
(Team II -- Program Issues).


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Chief Operating Officer
Staying on higher education, on August 14, Deputy Secretary of Education
Bill Hansen announced the appointment of James Manning as acting
Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Department's Federal Student Aid office. Manning is a veteran of the Reagan and prior Bush administrations, having worked from 1989 to 1993 in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education as chief of staff and deputy assistant secretary. Since June 2001, he has served as the
Deputy Secretary's chief of staff, advising him on major budget and policy decisions and day-to-day operations. In between, Manning was chief executive officer of
the Congressional Award Foundation, a youth recognition program which encourages young Americans to involve themselves in activities that teach the lessons and value
of service, personal development, fitness, and citizenship. The student aid office is the federal government's first performance-based organization. Last fiscal year, over eight million students received more than $60 billion in federal student aid.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/08-2002/08142002a.html.


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NCES Classroom
The NCES Students' Classroom (http://nces.ed.gov/NCESKids/) features activities like What are Your Chances?, which teaches students about probability; Mathematicians are People Too, paring students with a famous mathematician and
his or her discoveries; and CRUNCH, an online magazine where students are invited
to express themselves by taking a stand on a provocative topic in education, submitting art and technical reviews or creative writing (poetry or prose), and trying their luck at a monthly brain teaser. All submissions are reviewed before they are posted.


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Quote to note
"The President kept his promise to give schools the tools to do their job and make sure that every American child to have a world-class education. Now, you [students] must do your part. Listen to your teachers. Do your homework. Read books, lots and lots of books. The more you read, the more you learn what you need to know to achieve your dreams. Dream big. Aim high. Work hard, and keep working. Hard work is the key to achieving your dreams." -- Secretary of Education Rod Paige (8/7/02)

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Upcoming events
The Secretary's Commission on Opportunities in Athletics has announced the cities and dates for its town hall meetings: Atlanta (8/27-28), Chicago (9/17-18),
Colorado Springs (10/22-23), and San Diego (11/20-21). Secretary Paige appointed the commission to examine ways of strengthening enforcement and expanding opportunities under Title IX. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/athletics/.


On October 10, communities around the country will celebrate Lights On Afterschool!, bringing attention to the need for afterschool programs that keep
kids safe, help working families, and improve academic achievement. An
Afterschool Alliance project, the rally is sponsored by JCPenney Afterschool and supported by Boys & Girls Clubs of America, the YMCA, and the Department's
21st Century Community Learning Centers. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/lights_2002/index.cfm.


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Credits
Please feel free to contact the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs with any questions:
Deputy Assistant Secretary -- Linda Wilson, (202) 401-0404, Linda.Wilson@ed.gov
Program Analyst -- Adam Honeysett, (202) 401-3003, Adam.Honeysett@ed.gov
To be added or removed from distribution, or submit comments (we welcome your feedback!), please contact Adam Honeysett. Or, visit http://www.ed.gov/news/newsletters/edreview/.


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Last Modified: 01/27/2006