Press Room NEWSLETTERS
August 12, 2002 Achiever
Archived Information


 August 12, 2002
    PDF version Share this page Share this page
  Past issues
  Subscribe    Unsubscribe
What's inside...
TAKING STEPS TO PROTECT EVERY CHILD BUSH ANNOUNCES CONFERENCE ON MISSING, EXPLOITED, AND RUNAWAY CHILDREN
LEARNING SAFELY: NEW INITIATIVES FOR DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS
BRINGING THE AMERICAN DREAM TO EVERY CHILD PAIGE, MORELLA HEAR FROM KEY RESEARCHERS ON ENGLISH ACQUISITION
HIGHLIGHTING REAL ACADEMIC SUCCESS BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS AWARD REVISED
EDUCATION AWARDS CONTRACT FOR "WHAT WORKS CLEARINGHOUSE"
TIPS FOR PARENTS

TAKING STEPS TO PROTECT EVERY CHILD BUSH ANNOUNCES CONFERENCE ON MISSING, EXPLOITED, AND RUNAWAY CHILDREN
President Bush has announced that next month he will host a White House Conference on Missing, Exploited, and Runaway children in response to the recent child abductions that have left many families fearful. "No family should ever have to endure the terrible pain of losing a child," President Bush said. "Our nation grieves with every family that has suffered unbearable loss, and our nation will fight the threats against our children. We can take hopeful and practical steps to improve our children's safety, and we will take those steps together." The Department of Justice has published a handbook, Personal Safety for Children, which contains practical advice to help families and communities make their homes, schools, and neighborhoods safer.

You can find a copy at: http://www.ed.gov/parents/academic/involve/safety/index.html

Top


LEARNING SAFELY: NEW INITIATIVES FOR DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS
On August 5, the Department of Education hosted a conference, Leaving No Child Behind: Results-Based Strategies For Safe and Drug-Free Schools. More than 700 school leaders, superintendents, school security specialists, and experts on school safety and drug and violence prevention were in Washington for the conference. The Department of Education in partnership with the U.S. Secret Service published Threat Assessment in Schools: A Guide to Managing Threatening Situations and to Creating Safe School Climates, which outlines research findings on student-instigated school violence. Read a copy of this report in MS Word or PDF or call 1-877-4ED-PUBS.

Top


BRINGING THE AMERICAN DREAM TO EVERY CHILD PAIGE, MORELLA HEAR FROM KEY RESEARCHERS ON ENGLISH ACQUISITION
Secretary Rod Paige and the U.S. Department of Education are spearheading efforts to spur English mastery and fluency. In a meeting last week with researchers and experts in childhood development, Secretary Paige and U.S. Representative Connie Morella discussed current scientific findings on teaching English literacy. Since 1999, the Department of Education and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development have been working on an initiative to address the issue of English literacy for students whose first language is not English. The partnership is studying how these children can better learn to read and write in English. Researchers are also looking into which approaches are most beneficial to which children and under what conditions. The research also addresses what teachers should know in order to be successful in the classroom. Nearly $30 million will be invested through 2004 to carry out this research. Under the No Child Left Behind Act, states are not required to use a particular method of instruction for students whose first language is not English. However, states and local education agencies must establish English proficiency standards and provide quality language instruction based on scientific research for English language acquisition, and quality academic instruction in reading and math.

To see a fact sheet on teaching English literacy, please visit: http://www.ed.gov/nclb/methods/english/english.html

Top


HIGHLIGHTING REAL ACADEMIC SUCCESS BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS AWARD REVISED
The Education Department's long-standing Blue Ribbon Schools recognition program is undergoing changes to better reflect the higher expectations and accountability of the No Child Left Behind Act. The new program requires schools to meet either of two assessment criteria: (1) schools that have at least 40 percent of their students from disadvantaged backgrounds and also dramatically improve student performance in accordance with state assessment systems, or (2) schools that score in the top 10 percent on state assessments. Of the schools submitted by each state for national recognition, at least 50 percent must meet the first criterion. Both elementary and secondary schools will be recognized every year, rather than alternating years.

For more information, please visit: http://www.ed.gov/programs/nclbbrs/index.html.

"To say that you have taught when students haven't learned is to say you have sold when no one has bought." — Madeline Hunter, 1989


Top


EDUCATION AWARDS CONTRACT FOR "WHAT WORKS CLEARINGHOUSE"
Nothing is more important to improving student achievement than having curriculum backed by research. To that end, the Department of Education has awarded a five-year, $18.5 million contract to develop a national What Works Clearinghouse, which will summarize evidence on the effectiveness of different programs, products, and strategies intended to enhance academic achievement. The What Works Clearinghouse will help provide education decision-makers with the research results they need to make good choices.

To read more about the searchable online databases that will be available through the clearinghouse, please visit: http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2002/08/08072002a.html.

Top


TIPS FOR PARENTS
During these last few weeks of summer vacation, you may be looking for some educational activities to keep your child's mind awake and alert. Here are a few ideas:

  • Cooking helps children learn new and interesting vocabulary and practical math skills. They can also learn about different foods and how to eat healthy. Include your child when you cook. Let your child prepare at least one thing for dinner. It may be messy, but it's worth the knowledge gained!

  • There are numerous games and puzzles that help children increase vocabulary and make them more fluent in speaking and writing. Remember, building a vocabulary builds confidence. Try crossword puzzles, word games, anagrams and cryptograms designed especially for children. Flash cards can also be instructive, and they are easy to make at home.

Top


Unsubscribe
We hope you find the No Child Left Behind e-newsletter of interest. We will be sending these out regularly. You can also check out our website, which is updated regularly, and serves as a one-stop shop for parents and families, teachers and principals, local and state officials, and members of the business and civic communities. If you have any questions or suggestions about topics you would like to know more about, please e-mail nochildleftbehind@ed.gov. If you would like to unsubscribe to this newsletter, please e-mail listproc@inet.ed.gov, and write this message: unsubscribe NoChildLeftBehind.

Top


 
Print this page Printable view Send this page Share this page
Last Modified: 11/02/2006