April 2005 Show Resources—Early Childhood Development: What Parents Need to Know
Archived Information


    Related Resources
Publications and web sites on early childhood development
  
    No Child Left Behind
Links and publications on the new education law
  
    Participants
Guest panelists on April 2005 show
  
 
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Resources for Arts Education

U.S. Department of Education/Government Resources

Put Reading First: Helping Your Child Learn to Read

This brochure, designed for parents, provides a quick overview of the findings of the National Reading Panel and gives ideas for what to expect from a school's reading program based on evidence from the research (preschool through grade 3). The brochure also suggests ways parents can reinforce reading instruction at home with everyday activities and interactions.

Healthy Start, Grow Smart series

This 13 book series was an initiative of Laura Bush during her tenure as the First Lady of Texas and was sponsored by the Texas Department of Health. This newborn booklet is the first of the series, which includes 12 subsequent booklets covering the first 12 months of the child. In a time when everything seems to be new and difficult, this booklet serves as a guiding tool for new parents by outlining pertinent information that they need to know in caring for their newborn and through the first year of their life.

Teaching Our Youngest

Teaching Our Youngest draws from scientifically based research about what pre-school teachers and childcare providers can do to help children develop their language abilities, increase their knowledge, become familiar with books and other printed materials, learn letters and sounds, recognize numbers and learn to count.

Good Start, Grow Smart

Good Start, Grow Smart describes the President's plan and agency directed initiatives to strengthen and improve early childhood education.

Helping Your Preschool Child

Helping Your Preschool Child highlights techniques parents can use to encourage their children to develop the skills necessary for success in school and life by focusing on activities that make learning fun. The booklet has information applicable to infants through children age five. The booklet is available in English and Spanish.

Improve Student Performance: Early Childhood—Editor's Picks

The U.S. Department of Education has compiled an archive of literature to assist educators in caring for their child through early education.

Early Reading First

Early Reading First, part of the President's "Good Start, Grow Smart" initiative, is designed to transform existing early education programs into centers of excellence that provide high-quality, early education to young children, especially those from low-income families. The overall purpose of the Early Reading First Program is to prepare young children to enter kindergarten with the necessary language, cognitive, and early reading skills to prevent reading difficulties and ensure school success.

Good Start, Grow Smart: President Bush's Plan to Strengthen Early Learning

This White House site provides a description of President Bush's plan to strengthen early childhood education, agency resources and archived speeches.

National Institute of Child Health & Human Development

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is part of the National Institutes of Health, the biomedical research arm of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NICHD ensures that every person is born healthy and wanted, that women suffer no harmful effects from reproductive processes, and that all children have the chance to achieve their full potential for healthy and productive lives, free from disease or disability, and to ensure the health, productivity, independence, and well-being of all people through optimal rehabilitation.

Head Start Bureau

The Head Start program, started in 1965, provides comprehensive health, nutritional, educational, social and mental services to children from birth to five years of age who meet federal poverty guidelines. The program also provides parents with training and education to foster their understanding of, and involvement in, the development of their children.

Schools and Organizations Participating in the Broadcast and other Resources

Reach Out and Read National Center

Reach Out and Read (ROR) is a national, non-profit organization that promotes early literacy by making books a routine part of pediatric care. ROR trains doctors and nurses to advise parents about the importance of reading aloud and to give books to children at pediatric check-ups from six months to five years of age, with a special focus on children growing up in poverty.

Bright Beginnings: Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

The Bright Beginnings Pre-K Program is an award-winning full-day, literacy-based initiative for 4-year-olds who have identified educational needs. The program is the cornerstone of the district's goal to have 85% of third-grade students reading at or above grade level. Bright Beginnings currently serves approximately 3,000 students in 157 classrooms.

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center

The Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center (SEEC) emphasizes five key concepts: child-oriented learning, real-world integrated learning, cultural diversity, critical thinking skills, and aesthetic awareness. The Center's highest priority is the provision of outstanding educational care in a nurturing environment.

National Association for the Education of Young Children

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is dedicated to improving the well being of all young children, with particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age 8.

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No Child Left Behind

Helping Your Child Series

The Helping Your Child publication series focuses on providing parents with the tools and information necessary to help their children succeed in school and in life.

No Child Left Behind—Especially for Parents Page

On this site the U.S. Department of Education offers information about public school choice, supplemental services, testing and accountability, as well as parenting tips on reading and homework.

  • Tools for Student Success: Selected Publications for Parents and Teachers This catalog provides brief descriptions of a number of publications featuring the latest research and most effective practices in subjects such as reading, homework, and staying drug free, as well as information on how to obtain these publications in hard copy or online.

  • No Child Left Behind: A Parents Guide This is the essential guide for parents, and provides answers to questions about No Child Left Behind and what the law means for parents, in an accessible and easy to understand format.

  • Questions Parents Ask About Schools This pamphlet provides answers to commonly asked questions on topics such as Getting Ready for School, Monitoring School Work, Helping with Reading, and Working with Schools and Teachers.

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Participants

Reid Lyon is a research psychologist and the Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch within the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institute of Health (NIH). He is responsible for the direction, development, and management of research programs in reading development, cognitive neuroscience, developmental psychology, behavioral pediatrics, language and attention disorders, and human learning and learning disorders. He also serves as an advisor to President George W. Bush on issues related to child development and education research and policies.

Barry Zuckerman (via satellite) is a professor of Pediatrics and Public Health at Boston University School of Medicine and Chief of Pediatrics at Boston Medical Center. Dr. Zuckerman has developed and implemented programs for children in Boston and throughout the country, which emphasize prevention that extends beyond traditional medical care. Dr. Zuckerman founded the Reach Out and Read Program (ROR) at Boston Medical Center in 1989 which now is in over 2300 sites nationwide.

Jacquelyn Jackson is the director of Student Achievement and School Accountability (SASA) Programs in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education at the U.S. Department of Education. As the SASA director, Dr. Jackson is also responsible for Title I, the Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program, the Even Start Family Literacy Programs, the Early Reading First program, the Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program, Enhanced Assessment Grants, and Programs for Children and Youth Who are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk. Dr. Jackson has served as an adjunct professor at George Washington University, Trinity College and the University of the District of Columbia.

Ellen Edmonds is the Project Director of Bright Beginnings in the Charlotte—Mecklenburg School District in Charlotte, North Carolina. Bright Beginnings Pre-K Program is an award-winning full-day, literacy-based initiative for 4-year-olds who have identified educational needs. The program is the cornerstone of the district's goal to have 85% of third-grade students reading at or above grade level. First grade test scores in literacy and math show significant and sustained benefits from participation in the program.

Windy Hill is the Associate Commissioner for the Head Start Bureau at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Head Start program, started in 1965, provides comprehensive health, nutritional, educational, social and mental services to children from birth to five years of age who meet federal poverty guidelines. Head Start and the Early Head Start Program, which started in 1995, help enrolled children achieve their full potential and succeed in school. The program also provides parents with training and education to foster their understanding of, and involvement in, the development of their children. Head Start currently serves 923,000 children across the nation.

Felicia Bluitt is the Site Manager of the Margaret H. Cone Head Start Center in Dallas, Texas. Begun as a partnership between Head Start of Greater Dallas and the Texas Instruments Foundation, the Margaret H. Cone Head Start Center is considered a model preschool program because of its demonstrated success in preparing low-income, preschool age children from one of Dallas' most impoverished communities for academic success in the school system. Studies show children who attended this center have test scores and academic performance equal to their peers in even the highest income communities in Dallas. Mrs. Bluitt has been a leader in the Early Childhood Education arena for over 15 years.

Sharon Shaffer is the Executive Director for the Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center (SEEC), a model program in museum-based education for preschoolers and kindergartners. Dr. Shaffer oversees the preschool and kindergarten program, and provides leadership for educational outreach. As part of her position, Dr. Shaffer is responsible for designing seminars to train early childhood educators and museum professionals in object-based learning and arts-centered curriculum, consulting with schools, and museums, and presenting at conferences and seminars nationally and internationally.

Jerlean Daniel is the Deputy Executive Director of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). NAEYC is the largest early childhood education organization in the world with over 100,000 members and a mission of enhancing early childhood programming and supporting professionals who work in early childhood programs. At various points along her career, Dr. Daniel served on NAEYC's board and was the president and secretary of a NAEYC-affiliated organization in Pittsburgh. Prior to becoming the Deputy Executive Director for NAEYC, Dr. Daniel chaired University of Pittsburgh's Department of Psychology in Education.

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Last Modified: 09/10/2013