May 2003 Show Resources--Serving Students with Disabilities: Helping All Children Achieve
Archived Information


May 2003 Show Resources--Serving Students with Disabilities: Helping All Children Achieve
Television Programming--U.S. Department of Education


Related Resources to May Broadcast
Online resources and organizations and publications for parents and schools
No Child Left Behind
Links and publications on the new education law
Education News Parents Can Use
Participants
A list of guest panelists on the May 2003 Education News Parents Can Use

Online resources and organizations

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) is committed to improving results and outcomes for people with disabilities of all ages. OSERS provides a wide array of supports to parents and individuals, school districts and states in three main areas: special education, vocational rehabilitation and research.

Technical Assistance and Dissemination Network--U.S. Department of Education

This U.S. Department of Education website lists numerous resources and organizations that cover a range of concerns for parents, teachers, administrators and community members interested in special education. Includes information on IDEA 1997, inclusion, transition, early childhood, and much more.

The Council for Exceptional Children

The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) is dedicated to improving educational outcomes for individuals with exceptionalities, students with disabilities, and/or the gifted. CEC advocates for appropriate governmental policies, sets professional standards, provides continual professional development, advocates for newly and historically underserved individuals with exceptionalities, and helps professionals obtain resources necessary for effective professional practice.

National Association of State Directors of Special Education

The National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) is dedicated to supporting states carry out their mission of ensuring a quality education for students with disabilities. NASDSE provides support to states through training, technical assistance documents, research, policy development, and partnering with other organizations

The National Center to Improve Practice

The National Center to Improve Practice (NCIP) works to improve educational outcomes for students with disabilities by promoting the effective use of instructional technologies among educators. In order to accomplish this goal, NCIP created a national community of educators who play a leading role in promoting and implementing instructional technologies.

The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth

The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD/Youth) assists state and local workforce development systems to better serve youth with disabilities. The NCWD/Youth is composed of partners with expertise in disability, education, employment, and workforce development issues.

National Institute for Literacy

The National Institute for Literacy (NIFL) is a federal organization that shares information about literacy and supports the development of high-quality literacy services so all Americans can develop essential basic skills.

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is an institution within the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. The NICHD seeks to assure that every individual is born healthy and wanted, and that all children have the opportunity to fulfill their potential for a healthy and productive life unhampered by disease or disability.

Opelika City School System--School to Community Transition Program

The Opelika City School System in Opelika, Alabama joined together with community leaders to provide opportunities for students to develop appropriate skills and behaviors for their lives after graduation. Students gain real world experiences that help make the transition from school an appropriate and meaningful process

Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights

The Parent Advocacy Coalition for Education Rights (PACER Center) was created by parents of children with disabilities to help other parents and families facing similar challenges. The mission is to expand opportunities and enhance the quality of life of children and young adults with disabilities and their families, based on the concept of parents helping parents.

Parent to Parent of Miami

Parent to Parent of Miami works with community members and parents to build and sustain active networks of families who have children with disabilities. Parent to Parent of Miami supports those families by providing information, educational training, support, emergency assistance and advocacy to better approach their child's disability.

Reading Rockets

The website, and the television program, Reading Rockets, look at different reading strategies that help young children learn to read; features practical advice for parents; and includes the personal stories of children, families, and teachers. Reading Rockets is a national service of public television station WETA in Washington, D.C. and is funded by a grant by the U.S. Department of Education.

Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic (RFB&D) is the nation's educational library for those with print disabilities. For 54 years, Recording for the RFB&D has been an invaluable educational resource, enabling those with print disabilities to complete their educations, advance their careers, and gain self-esteem.

Vail School District--Screening to Enhance Equitable Education Placement

Located near Tucson, Arizona, the Vail School District adopted "The Screening to Enhance Equitable Education Placement" (STEEP) program to identify and address learning problems in classrooms and with individual students. The STEEP program uses comprehensive screening to determine how to provide the right type of assistance. With the STEEP model, fewer children need special education and special education is an option only after every effort is made to address the child's needs in general education.

The What Works Clearinghouse

The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) provides educators, policymakers, and the public with a central, independent, and trusted source of scientific evidence of what works in education. The WWC is administered by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences.

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Publications

Helping Your Child Series

The Helping Your Child publication series focuses on providing parents with tools and information necessary to help their children succeed in school and life.

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 (IDEA) and its associated regulations are available in several different formats, including enhanced versions that take full advantage of the linking capabilities of the web.

National Institute for Literacy--Reading Publications

The National Institute for Literacy offers a series of publications with research-based resources and tips designed for parents, caregivers and teachers of children from birth to preschool, and from kindergarten to third grade.

A New Era: Revitalizing Special Education for Children and Their Families

President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education report on ways to strengthen America's four decades of commitment to educating children with disabilities.

Reading Tips for Parents

Provides suggestions for how parents can help their children be ready to read and ready to learn. This booklet also offers advice for selecting a good early reading program.

Ready to Read, Ready to Learn

First Lady Laura Bush highlights an initiative that encourages reading in classrooms and at home. The publication outlines various teacher recruitment and reading programs.

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No Child Left Behind

No Child Left Behind

The No Child Left Behind official web site provides resources and information to help answer questions about the new education law signed by President Bush on January 8, 2002.

No Child Left Behind--For Parents

On this site the U.S. Department of Education offers information about school choice, supplemental services, testing and accountability, as well as parenting tips on reading and homework.

The Achiever

The Achiever is a biweekly electronic newsletter published by the U.S. Department of Education that contains news and articles on education reform, tips for parents and teachers, and resources related to No Child Left Behind.

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Participants

Robert Pasternack

Robert Pasternack is the Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services at the U.S. Department of Education. In this position, Dr. Pasternack serves as principal adviser to the U.S. Secretary of Education on all matters related to special education and rehabilitative services. He has served as state director of special education for the New Mexico State Department of Education, where he led a number of initiatives designed to improve results for students with disabilities. Dr. Pasternack has worked with students with disabilities and their families for more than 25 years both as an educator and clinical director.

Amanda VanDerHeyden

Amanda VanDerHeyden is a researcher with the Vail School District in Arizona. She is affiliated with the Early Intervention Institute at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. Her research interests include applied behavior analysis in educational settings and generally finding ways to help children learn. Dr. VanDerHeyden has helped Vail schools implement the Screening to Enhance Equitable Education Placement (STEEP) model of identifying and addressing students with learning problems. As co-creator of the STEEP model with Dr. Joseph Witt, she has published many articles on the model and other school psychology issues. She serves on the editorial boards for Journal of Early Intervention and Journal of Behavioral Education.

Laurie Emery

Laurie Emery is the principal of Acacia Elementary School in Vail, Arizona, near Tucson. Acacia serves a primarily rural population and is a Title I school. Acacia uses the Screening to Enhance Equitable Education Placement (STEEP) model of identifying and addressing students with learning problems. Prior to becoming a principal, Laurie was a 5th grade teacher in Vail. She has a Masters in Education in Educational Leadership from Northern Arizona University. Mrs. Emery's particular areas of interest are assessment and teacher training.

Reid Lyon

Reid Lyon is a research psychologist and the Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch within the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As a former third grade teacher and school psychologist, Dr. Lyon has taught children with and is familiar in detecting learning disabilities at an early age. Dr. Lyon has authored and edited over 100 publications on learning differences and disabilities in children. With the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Dr. Lyon is currently responsible for special education related research and reporting findings to the Congress and other government agencies.

Isabel Garcia

Isabel Garcia is the Executive Director of Parent to Parent of Miami. Her journey in the disability movement began shortly after the birth of her daughter, Daniela, who is now 20 years old and has cerebral palsy. In 1988, Mrs.Garcia became a volunteer support parent with the newly founded Parent to Parent of Miami and discovered that a key to healing is closely related to helping others. Mrs.Garcia's personal experiences and networking with parents of disabled children inspired her to help others in a similar situation. She also serves as the director of Community Parent Resource Centers, a program funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Her 17-year-old daughter, Maritza, has been accepted to attend the University of Florida in the fall.

L.C. Thomas

L.C. Thomas is an associate minister, an ink technician and a parent of seven children in Opelika, Alabama. Mr. Thomas has two school-age sons with learning disabilities presently enrolled in Opelika City School System's special education program. With the help of the transition program and its challenging academics, vocational and community experiences, Mr. Thomas' eldest son is about to graduate high school and attend community college and pursue a vocational career.


 
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Last Modified: 07/25/2013