OVERVIEW
Preliminary Overview of Programs and Changes Included in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
Archived Information

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Title VII

    Indian Education
    (Title VII, Part A)

    Overview

    Retains, with a few changes, current programs to address the educational needs of Native American children, including formula grants to LEAs, discretionary grants, and national activities for research, evaluation, and data collection.

    Changes from Current Law

    • Integration of Services "Demonstration Project" - Authorizes LEAs receiving funds under the formula program to consolidate funds they receive from Federal programs that provide education and related services and specifically serve Indians. Requires LEAs desiring to make use of the authority to submit consolidation plans to the Secretary, which must be approved or disapproved within 90 days. Requires the Secretary to submit an interim report to Congress on the status of the demonstration project within two years of enactment, and a final report within 5 years.

    • Indian Preference in Contracting - Expands the current requirement to give preference to Indian Tribes, Tribal organizations, and institutions of higher education for grants under the Special Programs and National Activities authorities to also apply to contracts and cooperative agreements.

    • In-Service Training for Teachers - Includes a separate authority for discretionary grants to provide professional development programs to teachers in schools with substantial numbers of Indian children. (Currently, professional development is an allowable activity under Special Programs.)

    Accountability

    • National - Requires the Secretary to submit a report to the Secretary of the Interior and to Congress that includes, among other things, results from any competitive grants, if awarded, to BIA schools under the gifted and talented authority.

    • Applicant/Grantee - Requires, as part of an LEA formula grant application, an assurance that the LEA will comply with any reporting requirements the Secretary may require to determine effectiveness in improving Indian students' educational achievement.

    Funding

    • Grants to Local Educational Agencies - Formula grants to LEAs and BIA-supported schools based on the number of Indian children and the State's per-pupil expenditure for education. Grants go only to LEAs or BIA schools in which the number of Indian children is at least 10 or constitutes at least 25 percent of total enrollment. (However, LEAs in California, Alaska, and Oklahoma, and those located on or near reservations, are exempted from this requirement.) Each LEA receives at least $3,000.

    • Competitive Grants - Competitive grants to State and local educational agencies, Indian tribes and organizations, federally supported schools for Indians, and other entities. Currently funded activities include Demonstrations for early childhood projects and Professional Development (including the American Indian Teacher Corps and the American Indian Administrator Corps).

    • National Research, Data Collection, and Evaluation Activities - These activities are administered through competitions.


    Education of Native Hawaiians
    (Title VII, Part B)

    Overview

    Consolidates current programs that address the educational needs of Native Hawaiians.

    Changes from Current Law

    • Authorized Programs - Consolidates six separate programs into one comprehensive grant program and adds a separate authorization for the Native Hawaiian Education Council. Consolidated programs include: the Native Hawaiian Family-Based Education Centers, the Native Hawaiian Curriculum Development, Teacher Training and Recruitment, the Native Hawaiian Gifted and Talented, the Native Hawaiian Higher Education the Native Hawaiian Special Education, and the Native Hawaiian Community-Based Education Learning Centers.

    • Native Hawaiian Education Council - Requires the Secretary to appoint members of the Native Hawaiian Education Council based on recommendations from the Native Hawaiian community. Under current law, various entities in Hawaii, such as the State Department of Education and the State Office of Hawaiian Affairs, make these appointments.

    • Native Hawaiian Education Council Grants - Permits the council to make direct grants to carry out its duties to coordinate the educational and related services and programs available to Native Hawaiians. Requires that, from the Native Hawaiian Education appropriation, the Council receive a minimum of $500,000 annually.

    Accountability

    • Requires the Education Council to submit annual reports on the Council's activities to the Secretary and Congress, as well as any other reports or recommendations issued by the Council. Requires the Secretary to submit a report to Congress within 4 years of enactment, which summarizes the annual reports, describes the allocation and use of funds, and makes recommendations for policy changes.

    Funding Mechanism

    • Competitive grants and contracts to eligible applicants.

    Set-Asides

    • Grantees may use up to 5 percent of funds for project administration.


    Alaska Native Education
    (Title VII, Part C)

    Overview

    Retains, with some changes, the current program that addresses the educational and cultural needs of Alaskan Natives. Adds earmarking of funds to certain entities in Alaska.

    Changes from Current Law

    • Program Consolidation - Consolidates the three separate programs under current law into one program. Consolidated programs include: the Alaska Native Educational Planning, Curriculum Development, Teacher Training and Recruitment program, the Alaska Native Home Based Education for Preschool Children program, and the Alaska Native Student Enrichment program.

    • New Activities - Authorizes, among other new activities, the construction of vocational schools in rural areas. Also, requires annual grants of $1 million for cultural education programs operated by the Alaska Native Heritage Center and a cultural exchange program operated by the Alaska Humanities Forum. In addition, earmarks $1 million annually for parenting education activities and $2 million annually for dropout prevention programs. Finally, requires an Alaska Initiative for Community Engagement, which is not described in the law. [However, a similarly named activity received an earmark under FIE in 2001.]

    Accountability

    • Federal - No specific provision.

    Funding Mechanism

    • Competitive grants and contracts to eligible applicants (which include Alaska Native organizations, educational entities with experience in developing or operating Alaska Native programs or programs of instruction conducted in Alaska Native languages, cultural and community-based organizations, and other entities).

    Set-Asides

    • Grantees may use up to 5 percent of funds for project administration, elementary and schools.


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Last Modified: 01/19/2005