NCLB PROVEN METHODS
The Facts About...21st-Century Technology
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The Challenge: To improve student academic achievement through the use of technology.

The Solution: Teach children how to use the technological tools available to them and integrate that technology into the curriculum to improve student achievement.

HOW TECHNOLOGY CAN WORK WELL IN SCHOOLS

No Child Left Behind focuses on how teachers and students can use technology.
Previous federal programs focused on increasing access to more technology. In an effort to improve student achievement through the use of technology, U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige announced a new Enhancing Education Through Technology (ED Tech) initiative.

Graph showing increasing computer use in grades 4, 8, and 11 from 1984 to 1996

Percentage of students who reported using a computer at school at least once a week, by grade.

The goals of Ed Tech grants are to:

  • Improve student academic achievement through the use of technology in elementary schools and secondary schools.
  • Assist students to become technologically literate by the time they finish the eighth grade.
  • Ensure that teachers are able to integrate technology into the curriculum to improve student achievement.

Technology must enhance learning.

  • It's not enough simply to have a computer and an Internet connection in the classroom if they are not made part of the learning process.
  • Technology is a tool like any other, and the value does not come from having access to it, but rather how it is used.
  • ED Tech grants will improve the quality of education by developing new ways to apply this tool to teaching and learning.

It expands options and provides better information on education.

  • Several components of No Child Left Behind allow schools to purchase technology resources to support program goals. The result is technology aligned with specific goals tied to state academic standards.
  • Online tests deliver reports on student progress instantaneously instead of weeks later. When designed well, curriculum software can engage students in solid academic curriculum like never before.

 
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Last Modified: 06/16/2004