FR Doc 06-1796
[Federal Register: February 27, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 38)]
[Notices]               
[Page 9887-9892]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr27fe06-99]                         


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Part III





Department of Education





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National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research; Spinal 
Cord Injury Model Systems Centers (SCIMS Centers) and Disability 
Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRPs); Notices


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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

 
National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--
Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--
Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers (SCIMS Centers) and Disability 
Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRPs)

AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, 
Department of Education.

ACTION: Notice of final priorities for SCIMS Centers and DRRPs.

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SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and 
Rehabilitative Services announces a final priority for Spinal Cord 
Injury Model Systems Centers (SCIMS centers) and a final priority and 
selection criterion for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research 
Projects (DRRPs) administered by the National Institute on Disability 
and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use 
these priorities and selection criterion for competitions in fiscal 
year (FY) 2006 and later years. We take this action to focus research 
attention on areas of national need. We intend these priorities and 
selection criterion to improve rehabilitation services and outcomes for 
individuals with disabilities.

DATES: Effective Date: These priorities are effective March 29, 2006.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Nangle, U.S. Department of 
Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., room 6030, Potomac Center Plaza, 
Washington, DC 20202-2700. Telephone: (202) 245-7462 or by e-mail: 
donna.nangle@ed.gov.

    If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), you may 
call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1-800-877-8339.
    Individuals with disabilities may obtain this document in an 
alternative format (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, or computer 
diskette) on request to the contact person listed under FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Model Systems Program

    The Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) program is designed to 
study the course of recovery and outcomes following the delivery of a 
coordinated system of care for individuals with SCI. Under this 
program, SCIMS centers provide comprehensive rehabilitation services to 
individuals with SCI and conduct spinal cord research, including 
clinical research and the analysis of standardized data in 
collaboration with other related projects.
    Each SCIMS center funded under this program establishes a 
multidisciplinary system for providing rehabilitation services 
specifically designed to meet the special needs of individuals with 
SCI. These services include acute care as well as periodic inpatient or 
outpatient follow-up and vocational services. Centers demonstrate and 
evaluate the benefits and cost effectiveness of their systems for 
providing rehabilitation services to individuals with SCI and 
demonstrate and evaluate existing, new, and improved methods and 
equipment essential to the care, management, and rehabilitation of 
individuals with SCI. Centers also demonstrate and evaluate methods of 
community outreach and education for individuals with SCI in connection 
with the problems these individuals experience in such areas as 
housing, transportation, recreation, employment, and community 
activities. SCIMS centers engage in initiatives and new approaches and 
maintain close working relationships with other governmental and 
voluntary institutions and organizations to unify and coordinate 
scientific efforts, encourage joint planning, and promote the 
interchange of data and reports among SCI researchers. Additional 
information on the SCIMS program can be found at: 
http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs/res-program.html#model.


Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRP) Program

    The purpose of the DRRP Program is to plan and conduct research, 
demonstration projects, training, and related activities that help to 
maximize the full inclusion and integration of individuals with 
disabilities into society and to improve the effectiveness of services 
authorized under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Act). An 
applicant for assistance under this program must demonstrate in its 
application how it will address, in whole or in part, the needs of 
individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds (34 CFR 
350.40(a)). The approaches an applicant may take to meet this 
requirement are found in 34 CFR 350.40(b). Additional information on 
the DRRP program can be found at: 
http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs/res-program.html#DRRP.

    We published a notice of proposed priorities (NPP) for these 
programs in the Federal Register on December 13, 2005 (70 FR 73738). 
The NPP included a background statement that described our rationale 
for proposing these priorities. This NFP contains several changes from 
the NPP. We fully explain these changes in the Analysis of Comments and 
Changes section that follows.

Analysis of Comments and Changes

    In response to our invitation in the NPP, 12 parties submitted 
comments on the proposed priorities. An analysis of the comments and 
the changes in the priorities since publication of the NPP follows. We 
discuss major issues according to subject.
    Generally, we do not address technical and other minor changes and 
suggested changes we are not authorized to make under the applicable 
statutory authority.

Priority One--Collaborative Research Module Projects

    Comment: One commenter was unclear about the relationship between 
the module projects in Priority One and the multi-site collaborative 
projects in Priority Two.
    Discussion: In Priority One, NIDRR is requiring that the SCIMS 
centers participate in at least one collaborative research module 
project. These modules are designed to encourage collaboration among 
the SCIMS centers during the funding cycle. All centers will 
participate in at least one module project. Centers will determine 
which module projects they wish to participate in once the project 
directors and NIDRR select the module projects at the beginning of the 
funding cycle. NIDRR is recommending that each center set aside up to 
15 percent of its budget for participating in these module projects.
    The Priority Two competition is a separate competition. While only 
SCIMS centers selected for funding under the Priority One competition 
may compete under Priority Two, there is no requirement that the SCIMS 
centers funded under Priority One compete in the Priority Two 
competition.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter asked if NIDRR would clarify that, under 
Priority One, applicants must both propose at least one and participate 
in at least one collaborative module project.
    Discussion: NIDRR agrees that clarification of this requirement 
would be helpful to applicants.
    Change: The priority has been changed to clarify that, to meet the 
requirements of Priority One, an applicant must propose at least one 
collaborative research module project

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and participate in at least one collaborative research module project.
    Comment: Five commenters raised concerns about the difficulty of 
budgeting for the collaborative research module project required under 
Priority One.
    Discussion: NIDRR acknowledges that additional direction would 
facilitate budgeting and therefore planning for the module projects. 
For planning purposes, we suggest that applicants allot no more than 15 
percent of their budget to the module project.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter asked if the module projects as implemented 
will be held to the actual parameters as presented in the proposal.
    Discussion: The module project proposals of applicants selected for 
funding under Priority One will be reviewed by all project directors 
and key NIDRR staff and projects will be selected for implementation. 
Since these are peer-reviewed projects, it is expected that the 
projects will be implemented as proposed with adjustments as necessary 
to accommodate unexpected contingencies. In accordance with NIDRR 
policy, any substantial changes to project scope must be approved by 
the assigned NIDRR project officer.
    Change: None.
    Comment: Two commenters asked whether the module projects can 
involve non-SCIMS centers.
    Discussion: Participation in the module projects will be limited to 
the funded SCIMS centers.
    Change: The priority has been modified to clarify that 
participation in these module projects is limited to funded SCIMS 
centers.
    Comment: One commenter suggested that NIDRR require that some of 
the Priority One collaborative research module projects focus on SCI 
outcome measures.
    Discussion: While NIDRR agrees that outcome measures might be an 
excellent subject for the Priority One module projects, it does not 
believe that all applicants should be required to propose module 
projects that focus only on outcomes. Nothing in the priority precludes 
an applicant from suggesting such a research focus, however. The peer 
review process will evaluate the merits of the proposals.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter suggested that NIDRR clarify whether SCIMS 
centers funded under Priority One will be able to participate in more 
than one collaborative research module project.
    Discussion: NIDRR does not stipulate that applicants participate in 
only one module project. The number and subject of the modules selected 
for implementation will not be known, however, until after the first 
Project Directors' meeting. Each successful applicant will work with 
NIDRR staff to determine if allocations of staffing and budget allow 
participation in more than one module project.
    Change: None.
    Comment: Two commenters asked NIDRR to clarify whether the Priority 
One module projects must focus on intervention studies or whether these 
module projects can truly be innovative and pilot in nature.
    Discussion: While NIDRR supports the idea that the module projects 
can be innovative and pilot in nature, NIDRR is not prescribing that 
only these types of projects can be proposed under Priority One. NIDRR 
suggests that applicants clearly identify the research question the 
project will address, its importance, and its proposed outcomes and 
clarify the nature of the project so that reviewers can determine 
whether the scope and format of the project is appropriate.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter asked whether applicants are expected to 
establish collaborative relationships with other centers prior to 
submitting their applications and whether applicants can propose the 
same module projects in their applications.
    Discussion: NIDRR is not requiring applicants to identify or to 
have established relationships with their collaborators when they 
submit their applications. As stated in the priority, the decisions 
regarding selection of module projects for implementation will be made 
by the project directors of the newly awarded centers in conjunction 
with NIDRR staff. Each center will then be required to participate in 
at least one of these projects. There is nothing to prohibit applicants 
under Priority One from proposing the same module project.
    Change: None.

Priority One--SCIMS Database

    Comment: Several commenters asked that NIDRR clarify whether the 
requirement that at least 30 subjects be enrolled per year applies to 
the longitudinal portion of the database (FORM I) or the registry 
portion of the database.
    Discussion: This requirement is for full enrollment into the 
longitudinal portion of the database. Thus, these subjects must be 
enrolled with the expectation that they will be followed long-term.
    Change: The priority has been changed to reflect this requirement.
    Comment: One commenter recommended that NIDRR increase the required 
number of subjects enrolled in the longitudinal database to 40 instead 
of 30 subjects.
    Discussion: This is the first time that NIDRR has specified a 
minimum number of subjects for database enrollment. NIDRR based the 
requirement on an analysis of historical trends within the database. At 
the present time, SCIMS centers are required to enroll all eligible 
subjects into the database, and many centers enroll more than 30 
subjects. While nothing in the priority precludes an applicant from 
enrolling more than 30 subjects, NIDRR does not believe that all 
applicants should be required to enroll at least 40.
    Change: None.
    Comment: Two commenters asked NIDRR whether there will be 
differential funding for centers with markedly different workloads for 
follow-up data collection associated with the longitudinal database. 
This differential workload occurs when existing centers have large 
numbers of enrolled subjects in the longitudinal database compared to 
new centers with none.
    Discussion: NIDRR agrees that there should be differential funding 
associated with the longitudinal database portion of the priority. 
Information on these funding level differences will be provided in any 
notice we publish in the Federal Register inviting applications for 
funding under Priority One.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter recommended that there be a maximum number 
of enrollees per year in order to relieve the burden on centers that 
are successful in enrolling large numbers of subjects.
    Discussion: NIDRR agrees that this is an issue and plans to work 
with the project directors and others to determine a scientific basis 
for limiting enrollment in the database. For the purpose of this 
priority, however, it is recommended that centers budget for enrolling 
all eligible subjects into the database, with appropriate adjustment, 
based on previous experience, for refusals to participate.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter asked whether subjects enrolled into the 
longitudinal database must have a traumatic etiology or could have a 
nontraumatic etiology.
    Discussion: The inclusion criteria specify that subjects entered 
into the database must have a clinically

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discernible degree of neurologic impairment caused by a traumatic 
event.
    Change: None.

Priority One--Site-Specific Research Projects

    Comment: One commenter expressed concern that the requirement to 
conduct no more than one site-specific project would force existing 
SCIMS centers that receive funding under this priority to interrupt or 
eliminate specific ongoing research projects. The concern is that 
research that is ongoing and is designed to be carried out in a step-
wise fashion over multiple funding cycles will not be continued because 
of the limit on site-specific projects.
    Discussion: NIDRR agrees that this is a valid concern. The decision 
to limit the number of projects reflects a concern that SCIMS centers 
devote sufficient resources to site-specific research to allow rigorous 
methods to be used and to conduct research that is robust enough to 
engender confidence in the results.
    Change: NIDRR will balance these concerns by allowing applicants to 
propose no more than two site-specific research projects and will allow 
the peer review process to judge the scientific merit of the proposals 
and the feasibility of the implementation of up to two projects. NIDRR 
will not accept applications that propose more than two site-specific 
projects. The priority has been changed to reflect the requirement 
regarding the maximum number of site-specific projects that an 
applicant may propose.
    Comment: One commenter asked NIDRR to clarify whether there will be 
weighting of priorities so that preference is given to intervention 
studies as the subject of the site-specific research project.
    Discussion: NIDRR is encouraging applicants to test innovative 
approaches to treatment and evaluation of SCI outcomes. This focus on 
treatment supports an emphasis on interventions research; however, 
NIDRR suggests that applicants could consider the ways in which 
prognostic or diagnostic research can support the development of 
interventions that improve outcomes for persons with SCI. Nothing in 
the priority would preclude an applicant from suggesting such an 
approach. The peer review process will evaluate merits of the 
proposals.
    Change: This priority has been changed to clarify the focus on 
rehabilitation interventions.

Priority One--General

    Comment: One commenter suggested that NIDRR require that projects 
submitted under Priority One focus on the unique issues, including 
health disparities, faced by persons with SCI from minority backgrounds 
who live in rural areas.
    Discussion: NIDRR agrees that persons with SCI who live in rural 
areas may experience unique issues, including significant health 
disparities. NIDRR also agrees that these disparities may be 
significant for individuals from minority populations. Nothing in the 
priority precludes an applicant from addressing these issues. However, 
NIDRR does not believe that all SCIMS centers should be required to 
address these problems. The peer review process will evaluate the 
merits of the proposals.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter suggested that NIDRR require that SCIMS 
centers have the technology and capacity to lead clinical trials.
    Discussion: NIDRR agrees that SCIMS centers must have the capacity 
to conduct rigorous research. However, NIDRR does not believe that all 
centers should be required to demonstrate their ability to lead 
clinical trials.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter expressed concern regarding requirements for 
dissemination activities within the SCIMS program.
    Discussion: On February 7, 2006, NIDRR published a combined notice 
of proposed priorities, which included a priority for the funding of a 
Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) (71 FR 6317) that 
will focus on cross-model system dissemination efforts. Applicants are 
encouraged to review this priority and determine and discuss in their 
applications what resources will be required to provide information to 
this center.
    Change: None.
    Comment: Several commenters noted that the criteria for inclusion 
in the model SCI systems database, which were described in the 
background section of the proposed priority, were overly inclusive and 
did not reflect recent changes to the inclusion criteria.
    Discussion: NIDRR acknowledges that there has been recent 
tightening of the inclusion criteria to require that subjects enrolled 
into the database must complete inpatient acute rehabilitation at the 
Model SCI system, not just receive care at one component of the model 
system of care. These criteria are now as follows:
    Eligible subjects must--
    (a) Complete inpatient acute rehabilitation at the model SCI 
system, expire during Model SCI system hospitalization, or achieve 
complete recovery or minimal deficit status at the time of discharge 
from the model SCI system; (b) Be treated at a Model SCI system within 
one year of the injury; (c) Sign a consent form and the Health 
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) 
authorization; (d) Reside in a geographic catchment area of the model 
system at the time of the injury; and (e) Be a U.S. citizen.
    Change: None.

Priority Two--General

    Comment: Two commenters stated that the timeline for making the 
awards may not allow sufficient time for applicants to develop 
successful proposals for collaborative projects for the Priority Two 
competition.
    Discussion: NIDRR recognizes that the timeline for these 
competitions is tight. NIDRR, however, believes that there is 
sufficient time to conduct these competitions in the remainder of this 
fiscal year, and anticipates that applicants for the Priority Two 
competition will have 60 days to submit their applications following 
notification of their success in the Priority One competition. Because 
the priorities for these two competitions are being announced 
simultaneously, potential applicants will have many months to consider 
their applications for Priority Two.
    Change: None.
    Comment: One commenter urged NIDRR to require that applicants for 
funding under Priority Two recognize clinical practice guidelines 
(CPGs) in formulating their proposals.
    Discussion: While NIDRR agrees that CPGs may be proposed for 
research under Priority Two, NIDRR does not believe that all applicants 
should be required to take this approach. Nothing in the priority 
precludes an applicant from suggesting such an approach. The peer 
review process will evaluate merits of the proposals.
    Change: None.
    Comment: None.
    Discussion: The NPP specified in paragraph 4 of Priority Two that 
an applicant must not request an amount in excess of $800,000 to cover 
startup costs. Upon internal review we are removing this dollar amount 
to provide applicants with greater flexibility to estimate their 
startup costs.
    Change: We have modified paragraph 4 in Priority Two to remove the 
reference to the $800,000 cap on startup costs.

    Note: This notice does not solicit applications. In any year in 
which we choose

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to use these final priorities and selection criterion, we invite 
applications through a notice in the Federal Register. When inviting 
applications we designate the priority as absolute, competitive 
preference, or invitational. The effect of each type of priority 
follows:
    Absolute priority: Under an absolute priority, we consider only 
applications that meet the priority (34 CFR 75.105(c)(3)).

    Competitive preference priority: Under a competitive preference 
priority, we give competitive preference to an application by either 
(1) awarding additional points, depending on how well or the extent 
to which the application meets the competitive priority (34 CFR 
75.105(c)(2)(i)); or (2) selecting an application that meets the 
competitive priority over an application of comparable merit that 
does not meet the priority (34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(ii)).
    Invitational priority: Under an invitational priority, we are 
particularly interested in applications that meet the invitational 
priority. However, we do not give an application that meets the 
invitational priority a competitive or absolute preference over 
other applications (34 CFR 75.105(c)(1)).

    Note: This notice of final priorities is in concert with 
President George W. Bush's New Freedom Initiative (NFI) and NIDRR's 
Final Long-Range Plan for FY 2005-2009 (Plan). The NFI can be 
accessed on the Internet at the following site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/newfreedom.


    The Plan, which was published in the Federal Register on February 
15, 2006 (71 FR 8166), can be accessed on the Internet at the following 
site: http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/nidrr/policy.html.

    Through the implementation of the NFI and the Plan, NIDRR seeks 
to--(1) Improve the quality and utility of disability and 
rehabilitation research; (2) Foster an exchange of expertise, 
information, and training to facilitate the advancement of knowledge 
and understanding of the unique needs of traditionally underserved 
populations; (3) Determine best strategies and programs to improve 
rehabilitation outcomes for underserved populations; (4) Identify 
research gaps; (5) Identify mechanisms of integrating research and 
practice; and (6) Disseminate findings.

Priorities

Priorities and Selection Criterion

    In accordance with section 204(b)(4) of the Act, and 34 CFR part 
359, Priority One will provide for the funding of SCIMS centers that 
will build upon the work of the currently-funded SCIMS centers, to 
provide comprehensive rehabilitation services to individuals with SCI 
and conduct spinal cord research, including clinical research and the 
analysis of standardized data in collaboration with other related 
projects.
    Priority Two, authorized under section 204(a) of the Act and 34 CFR 
part 350, will provide for the funding of DRRPs to conduct multi-site 
research that contributes to evidence-based rehabilitation 
interventions and clinical practice guidelines that improve the lives 
of individuals with SCI. These projects will serve the overall purpose 
of the DRRP program, which is to plan and conduct research, 
demonstration projects, training, and related activities to develop 
methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the 
full inclusion and integration into society, employment, independent 
living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of 
individuals with disabilities, especially individuals with the most 
severe disabilities, and to improve the effectiveness of services 
authorized under the Act. DRRPs carry out one or more of the following 
types of activities, as specified in 34 CFR 350.13 through 350.19: 
research, development, demonstration, training, dissemination, 
utilization, and technical assistance.
    The Department is interested in ensuring that grantees use rigorous 
methods to carry out multi-site research conducted under Priority Two. 
Therefore, we are establishing an additional selection criterion to 
address methods for carrying out multi-site research collaboration for 
Priority Two. This criterion is intended to emphasize the importance of 
multi-site research collaboration.
    To be eligible under Priority Two, an applicant must have received 
a grant under Priority One. The Department intends to announce the 
competition for Priority Two awards after selecting the grantees from 
the Priority One competition. Only successful applicants from the 
Priority One competition will be eligible to apply for awards under the 
Priority Two competition.

Priority One--SCIMS Centers

    The Assistant Secretary establishes a priority for the funding of 
Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) centers to conduct research 
that contributes to evidence-based rehabilitation interventions and 
clinical and practice guidelines that improve the lives of individuals 
with spinal cord injury (SCI). Each SCIMS center must--
    1. Contribute to continued assessment of long-term outcomes of SCI 
by enrolling at least 30 subjects per year into the longitudinal 
portion of the SCIMS database, following established protocols for the 
collection of enrollment and follow-up data on subjects;
    2. Contribute to improved outcomes for persons with SCI by 
proposing at least one collaborative research module project and 
participating in at least one collaborative research module project, 
which may range from pilot research to more extensive studies. (At the 
beginning of the funding cycle, the SCI model systems directors, in 
conjunction with NIDRR, will select specific modules for implementation 
from the approved applications.) Participation in these module projects 
is limited to funded SCIMS centers; and
    3. Contribute to improved long-term outcomes of individuals with 
SCI by conducting no more than two site-specific research projects to 
test innovative approaches that contribute to rehabilitation 
interventions and evaluating SCI outcomes in accordance with the focus 
areas identified in NIDRR's Final Long-Range Plan for FY 2005-2009 
(Plan). Applicants who propose more than two site-specific projects 
will be disqualified.
    In carrying out these activities, applicants may select from the 
following research domains related to specific areas of the Plan: 
Health and function, employment, participation and community living, 
and technology for access and function.
    In addition, applicants must address the following requirements:
     Provide a multidisciplinary system of rehabilitation care 
specifically designed to meet the needs of individuals with SCI. The 
system must encompass a continuum of care, including emergency medical 
services, acute care services, acute medical rehabilitation services, 
and post-acute services.
     Address the needs of people with disabilities including 
individuals from traditionally underserved populations.
     Coordinate with the NIDRR-funded Model Systems Knowledge 
Translation Center to provide scientific results and information for 
dissemination to clinical and consumer audiences.
     Ensure participation of individuals with disabilities in 
all aspects of SCIMS research.

Priority Two--Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) Multi-Site 
Research Projects--and Selection Criterion for SCIMS Multi-Site 
Research Projects Priority

    The Assistant Secretary establishes a priority for the funding of 
Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) multi-site research projects 
to conduct research that contributes to evidence-based rehabilitation 
interventions and clinical practice guidelines that improve

[[Page 9892]]

the lives of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).
    To be eligible under this priority, an applicant must have received 
a grant under the SCIMS Centers priority. Following completion of a 
competition under the SCIMS Centers priority, the Department will 
invite successful applicants under that competition to apply for 
funding as a lead center under this SCIMS Multi-Site Research Projects 
priority.
    Each SCIMS multi-site research project must--
    1. Ensure utilization of SCIMS capacity by collaborating with three 
or more of the NIDRR-funded SCIMS centers (for a minimum of four SCIMS 
sites). Applicants may propose to include other SCI research sites that 
are not participating in a NIDRR-funded program in their multi-site 
research projects;
    2. Contribute to improved long-term outcomes of individuals with 
SCI by conducting multi-site research on questions of significance to 
SCI rehabilitation, using clearly identified research designs. The 
research must focus on one or more specific domains identified in 
NIDRR's Final Long-Range Plan for FY 2005-2009 (Plan), including health 
and function, participation and community living, technology, and 
employment, and ensure that the research study has appropriate research 
hypotheses and methods to generate reliable and valid findings;
    3. Demonstrate the capacity to carry out multi-site research 
projects, including the ability to coordinate research among centers; 
maintain data quality; and adhere to research protocols, 
confidentiality requirements, and data safety requirements; and
    4. Specify startup activities that will be required to mount the 
proposed multi-site research project, including infrastructure 
requirements and measurement tools. Applicants must specify in their 
applications the amount requested to cover these startup costs.
    In addition, applicants must address the following requirements:
     Address the needs of people with disabilities, including 
individuals from traditionally underserved populations.
     Coordinate with the NIDRR-funded Model Systems Knowledge 
Translation Center by providing scientific results and information for 
dissemination to clinical and consumer audiences.
     Ensure participation of individuals with disabilities in 
all aspects of model systems research.

Selection Criterion

    In accordance with the provisions of 34 CFR 350.53 and 350.54 and 
in addition to the selection criteria specified in those sections, the 
Secretary will consider the following factor in evaluating applications 
submitted under the SCIMS Multi-Site Research Projects priority:
    The extent to which the applicant clearly documents its capacity to 
manage multi-site research projects, including administrative 
capabilities, experience with management of multi-site research 
protocols, and demonstrated ability to maintain standards for quality 
and confidentiality of data gathered from multiple sites.

Executive Order 12866

    This notice of final priorities has been reviewed in accordance 
with Executive Order 12866. Under the terms of the order, we have 
assessed the potential costs and benefits of this regulatory action.
    The potential costs associated with the notice of final priorities 
are those resulting from statutory requirements and those we have 
determined as necessary for administering these programs effectively 
and efficiently.
    In assessing the potential costs and benefits--both quantitative 
and qualitative--of this notice of final priorities, we have determined 
that the benefits of the final priorities justify the costs.
    Summary of potential costs and benefits:
    The potential costs associated with these final priorities are 
minimal while the benefits are significant.
    The benefits of the SCIMS and DRRP programs have been well 
established over the years in that similar projects have been completed 
successfully. These final priorities will generate new knowledge and 
technologies through research, development, dissemination, utilization, 
and technical assistance projects.
    Another benefit of these final priorities are that the 
establishment of new SCIMS centers and the DRRPs conducting SCIMS 
multi-site research projects will support the President's NFI and will 
improve the lives of persons with disabilities. These centers and DRRPs 
will generate, disseminate, and promote the use of new information that 
will improve the options for individuals with disabilities to perform 
regular activities in the community.
    Applicable Program Regulations: 34 CFR parts 350 and 359.

Electronic Access to This Document

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Education documents published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe 
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    Note: The official version of this document is the document 
published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the 
official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal 
Regulations is available on GPO Access at: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/nara/index.html
.



(Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number 84.133N, Model Spinal 
Cord Injury Centers and 84.133A, Disability Rehabilitation Research 
Projects).

    Program Authority: 29 U.S.C. 760, 764(a), and 764(b)(4).

    Dated: February 22, 2006.
John H. Hager,
Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.
[FR Doc. 06-1796 Filed 2-24-06; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4000-01-P