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No Child Left Behind: A Desktop Reference
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Native Hawaiian Education (VII-B)

Purpose

The Education of Native Hawaiians program develops innovative educational programs to assist native Hawaiians, provides direction and guidance to appropriate federal, state, and local agencies to focus resources on native Hawaiian education, provides periodic assessment and data collection, and encourages the maximum participation of native Hawaiians in planning and managing native Hawaiian education programs.

This program was enacted because of native Hawaiians' unique status as the indigenous people of a once sovereign nation to whom the United States has established a trust relationship. Native Hawaiian students continue to begin school lagging behind other students in terms of readiness factors such as vocabulary test scores. Native Hawaiian students also continue to score below national norms on standardized education achievement tests at all grade levels. Both public and private schools continue to show a pattern of lower percentages of native Hawaiian students in the uppermost achievement levels and in gifted and talented programs. Native Hawaiian students are often over represented among students qualifying for special education programs provided to students with learning disabilities, mild mental retardation, emotional impairment, other such disabilities, and are more likely to be retained in grade level and to be excessively absent in secondary school. Additionally, Native Hawaiians are underrepresented in institutions of higher education and among adults who have completed four or more years of college.

WHAT'S NEW--The No Child Left Behind Act

Reduces Bureaucracy and Increases Flexibility

  • Combines six programs into one comprehensive grant program. Consolidated programs include: The Native Hawaiian Family-Based Education Centers; the Native Hawaiian Curriculum Development, Teacher Training and Recruitment Program; the Native Hawaiian Gifted and Talented Program; the Native Hawaiian Higher Education Program; the Native Hawaiian Special Education Program, and the Native Hawaiian Community-Based Education Learning Centers.

Focuses on What Works

  • Sets a priority for reading. One of four priorities that the U.S. Department of Education will consider in awarding grants are projects designed to address beginning reading and literacy among students in kindergarten through third grade. This emphasis is important for native Hawaiian students because of their lower standardized assessment test scores.
  • Sets other priorities. In awarding grants, the U.S. Department of Education also gives a priority to projects that are designed to address the needs of at-risk children and youths; needs in fields or disciplines in which native Hawaiians are underemployed; and the use of the Hawaiian language in instruction.

Other Major New Requirements

Appoints members of the Native Hawaiian Education Council. The secretary of education is required to appoint members of the Native Hawaiian Education Council based on recommendations from the native Hawaiian community. The council may make direct grants to coordinate the educational and related services and programs available to native Hawaiians.

How It Works

This program consists of two separate activities: The Native Hawaiian Education Council (and grants) and the Native Hawaiian Education programs.

Members of the Education Council are appointed by the secretary of education based on recommendations received from the native Hawaiian community. The U.S. Department of Education makes a direct grant to the council. The Department also can make direct grants to, or enter into contracts with, native Hawaiian educational organizations; native Hawaiian community-based organizations; public and private nonprofit organizations, agencies, and institutions with experience in developing or operating native Hawaiian programs or programs of instruction in the native Hawaiian language; and consortia of the organizations, agencies, and institutions, to carry out programs that meet the purposes of this program. The Department also helps establish native Hawaiian education island councils on seven of the Hawaiian Islands.

Key Requirements

Native Hawaiian Education Council Grant. The Department will make a direct grant to the Education Council to carry out the following activities:

  • Coordinate the educational and related services and programs available to native Hawaiians, including those supported under Title VII-B.
  • Assess the extent to which such services and programs meet the needs of native Hawaiians, and collect data on Native Hawaiian education.
  • Provide direction and guidance by issuing reports and recommendations to appropriate federal, state, and local agencies in order to focus and improve the use of resources, including resources made available under Title VII-B, relating to native Hawaiian education, and serve, where appropriate, in an advisory capacity.
  • Make direct grants, if such grants enable the Education Council to carry out its duties.

No later than four years after the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act, the secretary of education shall prepare and submit to Congress a report that summarizes the annual reports of the Education Council, describes the allocation and use of funds, and contains recommendations for changes in federal, state, and local policy to advance the purposes of this program.

Native Hawaiian Education programs. In awarding grants or contracts, the U.S. Department of Education will give priority to projects that are designed to address:
  • beginning reading and literacy among students in kindergarten through third grade;
  • the needs of at-risk children and youths;
  • needs in fields or disciplines in which native Hawaiians are underemployed; and
  • the use of the Hawaiian language in instruction.

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Last Modified: 09/14/2007