Administrators WORK WITH PARENTS & THE COMMUNITY
Statistical Resources for Nonpublic Schools
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Other Notable Surveys and Studies

Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K)

Overview:

The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K) is an ongoing nationally representative study that focuses on children's early school experiences beginning with kindergarten and following children through eighth grade. The ECLS-K provides descriptive information on children's status at entry to school, their transition into school, and their progression and performance through eighth grade. The longitudinal nature of the ECLS-K data enables researchers to study how a wide range of family, school, community, and individual variables associate with performance in school. In part, this research is in response to an increased public awareness of the importance of children's early experiences to their later school success.

The study is representative of children who were enrolled in kindergarten during the 1998-99 school year, and was freshened to be representative of children enrolled in first grade in the spring of 2000. During the kindergarten year (1998-99), the study is also representative of kindergarten teachers and schools that offer kindergarten programs. The children in ECLS-K come from both public and private schools and attended both full-day and part-day kindergarten programs. They come from diverse socioeconomic and racial/ethnic backgrounds. Also participating in the study are the children's parents, teachers, and schools.

Information is collected in the fall and the spring of kindergarten (1998-99), the fall and spring of first grade (1999-2000), and the spring of 3rd (2002), 5th (2004) and 8th (2007) grades.

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Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002)

Overview:

The Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) is designed to monitor the transition of a national sample of young people as they progress from tenth grade through high school and on to postsecondary education and/or the world of work. The national sample includes students from public and private schools.

ELS:2002 obtains information not just from students and their school records, but also from students' parents, their teachers, and the administrators (principal and library media center director) of their schools. Using this longitudinal, multilevel information, the base year (2002) and first follow-up (2004) of ELS:2002 will help researchers and policy makers to explore and better understand such issues as the importance of home background and parental aspirations for their child's success; the influence of different curriculum paths and special programs; the effectiveness of different high schools, and whether their effectiveness varies with their size, organization, climate or ethos, curriculum, academic press, or other characteristics. These data will facilitate understanding of the impact of various instructional methods and curriculum content and exposure in bringing about educational growth and achievement.

In the first year of data collection (the 2002 base year) ELS:2002 measured students' tested achievement and obtained information about their attitudes and experiences. These same students were surveyed and tested again, two years later in 2004 to measure their achievement gains in mathematics, as well as changes in their status, such as transfer to another high school, early completion of high school, or leaving high school before graduation. The third round of data collection is taking place in 2006 in areas such as high school completion, enrollment in postsecondary education, employment, and family formation. Cohort members will be followed a number of years thereafter so that later outcomes, such as their persistence and attainment in higher education, or their transition into the labor market, can be understood in terms of their earlier aspirations, achievement, and high school experiences.

ELS:2002 is the fourth in a series of school-based longitudinal studies. The studies preceding it are the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS-72), High School and Beyond (HS&B), and the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88; see below). All of these studies deal with the transition of American youth from secondary schooling to subsequent education and work roles. ELS:2002 must be seen in the context of these prior NCES high school studies.

Notable Publications:

Reference:

Current Population Survey (CPS): October Supplement

Overview:

The Current Population Survey (CPS) is a monthly household survey conducted by the Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics to provide information about employment, unemployment, and other characteristics of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. CPS is a probability sample survey of households. Since the late 1960s, NCES has funded a supplement for CPS. The October Supplement routinely gathers data on school enrollment and educational attainment for elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education in any type of public, parochial, or other private school in the regular school system. Related data are also collected about preschooling and the general adult population. In addition, NCES regularly funds additional items on education-related topics such as language proficiency, disabilities, computer use and access, student mobility, and private school tuition.

Notable Publications:

Issues Related to Estimating the Home-Schooled Population in the United States with National Household Survey Data (9.2000)

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Last Modified: 06/01/2009