Administrators WORK WITH PARENTS & THE COMMUNITY
Innovations in Education: Successful Magnet High Schools
September 2008
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Notes

1 Christine Rossell, "Magnet Schools: No Longer Famous, But Still Intact," Education Next 4, no. 2 (2005): 44-49.
Donald Waldrip, "A Brief History of Magnet Schools" (Washington, D.C.: Magnet Schools of America, 2003), http://www.magnet.edu (accessed on July 8, 2008).

2 Rolf K. Blank, Roger E. Levine, and Lauri Steel, "After 15 Years: Magnet Schools in Urban Education," in Who Chooses? Who Loses? ed. by Bruce Fuller and Richard F. Ellmore with Gary Orfield (New York: Teachers College Press, 1996), 157.

3 Magnet Schools of America, Directory of Public Magnet and Theme-Based Schools (2007), https://www.magnet.edu/modules/content/index.php?id=106 (accessed July 8, 2008).

4 Magnet Schools of America, Alerts: "-Magnet Schools of America, 2008 Legislative Advocacy Leadership: Key Facts and Legislative Priority Issues" (Feb. 21, 2008), http://www.magnet.edu/modules/news/article.php?storyid=25 (accessed April 23, 2008).

5 Donald Waldrip, "A Brief History of Magnet Schools" (Washington, D.C.: Magnet Schools of America, 2003), http://www.magnet.edu (accessed July 8, 2008).

6 Margaret Weertz, "The Benefits of Theme Schools," Educational Leadership 59, no. 7 (April 2002): 68-71.

7 Mortimer J. Adler, The Paideia Proposal: An Educational Manifesto (New York: Macmillan, 1982). See also discussion on p. 38 and note 9.

8 The 1996 Connecticut Supreme Court case, Sheff v. O'Neill, resulted in the creation of a series of magnet schools as part of a strategy for reducing minority isolation and segregation in public schools in the Hartford area. This landmark decision, which determined that racially and socioeconomically isolated students in Hartford public schools were receiving inferior and inadequate educational opportunities mandated desegregation efforts for the urban school system and led to the establishment of eight interdistrict magnet schools.

9 National Paideia Center, Paideia Stories: Successful Schools in Practice (Chapel Hill, N.C.: National Paideia Center, 2002), p. 36, http://www.-paideia.org/content.php/results/resmain.htm (accessed April 23, 2008).

10 Thomas D. Cook et al., "The Development of Occupational Aspirations and Expectations Among Inner-City Boys," Child Development 67, no. 6 (2006): 3368-3385.
Jens Ludwig, "Information and Inner City Educational Attainment," Economics of Education Review 18, Issue 1 (February 1999): 17-30.
Vincent J. Roscigno, Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, and Martha L. Crowley, "Education and the Inequalities of Place," Social Forces 84, no. 4 (June 2006): 2121-2145, http://www.muse.jhu.edu/login?uri=/journals/social_forces/v084/84.4roscigno.html (accessed April 23, 2008).

11 John E. Chubb and Terry M. Moe, Politics, Markets and America's Schools (Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution, 1990).

12 In 2002-03, 71 percent of public high schools offered at least one dual-credit course. See Michael Planty, Stephen Provasnik, and Bruce Daniel, High School Coursetaking: Findings from the Condition of Education, NCES2007-065 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, 2007), p. 5, http://www.nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2007065 (accessed July 8, 2008).

13 Achieve, Inc., Closing the Expectations Gap 2007 (Washington, D.C.: Achieve, Inc., 2007), http://www.achieve.org/files/50-state-07-Final.pdf (accessed April 23, 2008).
Jennifer Dounay, "Alignment of High School Graduation Requirements and State-Set College Admissions Requirements" in State Notes: High School—Transitions to Postsecondary (Denver: Education Commission of the States, 2006). http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/68/60/6860.pdf (accessed Sept. 12, 2008).

14 Between 1982 and 2004, the average number of course credits accrued by high school graduates increased from 21.7 to 25.8 credits. See Michael Planty, Stephen Provasnik, and William Hussar, The Condition of Education 2007, NCES2007-064 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, 2007), p. 15, http://www.nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2007064 (accessed July 8, 2008).

15 ACT and the Education Trust, On Course for Success: A Close Look at Selected Courses That Prepare All Students for College (Iowa City, Iowa: ACT, 2004). This study researched 10 high-achieving, high-poverty, high-minority high schools to answer the question: "What are the components of high school courses that prepare students for successful entry into postsecondary education without the need for remediation?" The study isolates four major characteristics shared by these high-performing high schools that contribute to students' future success both in work and in college: high-level, college-oriented material in core courses; qualified, experienced teachers; teaching that is flexible and responsive to students; and tutorial support.

16 As cited in Daniel P. Mayer et al., Monitoring School Quality: An Indicators Report, NCES 20001-030 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, December 2000), p. v, http://www.nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2001030 (accessed April 23, 2008).

17 Michael Planty, Stephen Provasnik, and Bruce Daniel, Special Analysis 2007: High School Coursetaking (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, 2007), http://www.nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2007/analysis/sa04.asp (accessed July 8, 2008).

18 Clifford Adelman, Answers in the Tool Box: Academic Intensity, Attendance Patterns, and Bachelor's Degree Attainment (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, 1999), http://www.ed.gov/pubs/Toolbox/toolbox.html (accessed April 23, 2008).

19 Laura Horn and Anne-Marie Nu�ez, Mapping the Road to College: First-Generation Students' Math Track, Planning Strategies, and Context of Support, NCES 2000-153 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, 2000), http://www.nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/-pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2000153 (accessed July 8, 2008).

20 Daniel P. Mayer, John E. Mullens, and Mary T. Moore, Monitoring School Quality: An Indicators Report, NCES 2001-030 (-Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education S-ciences, National Center for Education Statistics, 2000), p. I, http://www.nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2001030 (accessed July 8, 2008).

21 Ibid.

22 "Family Income and Higher Education Opportunity 1970 to 2003," Postsecondary Education Opportunity 156 (June 2005) as cited in Katy Haycock, "Courageous Choices: Tackling the Tough Issues to Raise Student Achievement and Close Gaps" (PowerPoint presentation) (Washington, D.C.: The Education Trust, Inc., 2007), http://www2.edtrust.org/NR/rdonlyres/A73340DD-62F1-45EE-BB3F-F1C048EBBDE3/0/CONF2K7-ThursdayPlenaryHaycock.ppt (accessed July 8, 2008).

23 Ibid.

24 Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act provides financial assistance to schools with large numbers of children from low-income families.

25 Florida Department of Education Media Room, "Florida Shows Largest Increase in Student Mastery of Advanced Placement Courses" (press release, Jan. 25, 2005), http:///www.fldoe.org/news/2005/2005_01_25-2.asp (accessed April 23, 2008).

26 Nikola Filby, "Approach to Methodological Rigor in the Innovation Guides," working paper, WestEd, San Francisco, Calif., 2006.


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