U.S. Department of Education: Promoting Educational Excellence for all Americans

Table 2. Most Recently Available Per-pupil Facilities Aid Information for All Jurisdictions Offering Such Assistance

Jurisdiction Per-pupil Facilities Aida Year Facilities Aid Startedb Usable for Non-capital Costsc
Arizona $1,445 (elementary and middle school) and $1,684 (high school)g 1994 Y
California Up to $750 if state budget allowsh (in FY 07, average was $283) 2001 N
Colorado $292 1994 N
Florida $374 (elementary school), $429 (middle school), and $567 (high school)j 1998 N
Hawaii $686l   N
Massachusetts $849 2005 Y
Minnesota $1,200 maximumn   N
New Mexico $700 on averageo 2004 N
Pennsylvania $160 (elementary school), $220 (high school), $270 (vocational and technical schools)p 2001 N
Utah   2003 N
Washington, D.C. $3,109 1998 Y


Usable for Purchase, Including Loan Paymentsd Per-pupil Operating Revenue (in $ and as a percentage of per-student funding for traditional public schools)e Operating Revenue Plus Facilities Aidf
Y $6,075 / 76% $7,462 (elementary and middle school) and $7,692 (high school)
N $7,034 / 69% $7,784
Yi $6,500 / 70% $6,700
Yk $6,552 / 69% $6,926 (elementary school), $6,981 (middle school), and $7,119 (high school)
Ym $8,000 / 54% $8,686
Y $10,107 / 68% $10,918
N $10,302 / 94% $11,502 (for schools opened in 2003-present) and $11,802 (for earlier schools)
N $8,000 / 85% $8,600
Nq $7,802 / 60% $7,962 (elementary school), $8,022 (high school), $8,072 (vocational and technical schools)
Yr $4,907 / 72%  
Y $11,154 / 61% $14,263

Note: Data reported in this table are from multiple school years (i.e., 2006, 2007, 2008), since no single-year data source exists for the information included in this table. The school or fiscal year is included in the individual citations for the data reported in this table. Blank cells indicate no data were found.

Sources: This table includes data from multiple sources. The primary source is the 2007 Charter School Facility Finance Landscape study published by the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC). In cases where data were not available from this LISC report, other extant sources were sought or data were collected directly by the research team through interviews conducted in spring 2008 with charter association staff and state education agency staff. All data in the table are labeled with their source.

aUnless otherwise indicated, data in this column are for school year 2007-08 and are drawn from interviews conducted in spring 2008 with charter association staff and state education agency staff in each state.
b Dates in this column are drawn from LISC's 2007 Charter School Facility Finance Landscape report, except in the case of Massachusetts, whose data were provided in July 2008 by a phone interview respondent.
cData in this column are drawn from LISC's 2007 Charter School Facility Finance Landscape report, as well as from phone interviews conducted for this guide.
d Data in this column are drawn from LISC's 2007 Charter School Facility Finance Landscape report.
ePercentages and dollar amounts in this column were found on the Center for Education Reform (CER) Web site: http://www.edreform.com/charter_schools/funding/chart.htm. The CER data were drawn from fiscal year 2005-06 data on public education finances reported by the U.S. Census Bureau, a 2006 survey of charter schools conducted by CER, and data collected by CER from contacts at state departments of education, charter school associations, and Aspire Consulting. See the Web link listed above for full information on the sources for CER's chart.
f Data in this column are the sums of the per-pupil amounts in column 2 and the operating revenue amounts in column 6.
g See http://www.arizonaea.org/pdfs/politics/briefings/State_Aid_8.29.07.pdf for more information. This is the full amount of the state's "additional assistance."
h Charter schools in which at least 70 percent of the enrollment is eligible for free or reduced-price lunch can receive up to $750 per pupil for up to 75 percent of their total lease costs reimbursed. This grant program has never been fully funded.
i Eligible uses include the construction, demolition, remodeling, financing, and purchase or lease of land, buildings, or facilities for charter schools.
j Data in this column are for fiscal year 2005-06, drawn from LISC's 2007 Charter School Facility Finance Landscape study.
k Funds can be used for the purchase of property; construction; purchase, lease-purchase, or lease of permanent or relocatable facilities; purchase of vehicles for student transportation; and renovation, repair, and/or maintenance of facilities that the school owns or is purchasing through a lease-purchase or long-term lease of 5+ years.
l Data in this column are for fiscal year 2006-07, drawn from LISC's 2007 Charter School Facility Finance Landscape study.
mFunds can be used for lease, rent, and/or building improvements; utilities, emergency generators, maintenance or minor facility repairs; major renovations or improvements that add to the useful life of the facility; and improvements that add capacity to the school's infrastructure for the purpose of improving a virtual education program.
nApproved charters are granted 90 percent of lease costs up to a maximum of $1,200 per pupil.
o Schools are granted varying amounts in accordance with adjustments based on their facility's square footage.
p These amounts, reported in LISC's 2007 Charter School Facility Finance Landscape study, were legislated in 2001 through an amendment to the Pennsylvania Public School Code.
q Lease or rental costs for land, trailers, or modules are not eligible for reimbursement.
rFunds may be used for the purchase, construction, renovation or lease of a facility; leasehold improvements; debt service; or land acquisition.

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Last Modified: 01/27/2009