Skip main navigation.
 U.S. Department of Education: Promoting Educational Excellence for all Americans - Link to ED.gov Home Page
HEA: Student Financial Assistance Policy - FY 2005


CFDA Numbers: 84.007 - Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
84.032 - Federal Family Education Loans
84.033 - Federal Work-Study Program
84.037 - Perkins Loan Cancellations
84.038 - Federal Perkins Loan Program_Federal Capital Contributions
84.063 - Federal Pell Grant Program
84.069 - Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership
84.268 - Federal Direct Student Loans

Program Goal: To help ensure access to high-quality postsecondary education by providing financial aid in the form of grants, loans, and work-study in an efficient, financially sound and customer-responsive manner.

Objective 1 of 2: Ensure that low- and middle-income students will have the same access to postsecondary education that high-income students do.
Indicator 1.1 of 3: Percentage of unmet need: The percentage of unmet need considering all sources of financial aid, especially for low-income students.
 
Measure 1.1.1 of 2: Percentage of Unmet Need for Undergraduates
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
1995
23
 
1996
23
 
1997
22
 
1998
21.20
 
1999
20.80
 
2000
21.20
 
2004
23.70
19.20
2008
 
18.70

Measure 1.1.2 of 2: Percentage of Unmet Need for Low-Income Undergraduates.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Dependent Independent With Kids Independent Without Kids
Dependent Independent With Kids Independent Without Kids
1996
46.30 54.70 52.50
     
1997
44.50 51.60 49
     
1998
42.90 51.10 49
     
1999
41.80 50.20 48.50
     
2000
40.30 59.60 39.30
     
2004
41.50 48.40 42.20
41.10 58.60 44.20
2008
     
40.10 57.60 43.20

Source: National Postsecondary Student Aid Study.
Date Sponsored: 01/31/2005.

Frequency: Other.

Next Data Available: August 2008

Data Validated By: No Formal Verification.

Limitations: NPSAS data are collected only every four years.
 
Explanation: FY 2000 data were revised to reflect recalculation of National Postsecondary Student Aid Study data from (NPSAS:2000). Data from NPSAS 2008 are expected in August 2008 for FY 2008. FY 2004 data exceeded their target value. Beginning in FY 2006, this group of programs is presented individually.
 
Indicator 1.2 of 3: College enrollment rates: Postsecondary education enrollment rates for all students, and the enrollment gap between low- and high-income high school graduates.
 
Measure 1.2.1 of 2: The percentage of high school graduates aged 16-24 enrolling immediately in college - Total
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
1995
61.90
 
1996
65
 
1997
67
 
1998
65.60
 
1999
62.90
 
2000
63.30
 
2001
61.70
 
2002
65.20
63.80
2003
63.90
64.10
2004
 
67
2005
 
67

Measure 1.2.2 of 2: The percentage of high school graduates aged 16-24 enrolling immediately in college by income.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Low High Difference
Low High Difference
1995
41.20 83.40 42.20
     
1996
41.50 78 36.50
     
1997
47.10 82 34.90
     
1998
50.60 77.30 26.70
     
1999
50.90 76 25.10
     
2000
48.50 77.10 26.60
     
2001
47.80 79.80 32
     
2002
51 78.20 27.20
     
2003
52.80 80.10 27.30
50 80 30
2004
     
52 81 29
2005
     
52 81 29

Survey/Assessment: Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System.

Frequency: Annually.

Next Data Available: March 2006

Data Validated By: On-Site Monitoring By ED.

Limitations: Small subgroup sample sizes for low-income students lead to large yearly fluctuations in enrollment rates. Three-year weighted averages are used to smooth out these fluctuations;year-to-year differences should be interpreted with caution.
 
Explanation: The percentage of high school graduates aged 16 through 24 enrolling immediately in college has fluctuated since 1995, with recently available data for 2002 and 2003 indicating an increase in the percentage of high school graduates enrolled. In terms of meeting Departmental targets, results were mixed in 2002 and 2003, with the Department exceeding our target for 2002 and not meeting our target for 2003. This indicator reflects economic conditions, and so the slight fluctuations can be explained in part by changing economic conditions. These economic conditions vary for groups aggregated within the measure-students enrolling in two-year versus four-year institutions, and minority students versus the overall student population. To support increasing access to postsecondary education, the Department continues to simplify and integrate financial aid systems so as to increase the growth in the use of electronic applications and correspondingly decrease the number of paper applications for Federal Financial Aid, with the goal of making access to financial aid easier.
 
Indicator 1.3 of 3: Targeting of Pell Grants: Pell Grant funds will continue to be targeted to those students with the greatest financial need: at least 75 percent of Pell Grant funds will go to students below 150 percent of poverty level.
 
Measure 1.3.1 of 1: The percentage of Pell Grant funds going to students below 150 percent of the poverty line.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
1997
82
 
1998
80
 
1999
78
75
2000
78
75
2001
79
75
2002
78
75
2003
76
75
2004
76
75
2005
 
75

Source: Pell Grant Applicant/Recipient File..
Date Sponsored: 03/30/2004.

Frequency: Annually.

Next Data Available: August 2006

Data Validated By: On-Site Monitoring By ED.
 
Explanation: Increases in the maximum award without other changes in the formulas used to award Pell Grants lowered the percentage of funds going to the neediest students. FY 2004 data exceeded the target value. Beginning in FY 2006, this group of programs is presented individually.
 
Objective 2 of 2: Ensure that more students will persist in postsecondary education and attain degrees and certificates.
Indicator 2.1 of 1: Completion rate: Completion rates for all full-time, degree-seeking students in four-year and less-than-four-year programs; and the gap in completion rates between minority and nonminority students.
 
Measure 2.1.1 of 2: The percentage of full-time degree seeking students completing a four-year degree within 150 percent of the normal time required.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Total Black White Hispanic Difference between Black and White Difference between White and Hispanic
Total
1997
52.50 35.50 55.50 39.10 20 16.40
           
1998
52.60 34.50 55.80 39.10 21.30 16.70
           
1999
53 35.80 56 40.90 20.20 15.10
           
2000
52.40 35.70 55.40 41.50 19.70 13.90
           
2002
54.40 38.20 57.20 44.80 19 12.40
           
2003
54.30 38.50 57.30 43.50 18.80 13.80
54          
2004
           
55          
2005
           
55          

Measure 2.1.2 of 2: The percentage of full-time degree seeking students completing a less than 4-year program within 150% of the normal time required.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Total Black White Hispanic Difference Between Black and White Difference Between White and Hispanic
Total
1997
30.90 22.80 32.60 26.20 9.80 6.40
           
1998
32.20 25.10 33.80 29.90 8.70 3.90
           
1999
34.40 29.50 35.30 32.50 5.80 2.80
           
2000
32.70 26.50 34 30.10 7.50 3.90
           
2002
29.30 23.30 30.70 27 7.40 3.70
           
2003
30.60 26.10 31.70 30.10 5.60 1.60
34          
2004
           
35          
2005
           
35          

Source: Graduation Rate Survey (GRS)

Frequency: Annually.

Next Data Available: March 2006

Data Validated By: On-Site Monitoring By ED.
Data are subject to both Census and NCES validation procedures.

Limitations: Prior to the implementation of the Graduation Rate Survey (GRS), data were voluntarily submitted by institutions representing 87 percent of four-year students and 77 percent of two-year students; effective with school year (SY) 2003-04, data submission was mandatory.
 
Explanation: Previously published FY 2002 and 2003 data show a leveling off of completion rates, remaining relatively constant at 54.4 and 54.3 percent, respectively. The Department received Graduation Rate Survey data for this measure for FY 2001-03 as a single data set. The Department elected to process the most recent policy-relevant information first, so analysis and reporting began with FY 2003 and moved backwards to FY 2002 and then to FY 2001. FY 2001 data are the only previously unpublished data this year. A little over half of all full-time degree-seeking students completed a four-year degree within 150 percent of the normal time required in 2001. Trend data for this measure are consistent with data for FY 2001, indicating small fluctuations but small increases in postsecondary completion from 1997. There were no targets until 2003, when we exceeded our target of 54 percent. FY 2004 data are expected in March 2006. Beginning in FY 2006 this group of programs will be presented individually.
 

Return to table of contents