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ESEA: Ready-to-Learn Television - FY 2005


CFDA Number: 84.295 - Ready-To-Learn Television

Program Goal: The Ready-to-Learn Television Program will enhance the learning strategies of preschool and early elementary children.

Objective 1 of 1: Develop, produce, and distribute high-quality televised educational programming for preschool and early elementary school children.
Indicator 1.1 of 3: Children ages 3-6 years old who view literacy based Ready-to-Learn shows will demonstrate expressive vocabulary skills and emergent literacy skills.
 
Measure 1.1.1 of 2: (a) Percentage of children ages 3-6 years old who viewed literacy based Ready-to-Learn television shows that demonstrate expressive vocabulary skills at or above national norms.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Children Ages 3-6
Children Ages 3-6
2003
28.40
 
2004
40
 
2005
43
40

Measure 1.1.2 of 2: (b) Percentage of children ages 3-6 years old who viewed literacy based Ready-to-Learn television shows that demonstrate emergent literacy skills at or above national norms.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Children Ages 3-6
Children Ages 3-6
2003
54.90
 
2004
75
 
2005
78
40

Source 1: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc,Ready to Learn National Evaluation
References: Woodcock-Munoz Language Survey Normative Update Picture Vocab Test & Woodcock Munoz Letter-Word Identification Test.

Source 2: WestED,PBS Ready-to-Learn Performance Indicator Study of Viewing Effects
References: Proportion of students age equivalent or higher on the Woodcock-Munoz Language Survey Normative Update Picture Vocab Test & Woodcok-Munoz Normative Update Letter-Word Identification Test.

Source 3: Head Start Family & Child Experiences Survey: Longitudinal Findings on Program Performance 3rd Progress Report.
Date Sponsored: 09/30/2003.

Frequency: Annually.

Next Data Available: September 2006
Data were validated by the contractor WestEd and reviewed by staff of PBS Ready To Learn and by Department staff.

Limitations: Data are only being collected on preschool children due to insufficient funds to include elementary school children through third grade. The parents and child educators of all children included in the sample attended Ready-To-Learn workshops.
 
Explanation: We exceeded our 2005 targets for both expressive vocabulary and emergent literacy skills. Baseline data were collected from 3,200 children in a nationally stratified random sample of 40 Head Start classrooms. Twenty-five percent of Head Start children scored at or above national norms in expressive vocabulary skills and emergent literacy skills. Children participating in full-year Head Start programs who score at or above national norms for expressive vocabulary and emergent literacy skills can be expected to increase by approximately 9 percent annually. The 5 percent annual increase is ambitious because, unlike Head Start, Ready-to-Learn services are not ''full year.'' Further, the intervention is just one tool in educators' toolkits and not a full curriculum central to their classroom instruction. Ready-to-Learn services included in this measure have four target populations: children with limited literacy; children with disabilities; rural children; and children whose primary language is not English.
 
Indicator 1.2 of 3: Parents who attend workshops will demonstrate daily reading to their children.
 
Measure 1.2.1 of 1: Percentage of parents who attend workshops that demonstrate daily reading to their children.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Parents
Parents
2003
56.50
 
2004
68
 
2005
48
53

Source 1: Survey (paper & pencil, Internet, telephone) of parent and child educator workshop attendees. WestEd.
Date Sponsored: 07/15/2004.

Source 2: Mathematica- Research Contractor. Data collected from parents in face-to-face interviews..
Date Sponsored: 09/30/2003.

Frequency: Annually.

Next Data Available: September 2006
The contractor Mathematica and reviewed by Department staff.

Limitations: Data collected from 3,200 parents in a nationally stratified random sample of 40 Head Start classrooms are self-reported by parents.
 
Explanation: We did not meet our 2005 target. We found some demographic differences between respondents in 2004 and 2005 that indicate these samples are drawn from two different populations. That is, these two groups could differ in some important ways that were beyond the scope of this survey. Thirty-eight percent of Head Start parents read to their children on a daily basis. In 2005, 89 percent of parents reported reading to their children 2-4 times per week or more frequently while 93 percent did so in 2004.
 
Indicator 1.3 of 3: Percentage of parents and child educators who actively implement the Ready To Learn Triangle (View, Do, Read).
 
Measure 1.3.1 of 1: Percentage of parents and child educators who actively implement the Ready-to-Learn Triangle following attendance at a Ready-to-Learn Workshop.
Year Actual Performance Performance Targets
 
Parents and Child Educators
Parents and Child Educators
2003
43.75
 
2004
61.50
 
2005
 
54

Source 1: Mathematica - Research Contractor. Data collected from parents in face-to-face interviews. Data collected from child educators by phone interviews..
Date Sponsored: 09/30/2003.

Source 2: Survey (pencil & paper, Internet, telephone) of parent and child educator workshop attendees. WestEd.
Date Sponsored: 07/15/2004.

Frequency: Annually.

Next Data Available: September 2006
WestEd and reviewed by staff of PBS Ready To Learn by Department staff.

Limitations: 2005 data are self-reported from 238 parents and 195 educators who attended a Ready To Learn workshop from a random sample of workshops within stations.
 
Explanation: No data were collected for this measure. This is the last year of this cooperative agreement with the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). The measures on outreach will be discontinued in future GPRA reports. The focus of this reporting period was 148 PBS stations and their local outreach through coordinators at the local level using workshops that taught the ''View, Do, Read'' Learning Triangle. Two studies done by Mathematica and West Ed indicated that a change in strategy was needed. A panel of experts recommended that Outreach and Programming be separated in future awards. There are three new awards for 2005-2010 - two awards for Programming and one for Outreach. Future performance measures will focus on the effectiveness of children's television programming. The Outreach grant will shift from a local approach to a national approach with some targeted local activities.
 

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