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Appendix C — Part 1, State Support for Technology in Education
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Frequently motivated by participation in the Goals 2000: Educate America Act, many states have placed technology at the center of their efforts to develop high standards for what students should know and be able to do. Without question, most states have made impressive contributions to upgrading their schools' technology base, but more must be done to realize the president's technology goals. Simply as an illustration of the magnitude, diversity, and scope of ongoing state efforts, the following table outlines current state support for technology in education. This table was developed in the spring of 1996 with the help of the Software Publishers Association.

NOTE: This document includes Alabama through Louisiana. See Appendix C, Part 2, for Maine through Wyoming.


Alabama

Planning:

The Governor's Information Technology Commission was established by Governor James in October 1995. The purpose of the commission is to develop guidelines, policies, and equipment standards for information systems that will be followed by state executive agencies, public schools, and state education agencies.

Services:

The state has put into place a scholarship program that pays partial tuition for teachers willing to take three technology courses as part of their master's degree program.


Alaska

Planning:

Alaska is finalizing its statewide plan for educational technology funded by Goals 2000. The Governor's Telecommunications Information Council has been charged with developing a statewide telecommunications plan. A statewide conference is planned in 1996 to foster cooperation between the Alaska Department of Education, colleges and universities, local and long-distance telephone companies, cable companies, public broadcasters, legislators, and other organizations, and to develop specific recommendations for a statewide plan.


Arizona

Planning:

The Arizona Department of Education established an outline for technology planning in 1990-91. Many school districts have used it as their primary planning guide. The Arizona Educational Telecommunications Cooperative also issued a series of white papers and reports entitled "The Last Mile," which outline telecommunications infrastructure and issues in the state as they relate to K-12 education.

Infrastructure:

Currently, the Arizona Department of Education supports over 3,000 K-12 Internet users via direct and dial-up connections. Further, in an initiative to foster rural school connectivity and technology use, 50 Cisco 2511 routers were distributed, with training and support for connections. More than 600 sites will be connected through this initiative.

Funding:

A legislative appropriation request for $6.8 million is currently pending. The funds are intended to enhance telecommunications and connectivity at each school site in the state.


Arkansas

Planning:

A state technology plan will be considered in the 1997 legislative session. A goal of connecting all school buildings to the Internet by 1998 has been set. A nonprofit organization (Project IMPAC) is helping school districts incorporate microcomputers into the classroom and coordinate technology efforts. The state has set guidelines for Internet usage policies for school districts, and school district technology planning is being coordinated with the Arkansas Department of Education.

Infrastructure:

The Arkansas Public School Network (APSCN) provides Internet services.


California

Planning:

A state plan is already in place, and each of the state's eleven county office of education regions has recently completed plans as well. In January 1996, the state began implementing the California Technology Assistance Project, which allocates funds to each of these regions rather than funding statewide technology programs. By March 1996, the California Education Technology Task Force, composed of over 50 members selected by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin, will prepare an action plan for advancing the use of technology in California schools.

Funding:

In July 1995 the State Board approved $13.4 million for educational technology, which was recommended in the Education Technology Act. Of that, $6.5 million will be allocated through a competitive grant, and the remaining funds will be allocated to existing technology projects. The 1995-96 budget includes a $279 million, one-time block grant for instructional materials, deferred maintenance, technology, and other non-recurring costs. The 1995-96 budget also includes a $10 million educational technology initiative to refurbish and upgrade used or donated computers. Governor Wilson's budget proposal for 1996-97 contains $100 million of additional current-year funding for educational technology for distribution on a per student basis. In 1994, Pacific Telesis was directed to distribute $35 million in rate overcharges. This $35 million may be made available to K-12 schools following a variety of hearings and court decisions.


Colorado

Planning:

Colorado's state plan, "A Vision for Technology in Colorado Education," was released in 1995 and focuses on increasing the use of state-of-the-art technologies and on staff development. Eight goals to achieve the vision for technology in Colorado education have been identified. Each goal has three or more objectives related to increasing integration of technology into instructional and administrative applications. Work has begun on priority tasks that will be achieved during the 1995-96 and 1996-97 school years.

Funding/Regulation:

Educational technology is getting a great deal of interest in both the legislative and executive branches of government with numerous bills being submitted to fund technology initiatives for pre/K-12 and higher education. In response to this, the pre/K-12 and higher education communities are working together to design a statewide telecommunications network and grant program for "classroom technologies." The Colorado Public Utilities Commission and US West reached an agreement in 1995 resulting in US West's allocation of over $5 million for community-based telecommunications projects for pre/K-12, higher education, health care, and libraries. Having cleared judicial tests, funds will be distributed shortly. Legislation was passed during the 1995 legislative sessions that allows local exchange carriers to provide discounted rates for interactive video applications for distance learning.


Connecticut

Planning:

Governor Rowland declared November 1995 "Technology Month," and set a goal of every school being connected by the year 2000. A private firm, the Center for Educational Leadership and Technology, has helped develop a statewide plan for technology that was approved by the State Board in December 1995. The Educational Telecommunications Services Task Force has been created to recommend funding sources and mechanisms and submit a plan to the legislature in 1996. The Joint Committee on Educational Technology was charged to make recommendations for the coordination of educational technology.

Funding:

In 1995, a $10.4 million competitive grant program was initiated from bond funds to assist local and regional school districts and regional educational service centers to support activities related to upgrading electrical systems, wiring buildings, and acquiring equipment.


Delaware

Planning:

The Delaware Educational Technology Plan is designed to link every classroom in the state with telecommunications access; set standards for school library, media, and technology centers; define physical plant requirements; develop long-range professional development strategies; and set goals for annual funding allocations for technology.

Services:

The Delaware Department of Public Instruction provides technical assistance in linking the state content standards in English/language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. The State Office of Telecommunications Management provides high-speed, direct-connection lines through the state telecommunications system to all secondary schools. Elementary schools will be connected by the end of the 1995-96 school year. The State Office of Telecommunications Management in cooperation with the Department of Public Instruction provides Internet connections to all educators free of charge.

Infrastructure:

The Delaware Center for Educational Technology is charged with creating a modern technology infrastructure in Delaware's public schools that will bring fiber optic, coaxial, and copper wire to every classroom in Delaware within the next three years.

Funding:

The state legislature has committed $30 million over three years to the Delaware Center for Educational Technology to fund the infrastructure initiative. Federal Goals 2000 funds have been used for technology planning and professional development, and to subsidize the cost of computers in poorer districts.


District of Columbia

Planning:

The District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Board of Education approved the Technology Plan 2000 for School Years 1991-1996 in 1991.

Services:

The Center for Innovative Technology and Training (CITT) was established for the purpose of providing state-of-the-art ongoing and recurrent technology-related training for hardware and software. The services provided by CITT will enable DCPS personnel the necessary support services to meet their technology related instructional and management needs.

Infrastructure:

A major thrust in the DCPS is to integrate the use of information technologies, telecommunications networks, and other learning technologies into curriculum and instruction. The Office of Management Information Services (MIS) plans to provide the necessary operating system hardware, software, and connectivity to give all elementary schools high-speed direct access to the DCPS wide area network (WAN) and to the Internet.

Funding:

The three units will pool funds from their budgets to make the above hardware and software purchases a reality. A proposed three-year budget totals nearly $9 million. Local schools will use their own budgets to acquire hardware through Title 1 funds and other sources.


Florida

Planning:

Florida developed its first technology plan, "Schoolyear 2000," in 1989. The Center for Educational Leadership and Technology, a private firm, has recently conducted a study of Florida's technology initiatives to guide development of a comprehensive instructional delivery system.

Infrastructure/Regulation:

The Educational Facilities Infrastructure Improvement Act was created to ensure access to advanced telecommunications services.

Funding:

The Florida legislature provided $117 million for technology in 1995.

Services:

The state uses a venture capital fund to support private sector development of software linked to the state's content standards. Florida schools receive a discount on the software, and the state receives royalty payments for sales outside the state.


Georgia

Planning:

Georgia's state plan for technology, "Instructional Technology Guidelines for the State of Georgia," is being updated by an Instructional Technology Task Force. The 1995 legislature enacted legislation to create a new Educators' Technology Training Commission to undertake a comprehensive study of the state's need for training educators in the use of technology. Its report is expected shortly.

Funding:

The budget to school systems for educational technology totals $50 million. It includes $3 million allocated to alternative schools, $500,000 for an Internet project for gifted students, and $1 million for educational technology at the Department of Children and Youth Services.


Hawaii

Planning:

"The Hawaii Technology Plan" has recently been completed. It includes strategies and benchmarks, and describes state activities to be undertaken in support of the plan.

Infrastructure/Regulation:

Hawaii NetDay was launched on January 11, 1996. The state has used its regulatory authority over cable television to ensure that every school has a cable link, and in 1994, the Hawaii Education and Research Network received $2 million from the National Science Foundation to provide training on the use of the Internet to every school through coaxial cable.


Idaho

Planning:

The state's education plan, "Schools for 2000 and Beyond," developed in 1992, includes a plan for "converting Idaho schools into high-tech institutions," focusing on equipment, infrastructure, and training for school staff. While never funded, the plan created momentum for technology use in schools. The legislature developed the "Idaho Education Technology Initiative" in 1994, creating a 15 member Council for Technology in Learning with membership spanning elementary and secondary education, higher education, the private sector, libraries, legislators, and broadcasting authorities.

Funding:

Schools received $10.4 million under the Idaho Educational Technology Initiative of 1994 for technology in the classroom. A competitive grant program for over $3 million provided other funds to schools.

Infrastructure:

All Idaho schools should be connected within five years.


Illinois

Planning:

The Illinois State Board of Education's Goal 5 reads, "All Illinois public school students will attend schools which effectively use technology as a resource to support student learning and improve operational efficiency." A number of activities have been initiated at the state level to support this goal, including the launching of the Educational Technology Hubs, the deployment of a statewide computer network, the establishment of Internet "points of presence," grants to 292 schools for on-line curriculum projects, grants to 98 schools and 4 museums for "Museums in the Classroom," strategic technology resources for 36 economically challenged schools, and the development of the Illinois K-12 Plan for Information and Technology.

Funding:

In FY96, lawmakers appropriated $15 million for projects that use technology and telecommunications to improve student learning.


Indiana

Planning:

The state requires that school districts submit five-year technology plans prior to spending capital projects funds and technology funds. The new Indiana Technology Fund provides $10,000 grants to be used for planning by those schools qualifying for major funding.

Funding:

Indiana allocates $4 million annually to the Educational Technology Fund to support three programs: the Buddy System Project, the 4Rs Program for early grades, and Access Indiana. The Indiana Technology fund is currently being supported by $20 million from gaming revenues. It funds Internet connections and the expansion of the Buddy System Project. The School Technology Advancement Account supports one percent interest loans of $5 million annually. The Computer Learning and Training Account, currently funded at $1.6 million annually, has supported a professional development program for teachers since 1983.

Infrastructure:

Intelenet Commission manages a fiber-optic network that connects 256 institutions of higher education, government agencies, and schools throughout the state. As a result of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission's approval of an Ameritech regulatory reform plan, Ameritech is investing $120 million over a six-year period to extend an advanced communications network to every interested school, hospital, and major government center in its Indiana service area. This network, which includes broadband voice, data, and interactive video applications, could link as many as 1,700 schools.

Services:

IDEAnet, a statewide telecommunications network, is available to all educators in the state through an 800 number.


Iowa

Planning:

"Education is Iowa's Future," a statewide plan for education, directs the state Department of Education to take "a leadership role by developing and communicating a compelling vision for using technology to transform the teaching and learning process, by facilitating the acquisition of technologies and providing appropriate staff development."

Infrastructure:

Iowa has developed the Iowa Communications Network, an interactive fiber-optic network designed to link all of Iowa's K-12 schools, education agencies, community colleges, colleges, and universities. Parts I and II of the network, creating a statewide backbone, are complete. Part III, connecting all school districts, area education agencies, and some public libraries, will be completed in the next four years.

Funding:

In 1995, the legislature appropriated $36 million for FY96 and FY97 for operating and completing Part III. They are also completing work on a bill that will appropriate $150 million over the next five years to develop and fund instructional technology in public schools.


Kansas

Planning:

The Kansas State Board of Education, using a team of 20 technology volunteers from school districts and higher education, created a technology planning guide for distribution to schools in Kansas. The planning guide contains a reference section for resources available by mail as well as electronically, an appendix identifying terms commonly used in technology discussions, and the three stages for developing and implementing a technology plan. The first stage identifies six steps that can provide a solid foundation for building a local plan.

Funding:

No state funding is available.


Kentucky

Planning:

The "Kentucky Master Plan for Educational Technology" specifies connections for all schools, classrooms, and school offices in the state, and recommends connections to the home for educational use. The plan calls for a telephone in each classroom, video in every classroom, a computer for every six students, and a computer for each teacher. The total cost is expected to be $560 million over six years.

Funding:

Kentucky provided $20 million from its educational technology trust fund for the 1994-95 school year. So far, a total of $195.4 million in state and local funds has been spent to implement the master plan.

Infrastructure:

All 176 districts are now online through an instructional and administrative network via T1 lines.

Services:

KETS, a statewide network of educational television, public libraries, and other organizations, provides technical assistance, professional development for teachers, statewide procurement contracts for hardware and software, and other services to school districts, as well as funding for instructional technology. The state provides recommended lists for software, and districts can use textbook dollars to buy recommended software products.


Louisiana

Planning:

The Louisiana Educational Technology Plan for Grades K-14 is being integrated into the state's Consolidated Plan to Improve Education in Louisiana. The Consolidated Plan will bring together planning efforts involving Louisiana Goals 2000, the Improving America's School Act, the School-to-Work Opportunities Act, Louisiana Systemic Initiatives Program (LaSIP), the Louisiana Networking Infrastructure for Education (LaNIE), and other technology initiatives.

Infrastructure/Regulation:

A multi-protocol, wide area network called LaNET is available within the state to educational institutions, political subdivisions of the state, and other qualifying organizations. LaNIE, the Louisiana Online University Information Systems (LOUIS), and the Louisiana Library Network (LLN) use LaNET to provide Internet access to schools and libraries at numerous sites throughout the state. Louisiana's Public Service Commission has established a special telecommunications tariff for education, which significantly reduces the rates charged to schools and libraries. Louisiana has a six-station public television network which reaches most of the state. Every school district in the state has at least one satellite dish. Several school districts also program their own cable access channel.



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Last Modified: 08/23/2003