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Toward A New Golden Age In American Education--How the Internet, the Law and Today's Students Are Revolutionizing Expectations
National Education Technology Plan 2004

Appendix B: How This Plan Was Developed

In developing this Plan, the U.S. Department of Education actively sought out the advice and insights of a broad range of stakeholders, including students, educators, researchers, parents, higher education and industry leaders. The Department organized meetings for input into the plan and participated in numerous conferences of stakeholder groups at venues around the country; convening meetings with stakeholder groups, other federal agencies, and individual experts to engage them in thinking about the plan; and, soliciting input through the www.nationaledtechplan.org web site.

Over the course of the development of the Plan, the Department received input from over 1,500 individuals and organizational representatives, including from dozens of leading education associations and industry representatives. Input provided by these groups took a variety of forms, including in some cases, summaries of surveys or other consensus activities these groups undertook of their own memberships and/or constituencies. Educators (including current and future teachers and teacher educators) most frequently responded to calls for input. In addition, through a partnership with NetDay, the Department received additional input from another 210,000 K-12 students who participated through their schools in NetDay's Speak Up Day 2003.

Invitational Meetings to Provide Input into the Plan

Numerous meetings of practitioners, experts, and organizational representatives were convened to publicize the development of the National Education Technology Plan and to seek input and advice. Participants in invitational meetings organized by the Department follow below.

Briefings on the Development of the National Education Technology Plan

  • Sterlin Adams, National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO), Silver Spring, MD
  • Donelle Blubaugh, National Coalition for Technology in Education and Training (NCTET), Alexandria, VA
  • Gene Broderson, Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Washington, DC
  • Majorie Bynum, Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), Arlington, VA
  • Tom Carroll, National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF), Washington, DC
  • Julie Copty, Association of American Publishers (AAP), Washington, DC
  • Nzigna Damal-Cathie, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE), Washington, DC
  • Buffy DeBreaux-Watts, American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence (ABCTE), Washington, DC
  • Norris Dickard, The Benton Foundation, Washington, DC
  • Paul Gardner, Association of Educational Publishers (AEP), Logan Township, NJ
  • Melinda George, State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA), Arlington, VA
  • Michael Hill, National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE), Alexandria, VA
  • Alisha Dixon Hyslop, Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE), Alexandria, VA
  • Allan Jordan, North American Council for Online Learning, (NACOL), Boulder, CO
  • Don Knezek, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), Washington, DC
  • Keith Krueger, Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), Washington, DC
  • Richard Mainzer, Professional Standards and Practice Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), Arlington, VA
  • Sally McConnell, National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP), Alexandria, VA
  • Sara McPhee, National Association of State Directors of Career Technical
  • Education Consortium (NASDCTEc), Washington, DC
  • Scott Montgomery, Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), Washington, DC
  • Nancy Reder, National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE), Alexandria, VA
  • Margaret Rivera, American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC
  • Mark Schneiderman, Software & Information Industry Association, Washington, DC
  • Pat Shea, Western Cooperative for Educational Telecommunications (WCET), Boulder, CO
  • Irene Spero, NetDay, Irvine, CA
  • Kendall Starkweather, International Technology Education Association (ITEA), Reston, VA
  • Barbara Stein, National Education Association, Washington, DC
  • Kimberly Tulp, Education Leaders Council (ELC), Washington, DC
  • Julie Walker, American Association of School Librarians (AASL), Chicago, IL
  • Robert Wickenden, Association of Educational Publishers (AEP), Logan Township, NJ

Exploring the Digital Generation

Research suggests that students today are coming to school with different expectations for their education due in large part to their use of technology in out-of-school settings. Today's generation of students represents an as of yet untapped impetus for school reform.

  • Stephanie Azzarone, Child's Play Communications, New York, NY
  • Robbie Blinkoff, Context-Based Research Group, Baltimore, MD
  • Kevin Bryne, Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, Alexandria, VA
  • Alice Cahn, Coliseum Live Entertainment, New York, NY
  • Sandra Calvert, Georgetown University, Washington, DC
  • David Dwyer, Apex Learning, Bellevue, WA
  • Julie Evans, NetDay, Irvine, CA
  • Peter Grunwald, Grunwald Associates, San Mateo, CA
  • Karen Jaffe, Child Trends, Washington, DC
  • Neil Howe, LifeCourse Associates, Great Falls, VA
  • Robert Kominski, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC
  • Greg Livingston, WonderGroup, Cincinnati, OH
  • Bruce Mehlman, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, DC
  • Diana Oblinger, Microsoft Corporation, Apex, NC
  • Michelle Poris, Yankelovich Partners, Inc., Norwalk, CT
  • Marc Prensky, games2train, New York, NY
  • Harrison "Lee" Rainie, Pew Internet & American Life Project, Washington, DC
  • Glenda Revelle, Sesame Workshop, New York, NY
  • Susan Royer, Sesame Workshop, New York, NY
  • Richard Russell, Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC
  • William Strauss, LifeCourse Associates, Great Falls, VA
  • Ellen Wartella, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX

Leadership for System-Wide Rethinking

Influencing and empowering school leaders to make sound decisions is critical to leveraging the opportunities offered by technology.

  • Susan Cates, ThinkEquity Partners, San Francisco, CA
  • Sue Collins, KCH Strategies & Apex Learning, Mercer Island, WA
  • Chris Dede, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
  • JoLynne DeMary, Virginia Department of Education, Richmond, VA
  • Sylvia Diaz, Miami-Dade Public County Schools, Miami, FL
  • Daniel Duke, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
  • David Dwyer, Apex Learning, Bellevue, WA
  • Mark Edwards, Henrico County Public Schools, Richmond, VA
  • Julie Evans, NetDay, Irvine, CA
  • Janice Fletcher, Georgia's Leadership Institute for School Improvement, Atlanta, GA
  • Gordon Freedman, Knowledge Base, Carmel, CA
  • Mike Hill, National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE), Alexandria, VA
  • Sally Johnstone, WCET, Boulder, CO
  • Marina Leight, Center for Digital Education, Folsom, CA
  • Christine Master, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL
  • Linda Roberts, Darnestown, MD
  • David Thornburg, Thornburg Center, Lake Barrington, IL
  • Norma Thornburg, Thornburg Center, Lake Barrington, IL
  • Kimberly Tulp, Education Leaders Council, Washington, DC
  • Carla Wade, Oregon Department of Education, Salem, OR
  • Chris Walsh, KIPP National, San Francisco, CA
  • Vicki Wilson, Henrico County Public Schools, Richmond, VA

Virtual School and E-Learning Opportunities

Online courses and supplemental services are proliferating and offer increased high-quality choices for students and parents. State and local policies may be inhibiting their growth and adoption.

  • Jim Benitez, Aventa Learning, Seattle, WA
  • Cliff Blackerby, Texas Region IV, Houston, TX
  • Linda Cavalluzzo, The CNA Corporation, Alexandria, VA
  • Tom Clark, TA Consulting, Springfield, IL
  • Sue Collins, KCH Strategies, Mercer Island, WA
  • Barbara Dreyer, Connections Academy, Baltimore, MD
  • Anita Givens, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX
  • Marina Leight, Center for Digital Government, Folsom, CA
  • Dane Linn, National Governors Association, Washington, DC
  • Keith Oelrich, KC Distance Learning, Portland, OR
  • Liz Pape, Virtual High School, Maynard, MA
  • Linda Pittenger, Kentucky Virtual High School, Frankfort, KY
  • Randy Rhine, Montana State University-Billings, Billings, MT
  • Ray Rose, The Concord Consortium, Concord, MA
  • Art Sheekey, CNA Corporation, Alexandria, VA
  • Burck Smith, Smarthinking, Washington, DC
  • Tim Stroud, North American Council for Online Learning, Washington, DC
  • Bill Thomas, Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA
  • Robert Tinker, Concord Consortium, Concord, MA
  • Gil Valdez, Learning Point Associates, Naperville, IL
  • Julie Young, Florida Virtual School, Orlando, FL
  • Charles Zogby, K12 Inc., McLean, VA

Technology's Role in Teacher Quality

The definition of a high-quality teaching force must shift with the times – and along with it, colleges of education and professional development providers need to seek out new, innovative ways to train and support educators.

  • Steven Bossert, Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC), Newark, DE
  • Edward Clifton, National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), Arlington, VA
  • Bobb Darnell, Forest View Educational Center, Arlington Heights, IL
  • Kathleen Fulton, National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF), Washington, DC
  • Ronald Gallimore, UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • Cathy Gunn, North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL), Naperville, IL
  • Marianne Handler, National-Louis University, Wheeling, IL
  • Sharnell Jackson, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL
  • Cheryl Lani Juárez, Miami Museum of Science and Planetarium, Miami, FL
  • Jim Konantz, California Virtual Academies, Oakland, CA
  • Melinda Maddox, Alabama Department of Education, Montgomery, AL
  • Kathleen Madigan, American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence (ABCTE), Washington, DC
  • Joyce Pittman, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • June Rivers, SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC
  • Linda Rosen, Education and Management Innovations Inc., Bethesda, MD
  • William L. Sanders, SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC
  • Rossella Santagata, LessonLab Inc., Santa Monica, CA
  • Mark Schlager, Tapped In, Menlo Park, CA
  • Lajeane Thomas, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA
  • Bonnie Thurber, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Drivers of Broadband Deployment

Education may serve as the greatest demand for the expansion of broadband connectivity to schools and homes. In this regard, school leaders have an opportunity and an obligation to shape telecommunications policy as it has the potential to affect schools.

  • Trent Anderson, Cablevision Systems, Corp., Bethpage, NY
  • Deb Bonanno, Pearson Digital Learning, Scottsdale, AZ
  • Holly Davis, Altair Learning Management, Inc., Columbus, OH
  • Kevin Dellicker, Affinity Group of Harrisburg, LLC, Harrisburg, PA
  • Richard Edwards, Edwards Training & Consulting, Pearland, TX
  • John Flores, United States Distance Learning Association (USDLA), Boston, MA
  • Hudnall Croasdale, Internet 2 Studio, Richmond, VA
  • Michael Golden, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA
  • Jon Haber, SkillCheck, Inc., Burlington, MA
  • Chris Israel, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, DC
  • Mark Kelly, Sprint, Overland Park, KS
  • David Lois, WiscNet, Madison, WI
  • Helen Morris, Texas Instruments, Alexandria, VA
  • Greg Nadeau, U.S. Open e-Learning Consortium, Somerville, MA
  • Stagg Newman, McKinsey and Company, Candler, NC
  • Peggy O'Brien, Cable in the Classroom, Washington, DC
  • Ron Reed, United Learning, Prospect Heights, IL
  • Michelle M. Roper, Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC
  • Terrance Rogers, Advanced Network & Services, Armonk, NY
  • Garret Sern, EDUCAUSE, Washington, DC
  • Jim Stewart, Utah Education Network
  • Tim Stroud, North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL), Washington, DC
  • Ken Thompson, Mississippi Department of Education, Jackson, MS
  • John Vaille, Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC), Los Alamitos, CA
  • Charles L. Wallace, BellSouth, Atlanta, GA

Anytime, Anywhere Technology Access

Increasing numbers of states and districts are seeing value in providing a computing device to each student. Valuable lessons can be learned and shared from these early adopters.

  • Karen Bruett, Dell, Inc., Round Rock, TX
  • Jay Bryant, Educational Testing Service (ETS), Princeton, NJ
  • David Byer, Apple Computer, Inc., Washington, DC
  • Barbara Catenaci, Beaufort County School District, Hilton Head Island, SC
  • David Cavallo, MIT Media Laboratory, Cambridge, MA
  • Mary Cullinane, Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA
  • Rob Darrow, Clovis Unified School District, Clovis, CA
  • Mark Edwards, Henrico County Public Schools, Richmond, VA
  • Tom Greaves, The Greaves Group, Palo Alto, CA
  • Bill Hamilton, Walled Lake Consolidated Schools, Walled Lake, MI
  • Margaret Honey, EDC Center for Children and Technology, New York, NY
  • Bob Lally, LeapFrog SchoolHouse, Emeryville, CA
  • Cheryl Lemke, Metiri Group, Culver City, CA
  • Mike Lorion, palmOne, Inc., Milpitas, CA
  • Bette Manchester, Maine Department of Education, Augusta, ME
  • Raymond McGhee, SRI International, Arlington, VA
  • Helen Morris, Texas Instruments, Alexandria, VA
  • Cathie Norris, University of North Texas, Denton, TX
  • Josh Reibel, Wireless Generation, New York, NY
  • Phil Richardson, ETG Technologies, Inc., The Woodlands, TX
  • Saul Rockman, Rockman Et Al, San Francisco, CA
  • Michael Russell, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA
  • Bill Rust, Gartner, Inc., Catonsville, MD
  • Mark Schneiderman, Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), Washington, DC
  • Jim Schnitz, IBM, Holladay, UT
  • Dan Schultz, Michigan Virtual University, Lansing, MI
  • Linda Sharp, AlphaSmart, Inc, Greenwood Village, CO
  • Elliot Soloway, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Ron Thorpe, Thirteen/WNET, New York, NY
  • Bruce Wilcox, Harcourt Incorporated, Orlando, FL
  • Denaya Wininger, Frontier Public School, Red Rock, OK
  • Andy Zucker, Education Development Center (EDC), Newton, MA

Data-Driven Decision-Making, Accountability, and School Transformation

Having good data to guide decisions in schools and for instruction is critical to ensuring that all the nation's children achieve. New technological solutions have the potential to generate actionable data about school performance—in many cases for the first time.

  • Fred Balfour, Align to Achieve, Inc., Watertown, MA
  • Dean Bergman, Nebraska Department of Education, Lincoln, NE
  • John Boling, SAS Institute, Cary, NC
  • David Coleman, The Grow Network, New York, NY
  • Alvin Crawford, SchoolNet, Inc., New York, NY
  • David DeSchryver, SchoolNet, Inc., Washington, DC
  • Charlie Garten, Poway Unified School District, Poway, CA
  • Joe Kitchens, Western Heights Public Schools, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Keith Krueger, Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), Washington, DC
  • Jacqueline Lain, Standard & Poor's, New York, NY
  • Eliot Levinson, BLE Group, Washington, DC
  • Elaine Liftin, Council for Education Change, Davie, FL
  • Jane Lockett, IBM Business Consulting Services, Orlando, FL
  • Bob Longo, PowerSchool, Folsom, CA
  • Maribeth Luftglass, Fairfax County Public Schools, Annandale, VA
  • Dale Mann, Interactive, Inc., New York, NY
  • Dean Millot, National Charter School Alliance, St. Paul, MN
  • Cathy Mincberg, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX
  • Allan Olson, Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA), Portland, OR
  • Mike Patterson, Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA), Portland, OR
  • Mark Schneiderman, Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA), Washington, DC
  • Peter Sibley, Edmin.com, San Diego, CA
  • Joe Simpson, Council of Chief State Schools Officers (CCSSO), Washington, DC
  • Irene Spero, Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), Washington, DC
  • Matt Stein, Eduventures, Inc., Boston, MA
  • Samuel Stringfield, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Bill Tudor, Scantron Corporation, Irvine, CA
  • Hugh Walkup, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC
  • Jeff Wayman, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Budgeting and Funding Models for 21st Century Education Systems

Federal funds have disproportionately supported the purchasing of technology in schools, but innovative states and districts have rebuilt their budgets from the ground up to reflect the new opportunities afforded by technology. These sites are well-positioned for the future and are much better insulated from short-term funding fluctuations.

  • Kathleen Brantley, Market Data Retrieval, Shelton, CT
  • David Byer, Apple Computer, Inc., Washington, DC
  • John Clement, American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC
  • Sara Fitzgerald, Funds For Learning, LLC, Arlington, VA
  • Anne Flynn, National School Boards Association, Alexandria, VA
  • Jeanne Hayes, Quality Education Data, Inc., Denver, CO
  • Steve Honegger, American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC
  • Keith Krueger, Consortium for School Networking (CoSN), Washington, DC
  • Mark Maine, Pomona Unified School District, Pomona, CA
  • John Musso, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC
  • Bill Rust, Gartner, Inc., Catonsville, Maryland
  • Mark Schneiderman, Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA), Washington, DC
  • William R. Thomas, Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA
  • Brenda Williams, West Virginia Department of Education, Charleston, WV

Commissioned Papers

The Department commissioned several papers from experts to help inform the development of the Plan. These include:

AuthorPaper
Katie McMillan Culp
Margaret Honey
Ellen Mandinach
Education Development Center
New York, NY
A Retrospective on Twenty Years of Education Technology Policy
Chrys Dougherty
National Center for Educational Accountability
Austin, TX
How States Can Use Information Technology to Support School Improvement Under NCLB
Glynn D. Ligon
ESP Solutions Group
Austin, TX
A Technology Framework to Support Accountability and Assessment: How States Can Evaluate Their Status for No Child Left Behind
Steve Fleischman
American Institutes for Research
Washington, DC
The Role of Educational Technology in Meeting the Promise of Supplemental Educational Services
Bryan C. Hassel
Michelle Godard Terrell
Public Impact
Chapel Hill, NC
How Can Virtual Schools Be a Vibrant Part of Meeting the Choice Provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act?
Glenn M. Kleiman
Education Development Center
Newton, MA
Meeting the Need for High Quality Teachers: e-Learning Solutions
Susan R. Collins
KCH Strategies
Seattle, WA
e-Learning Frameworks for NCLB

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Last Modified: 07/23/2012