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OPE: Office of Postsecondary Education
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Frequently Asked Questions: Talent Search and EOC Programs Annual Performance Report for Budget Period 2010-11

TRIO provides answers below to questions about the 2010-11 annual performance report format that came to our attention after the Office of Management and Budget approved the APR.

  1. More and more regions are starting school before Labor Day. If a senior is served by a Talent Search project beginning the day school starts (e.g., August 15, 2011), he or she will not graduate or enroll until 2012 (in the subsequent budget period); thus for the 2010–11 budget period the student cannot be counted in the graduation and postsecondary enrollment objectives. This decreases a project's success rate for these objectives. How can a project avoid this?

  2. In EOC, may a project count a postsecondary student in the objectives for postsecondary admission and financial aid?

  3. If a student completes all requirements for registration at an institution of postsecondary education but never attends class, may a project count him or her as enrolled?

  4. If a participant enters military service after high school graduation, how should a project count him or her?

  5. Under what circumstances should EOC projects list target schools in Section II?

Objectives

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1. More and more regions are starting school before Labor Day. If a senior is served by a Talent Search project beginning the day school starts (e.g., August 15, 2011), he or she will not graduate or enroll until 2012 (in the subsequent budget period); thus for the 2010–11 budget period the student cannot be counted in the graduation and postsecondary enrollment objectives. This decreases a project's success rate for these objectives. How can a project avoid this?

Response: Talent Search projects are encouraged to follow the academic year, not the budget year, in determining when and how to count participants. Thus, ED recommends that a student first served in August 2011 as part of the 2011–12 academic year be reported as a new participant in 2011–12.

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2. In EOC, may a project count a postsecondary student in the objectives for postsecondary admission and financial aid?

Response: No. This would be inconsistent with the wording of the objectives, and accordingly in the APR postsecondary students (III.A5) are not included in the denominator for objectives for postsecondary admission and financial aid.

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Enrollment

3. If a student completes all requirements for registration at an institution of postsecondary education but never attends class, may a project count him or her as enrolled?

Response: According to the wording of the objectives, yes, such a participant would count as an enrolled student in the APR.

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4. If a participant enters military service after high school graduation, how should a project count him or her?

Response: While joining the military is a service to the country, it does not constitute postsecondary education (unless, of course, a participant enrolls in a postsecondary military school, e.g., the U.S. Coast Guard Academy).

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Target Schools

5. Under what circumstances should EOC projects list target schools in Section II?

Response: Target schools are defined in the Talent Search program regulations as schools designated as foci of project services. The program regulations allow EOC projects to serve participants under the age of 19 under certain circumstances. If an EOC project is serving participants 18 or younger in target schools included in the approved application or approved separately by the program specialist, then the project should list those schools in Section II. Target schools do not include postsecondary institutions.

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Last Modified: 11/03/2011